Currently viewing the tag: "Wim Rampen"

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Networking for Survival by  Deborah Mills-Scofield

We think about networking as a very modern notion, with our accumulation of virtual “friends,” “followers,” and people-who-might-be-useful-to-us-someday. To me, it is just an extension of what my people, my family have been doing since 70 AD — making critical connections that enable both our survival. The tools may have changed, but our reliance on the network has not. In fact, without the network, I literally wouldn’t be alive.

 

Innovation is Impossible by Tim Kastelle

James Altucher recently suggested that “Eat All You Want of the Foods You Love and Still Lose Weight” would be a great book title – that no matter what was inside, it would sell. It’s easy to see why. Many of us like to eat all we want of the foods we love, and we also want to lose weight, so if we could do both at the same time, wouldn’t that be great?

                                                                                                                                                      To Know, but Not Understand: David Weinberger on Science and Big Data by  David Weinberger via Ralph Ohr

In an edited excerpt from his new book, Too Big to Know, David Weinberger explains how the massive amounts of data necessary to deal with complex phenomena exceed any single brain’s ability to grasp, yet networked science rolls on.

                                                                                                                                                         The Philosophy of Motivation by Greg Satell

Peter Drucker, the legendary management theorist, told us that we have to “accept the fact that we have to treat almost anybody as a volunteer.”

                                                                                                                                                        Why Organizational Innovation Is So Difficult by Joe Evans

In all ecosystems, organisms that evolve to survive the elements of their environments will likely continue their existence. Those that do not continue to evolve will most likely perish. Likewise, for business organizations to evolve, they must innovate their products, services, technologies, policies, processes and structures to capitalize on social, economic and industry trends within their environment. This is easier said than done.

                                                                                                                                                      How To (Not) Get Smart About Big Data by Wim Rampen

If you are to believe the talk of twitter-town and its suburbs, due to the connectivity of numerous devices worldwide, we (will) also have available so much data, it is just waiting to be mined and will change how we do, well..,  just about everything. All this is being referred to as Big Data. The problem with all this data of course is the filtering.

                                                                                                                                                    How Design Thinking Can Enrich Business and Marketing Innovation by  BEN WOOD, MARK WHITING & DAVID STOCKS

Design empowered innovation combines the best of right and left brain thinking. It has the capacity to deliver better ideas, with more relevance, realized earlier.

Have a nice week!

 

 

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Customer Service in 2012 and Beyond Technology.. by Wim Rampen

Today’s post is triggered by Esteban Kolsky’s 2012 prediction for Customer Service markets. His predictions make sense, because Esteban is a good analyst that understands his job and takes it seriously. And since I do not understand a lot about the IT market, and frankly don’t want to, I advice you to trust Esteban’s views on that.

IDEO’s Steve Bishop on the Future of Sustainable Design Thinking by Rachel Signer

Steve Bishop is global lead of environmental impact at the design and business innovation firm IDEO. At IDEO, Bishop helps companies build brands, develop new products, and design new innovation processes inspired by principles of sustainability.

Ten Tensions in Innovation – Revised by Tim Kastelle

The single most important management skill to develop is a tolerance for ambiguity. Why? Because we often must manage objectives that are contradictory. For example, Firms that are successful at innovation are able to simultaneously come up with ideas that allow them to take advantage of what they’re really good at (exploitation) while also being able to search for novel new ideas (exploration).

Do Experts Slow Innovation? By Joseph F Coughlin via Ralph-Ohr

Innovation – everyone says they want it, but when it’s time to personally embrace it and change what they do everyday there is often reluctance, if not outright resistance.

 

Innovation in Psychology by Moses Ma

This blog is about innovation and invention of things, and I was recently provided an opportunity to glimpse into the creation of one of humanity’s greatest inventions – psychotherapy. A new film.

The New Psychology of Marketing by Greg Satell

Clearly, psychology and marketing are deeply related. What we buy is a function of how we think and what we think is a product of the way our minds work.

Are We Happy Yet? The Unexpected Links Between Happiness and Choice by Alice LaPlante via Riitta Raesmaa

The key to happiness lies in the choices you make, or so they say.

Yet, new research by long-time collaborators Jennifer Aaker, Cassie Mogilner, and Sep Kamvar suggests that people don’t make choices based on a single or shared notion of happiness.

What If You Changed and No One Noticed? By Jesse Lyn Stoner

Have you ever tried changing a behavior and no one noticed you were different? It’s not uncommon.

Jim was a “hands-on boss.” He had high standards and his team performed well. However, they depended on him for almost all decisions, and as a result he worked long hours and on weekends.

Have a nice week!

 

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Sorry, Marketing’s 4P framework is not dead.. by Wim Rampen

Why Do B-Schools Still Teach The Famed 4P’s Of Marketing, When Three Are Dead?That was the question raised by Jens Martin Skibsted and Rasmus Bech Hansen and it received some good traction. Skibsted and Hansen argue that the only P of the four alive is Product.

4 Roles for Your Innovation Team by Tim Kastelle

Here’s a persistent innovation management question: is it better to have a dedicated team responsible for innovation, or should this responsibility be distributed throughout your entire organisation? The best answer depends on your circumstances. But if you set up a dedicated team, it’s important to consider what role you want them to play. There are four different roles that a dedicated innovation team can fill.

Reward insight or reward ideas? Both and… by Jorge Barba

This is a tricky question.

First of all, insights are different from ideas. Insights are more important than ideas. Breakthrough businesses are build on insights, not ideas. Ideas come after the insight. Yet in innovation circles we constantly hear that we should reward people for coming up with ideas. What about rewarding people for insights?

The Ultimate Code by Greg Satell

Digeratti are an unusual bunch.  Branded with distinctive facial hair configurations and fueled by caffeine, they run around coding, pitching, inventing and envisioning a bold new future.

GEN Z IN THE WORKPLACE – THOUGHTS AFTER #TCHAT by Pam Ross

There was a great discussion, and at times, debate, on #TChat last week, all about Generation Z and the workplace.  It feels like we just learned about Gen Y and how to engage them in the workplace, and it’s already time to prepare for Gen Z!

What Do Workplace Pit Bulls Do to Accountability? By Kate Nasser

Leaders, do you appoint someone the workplace pit bull believing it will make everyone more responsible and accountable? Let’s considerwhat workplace pit bulls do to accountability.

Two Collaborative Care Case Studies by Arie Goldshlager

The Collaborative Chronic Care Network (C3N) is certainly a very inspiring case of Collaborative Care Networks:

“Americans receive only 50% of recommended care and typically perform only about half of the “self-management” procedures and behaviors necessary to keep them healthy.

Explained: Why We Don’t Like Change by Heidi Grant Halvorson via Ralp-Ohr

Thinking about trying to shake things up at work? Brimming with new ideas and strategies? Hoping to get your organization to try a new way of doing things, or maybe just get your family to alter their holiday traditions a bit? Good for you.

Have a nice week!

 

 

 

 

 

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The Crisis of Meaning in the Millennial Workforce by Megan Erickson

What’s the Big Idea?

For all the talk of trailblazing, the most successful businesses of the 20th century made it to the top by maintaining an edge in the same singular pursuit: maximizing shareholder value.

The Marvels and the Flaws of Intuitive Thinking by Daniel Kahneman via Ralph Ohr

“The power of settings, the power of priming, and the power of unconscious thinking, all of those are a major change in psychology. I can’t think of a bigger change in my lifetime. You were asking what’s exciting? That’s exciting, to me.”

Can mastery and innovation coexist? By Jorge Barba

Jonathan Fields posted this question in a Psychology Today article last week. Here is my answer and would love to hear yours.

It’s a great question and not at all difficult to answer, though it’s better said than done. First of all, mastery is never achieved. It’s a goal, but a goal we’ll never reach.

The Finnish Awesomeness and Entrepreneurship by Riitta Raesmaa

Something exceptional is happening here in Finland. However I think that the foundation for that has existed a long time, only to wait its time to come. And it seems that the time is here and now. Let me explain.

 

IDEO: Big Innovation Lives Right on the Edge of Ridiculous Ideas by Jake Cook

Imagine for a second if you could somehow wrap up the creative chaos of a kindergartner’s life and apply it at work. You’d go on field trips, make stuff, hatch crazy ideas, and be awed by the world on a daily basis. Sound ridiculous? At the renowned international design consultancy IDEO, it’s how work gets done every day.

 

Co-Creating Business Models by Deborah Mills-Scofield

In 2009,  I was privileged to co-create an awesome book, Business Model Generation, with Alex Osterwalder and Yves Pigneur.     Co-creating the book with Alex was an amazing experience, created some lasting friendships with other co-creators, and of course Alex.  After Angela Dunn‘s monthly twitter-chat, #ideachat, I decided to ask Alex what made him decide to do co-create this book:

The 10 Most Important Trends in Business by Haydn Shaughnessy

What is the single most important trend in business today? If there was a beauty contest or an arm wrestle to decide, then the big surprise would be the sheer number of contestants.

5 Things You Need To Know About (Social) CRM (Definitions) by Wim Rampen

I think trying to define something is a very good exercise to understand what you are dealing with or what you are trying to do it for. It also helps to communicate internally. And regardless of what many say, I don’t think there are enough definitions of (Social) CRM, at least not good ones.. But that is a personal opinion, not relevant to today’s post.

Building a Better Business by Design by RAYLENE KNUTSON

Are you a business that wants to innovate? Think like a designer. That’s the message from a growing number of consultants, business leaders, policy makers and educators who think companies need to swap obsessive analytics for more right-brain experimentation.

When Working Memory Kicks In by Ellen Weber

Unless looking for lost golf balls, that hold up games –  stay with a thing until you find it. The brain’s working memory kicks in to land life-changing dreams, when you GO FOR IT. On the flip side of waiting for windfalls – winners run with What if … possibilities – and working memory lands new deals.

Have a nice week!

 

Enjoy it

 

The Finnish Awesomeness and Entrepreneurship by Riitta Raesmaa

Something exceptional is happening here in Finland. However I think that the foundation for that has existed a long time, only to wait its time to come. And it seems that the time is here and now. Let me explain.

Who’s Next – A spotlight on innovative thinkers who are changing the future of business. FastCompany via Ralph-Ohr

We’re helping people make decisions faster and in a better way,” says Christy Liu, cofounder and director of marketing at Wanderfly. “We’re also getting people to travel more. The whole idea of the site is about inspriation, so what we hope to do and what we are already doing is is getting people sort of off their bums and traveling the world.

The Customer Is Always Wrong by Wim Rampen

I think the Customer is wrong many more times than she’s right..

Customers don’t fill out (online) forms like they should, they don’t read the terms and conditions when they buy, they are wrong about what they thought they read (somewhere), about how to use your product and how to maintain it..

 

Co-Creating Business Models by Deborah Mills-Scofield

In 2009,  I was privileged to co-create an awesome book, Business Model Generation, with Alex Osterwalder and Yves Pigneur.     Co-creating the book with Alex was an amazing experience, created some lasting friendships with other co-creators, and of course Alex.  After Angela Dunn‘s monthly twitter-chat, #ideachat, I decided to ask Alex what made him decide to do co-create this book:

Your Customers’ Big Irritation is a Big Opportunity by Arie Goldshlager

I found this Don Sull  “top 10” field guide to clues for hidden breakthrough opportunities article packed full of instructive observations. Please note particularly:

 

Let’s Be A Little More Creative About Creativity. And What Does Collective Creativiry Means? By Idris Mootee

Scholarly interest in creativity ranges widely: Topics to which it is relevant include the relationship between creativity and general intelligence; the mental and neurological processes associated with creative activity; the relationship between personality type and creative ability; the relationship between creativity and mental health;

The Fat File by Patti Blackstaffe

Do you keep a file that holds all of the awards, recognition and comments made to you about your performance?  I do.  I keep everything written about my performance by the companies for whom I have worked in addition to the customers and clients I have served and I call it my Fat File.

How to Perform Under Pressure by Greg Satell

Okay, it’s your big day.  Everything is on the line.  All of your blood and sweat has led up to this point and now it really matters.  What happens next is up to you.

Have a nice week! 

 

Enjoy it!

 

Renaissance.. by Wim  Rampen

This morning I was listening to news coverage on the Oslo attack.. I don’t have this often, nor soon, but shivers continue to go down my spine listening to survivor stories and even when thinking about them..

 

Systems Intelligence, Serendipity and Listening for the Better Decisions by Riitta Raesmaa

I’ve earlier blogged about how I find intuition and seeing the value of the tacit knowledge as very interesting perspectives for the decision-making.

 

How Social Network Analysis Solves Real World Problems by Greg Satell

I’m LinkedIn.  I’ve got friends on Facebook.  I tweet.  Yo, I got stooopid Klout!  Look at me!  I’m connected!

And so are you and lots of other things, like ecosystems, molecules, our bodies’ metabolisms, the list goes on.

 

Innovation as a Means for Economic Evolution by Paul Hobcraft

Economic growth is an outcome of the innovation trajectory we set. Today managing innovation is complex; often success is measured and valued by the creative destruction of others.

 

Paradox of Innovation & Status Quo by Deborah Mills Scofield

As much as I love change, innovation, #RCUS (Random Collisions of Unusual Suspects per Saul Kaplan) and challenging the Status Quo, I realized how much the comfort and haven of some Status Quo means to me as we got settled at our place in Maine. 

 

In the Eye of the Beholder by Jason Plaks via Ralp Ohr

Imagine two people, Jim and John. Jim planned to succeed in business and accomplished his goal through a series of deliberate steps. John fell into the exact same business success through serendipity and coincidence.

 

A Trick of the Mind by Ronald Bailey

Superstitions arise as the result of the spurious identification of patterns. Even pigeons are superstitious. In an experiment where food is delivered randomly, pigeons will note what they were doing when the pellet arrived, such as twirling to the left and then pecking a button, and perform the maneuver over and over until the next pellet arrives

 

Bust Your Innovation Myths by Art Markman

It is common to tell stories of great discoveries. Hundreds of years later, we still talk about Galileo Galilei dropping balls of different weights off the Leaning Tower of Pisa to shatter existing beliefs about the way objects fall

 

Nothing kills an idea faster than common sense by Luke Williams

In his book This Means This, This Means That, Sean Hall asks readers to vote on which of two sentences is the best. “The cat sat on the mat.,” or “The cat sat on the dog’s mat?”

I know that may sound painfully simple, but it illustrates the point beautifully.

 

Have a nice week!

 

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Why Diversity is Good for Business by Jeanette Mulvey via Ralph-Ohr

There’s lots of talk about innovation being the key to growing American businesses, but exactly how companies get innovative remains less clearly defined. One way to drive innovation, according to a new Forbes study, is to hire a more diverse work force.

 

Getting Open Innovation Participation by Andrea Meyer

Point: Crowdsourcing and open innovation efforts rely on participation.  Attracting participants and encouraging activity is a key success factor in obtaining and vetting new product, service and process innovation ideas.

 
‘Better’ is the more practical approach to innovation in general by Jorge Barba

It all starts with the question: How can I make this better?

Framing is important and when talking about innovation that usually means deciding between incremental and radical change. Yet for most businesses, they don’t want to hear about change. They want the world they exist in just the way it is, especially if they’ve had some level of success.

 

Set Up Your Team for Success by Jesse Lyn Stoner 

Do you have a new team or are you starting a new project? Most teams rush into the work of the team without getting clear agreements in the beginning about where they are going or how they want to get there.

 

And the All Time Winner is… by Wim Rampen

We’ve already past the first 6 months of this year. A good time to take a look at what you have been reading around here. I’ve put together two lists: one Top 5 of all time best viewed posts and one Top 5 of the best viewed posts over the first six months of this year.

 

Incumbentitis – The Anti-Innovation Disease by Deb Mills-Scofield

Well, will congress put the country or their own political careers first?  You’d think they should be one and the same but we know they aren’t. With the upcoming elections, getting re-elected will matter more.  In 2010, it was out with the ‘old’, in with the new, mostly.  Washington DCers (and Wall Street) want desperately to maintain the status quo, yet America is asking for government by the people, of the people and for the people (sound familiar?). Can the US Government re-invent itself? Well, can big established companies even do it?

 

Transformation further Distilled by Sinan Si Alhir

Thriving and high performing organizations are founded on strong cultures, which involve shared values, strategy alignment, and interconnection. Such organizations achieve 4 times higher revenue, 7 times more expanded work force, 12 times higher stock prices, and 756% higher net income. However, approximately 70% of all change initiatives focused on improving performance fail!

 

The Mona Lisa Code by Greg Satell

Everybody knows the Mona Lisa.  She’s iconic; as much of a symbol of art as art itself. Housed in Paris but reproduced everywhere, there is probably nothing else on earth that so thoroughly fuses the ridiculous and the sublime as the Mona Lisa.

 

The New Game Of Strategy: Applied Design Thinking In Business Innovation And Transformation by Idris Mootee

Just when I thought I can have 2 days in an office then I realized I have to be In NYC tomorrow for a few days. I am writing this post on a flight after missing my connection in Houston, and just finished teaching a three days Strategy graduate course with a focus on strategic innovation and design thinking.

Have a nice week 

 

 

Enjoy it

 

Diversity, complexity, chaos and working smarter by Harold Jarche via Ralp-Ohr

Here are some of the things I learned via Twitter this past week.

What Diversity Really Means by Alicia Arenas

There was a pretty fantastic Twitter conversation happening last week on #TChat; it was about diversity. Be sure to check out the preview on MonsterThinking and the #TChat recap.

 

SOMETHING NEW: MEASURING TEAM IQ by Karsten Jonsen via Arie Goldshlager

Teams have intelligence just like individual people do. But the intelligence factor of human groups is not simply the average of its members, in fact that has only little to do with it.

This Space Intentionally Left White by Sabina Nawaz

Looking for an edge over your competition? Searching for an untapped market? Try slowing down to see more, two hours at a time.

 

 

Value Co-Creation Canvas by Wim Rampen

Presentation

6 Ways to Spot Liars and Fools by Greg Sattel

Some people are dishonest, some are just plain stupid and lots write articles and provide commentary.  Inevitably there’s going to be some intersection between the three sets.

Random Thoughts On Muggles, Magic And Design Thinking by Idris Mootee

For those of you who are not familiar with Muggles, they are people who are incapable of magic, and who are usually unaware of the wizarding world. Design Thinking is sort of like wizardries, it takes certain type of people with the certain type of training, Hogwarts or Harvard.

Laughter sets your mind free by Jorge Barba

A few days ago I was part of a brainstorming session for a client who recently opened a new restaurant in Mexico. The goal of the brainstorming session was to come up with ideas on how to create an experience that would make customers talk about it to their friends.

Picking the Big Idea by Nilofer Merchant

Most of us make things happen, get results, and deliver. But ask us if we’re focused on building our vision, on our big goals or if we even know what our big goal is, and what will likely follow is some combination of this: a big pause, or a look down at the carpeted floor, or talk of corporate handcuffs, or a nervous laugh, or a sudden change of subject.

Have a nice week

Equipas interdisciplinares e co-criação

 

Pense nisto:

Fazer uma chamada de telefone requer um telefone, a pessoa que faz a chamada e a interacção processo (pegar o telefone, marcar número) e se alguém ou alguma coisa atender, requer mais uma pessoa ou mais uma máquina. Só o telefone ou a pessoa e muito menos a o acto de marcar como o processo, quase não fazem sentido.

O importante no cenário apresentado não é a enumeração de passos para fazer uma chamada mas sim perceber que muitas vezes esquecemos que existem interacções entre pessoas e entre pessoas e objectos e que estas podem representar um serviço.

E o que é um serviço?

“O serviço é a soma pessoal das experiências de um cliente em todas as suas interacções, por meio de pontos de contacto, com os produtos e / ou serviços da empresa e em todas as suas interacções com as experiências relevantes de outras pessoas, através ou nas redes sociais (on-line)  do cliente perfazendo a percepção do cliente sobre o valor recebido e / ou a receber da empresa em qualquer momento.” – Wim Rampen

E o que pode ser design de serviços?

Quando pensarmos em serviços não foquemos os produtos, procuremos focar os consumidores e pensar em processos de criação de valor, onde o valor emergente para os consumidores é percebido por eles.

O que se procura é desenhar e organizar as interacções entre quem providencia os serviço e o utilizador final de forma criativa (processos e métodos)

Um dos elementos básicos de uma lógica de serviços é o entendimento de que ambos os bens (tangíveis) e serviços (intangíveis) prestam um serviço ao cliente.

Pensemos em bens intangíveis que sejam, a partir do ponto de vista do cliente, úteis, rentáveis e desejáveis, mas também sejam eficazes, eficientes e diferenciadores para o provedor.

O princípio fundamental da lógica dominante de serviço é o serviço recíproco, definido como a aplicação de competências de uma organização em benefício de outra parte, que é a base fundamental da economia de troca.

E como é que se pode chegar lá?

Pesquisando, conceptualizando, projectando, construindo e implementando.

As equipas em design de serviço visualizam, formulam soluções e coreografam as novas possibilidades. Ao interpretar as necessidades e os comportamentos dos potenciais utilizadores elas transformam-nas em potenciais futuros serviços.

Por exemplo, para criar experiências de serviço atraente,”IDEO utiliza ferramentas como a construção de cenários, “bodystorming”, mapeamento de viagem do cliente, prototipagem e vídeo para criar uma visão tangível e accionável do resultado desejado”.

Esta abordagem para concepção de serviços envolve especialistas de diversas áreas constituindo equipas interdisciplinares ou em alguns pontos generalistas como refere Tamsin Smith :

“Como o Design de serviço se destina a criar uma relação simbiótica entre provedor e usuário, a investigação é projectada para activamente envolver e investigar todas as pessoas significativas no ecossistema de serviço. A fim de compreender as pessoas, sistemas, estratégia e modelos de negócio, o design serviço apoia-se em, e é, um mistura de disciplinas. A realização da investigação em design é a base para a construção e o desenvolvimento de qualquer projecto.”

As competências básicas de uma pesquisa tradicional não são suficientes para um design de serviços eficaz. Não basta conversar, ouvir, observar e investigar. È necessário planear, projectar actividades de pesquisa e sintetizar “leituras” de forma sistemática e com significado sempre num clima de abertura e partilha de forma a co-criar valor.

A clarificação do contexto é extremamente importante e isso inclui a própria organização provedora de um serviço.

Conhecendo bem o contexto onde estamos inseridos fica mais fácil estabelecer conexões e de uma forma colaborativa podemos co-criar.

Numa organização, os bens, as ideias e a informação, o conhecimento e as competências de um empregado, são também um mecanismo de distribuição para providenciar serviços, onde o cliente é sempre um co-criador de valor.

Design de serviços é o processo colaborativo de melhoria do valor económico, social e ambiental que os produtos e serviços podem oferecer aos seus clientes. Ao contrário de disciplinas tradicionais do design, design de serviços emprega uma abordagem holística para avaliar a demanda, ofertas e estratégias para oferecer serviços através de múltiplos pontos de contacto e canais ao longo do tempo. Ela olha para agregar valor tanto para usuários e provedores, melhorando não apenas factores como facilidade, satisfação e aparência dos serviços, mas também os sistemas operacionais e processos por trás deles.”

A empresa não pode entregar valor, apenas propostas de valor!

Este é um ponto de vista! E o seu, qual é?

Enjoy it!

 

P&G: A Very Early Open Innovation Adopter by Deb Mills-Scofield

(This post ends the summary of fabulous stories and interactions at the 3rd Open Innovation (OI) Summit at BW’s Center for Innovation & Growth: Practical Challenges of Global Open Innovation featuring P&G on April 21st.)

 

Innovation Myth: Ideas Spread Quickly by Tim Kastelle

When scientists first started talking about Artificial Intelligence in the 1950s and 1960s, a lot of the discussion centred around how to best create AI that would think like people do. This view of AI has dominated our imagination ever since.

 

The Contingent Effect of Absorptive Capacity: An Open Innovation Analysis by Andrew A. King and Karim R. Lakhani  

Does experience with adopting technology improve a person’s capacity for inventing better technology? On the other hand, does invention experience increase the capacity for adoption?

 

How to Create Fantastic Media User Experience by Greg Satell

An American jurist once famously remarked that, although he couldn’t define pornography, he knows it when he sees it.  In other words, porn looks like porn, seedy and crass (or so I’ve heard).  Nobody would mistake it for anything else.

 

The future is podular by Dave Gray

One of the most difficult challenges companies face today is how to be more flexible and adaptive in a dynamic, volatile business environment. How do you build a company that can identify and capitalize on opportunities, navigate around risks and other challenges, and respond quickly to changes in the environment? How do you embed that kind of agility into the DNA of your company?

 

Superstar Leadership: Workplace Damage Control by Meghan Biro

I’ve written lately about various aspects of workplace culture – People are always the number one consideration in my opinion. This topic always directly relates to recruitment and employee retention. It’s inescapable.

 

Presentation: Customer Service, Serious Business? By Wim Rampen

Early february I wrote a post titled: Because it is time you take Customer Service seriously. For my speaking engagement on the 2011 Dutch Customer Contact Days in Utrecht this week, I translated the post into a 30-minute presentation, I’d like to share with you here.

 

Stories From the Field: Insights for Intern Training and Mentoring by Danielle McCulloch

This Story from the Field is based on Fuentek’s real-world experience with training tech transfer interns at a major research university

 

A $300 idea that is priceless by Schumpeter via @ralph_ohr

Applying the world’s business brains to housing the poor

 

From Personalized to Empathetic Technologies by Bradley Kreit via @ariegoldshlager

 

There’s a lot to like about Eli Pariser’s recent TED talk about the ways in which algorithms designed to personalize our experiences of digital information, in effect, put us into information bubbles. In effect, he argues that as sites like Google and Facebook customize and increasingly large percentage of the content we see, we’ll naturally, and without our knowledge, be exposed to a progressively narrower range of new ideas and information.

 

Have a nice week!