Currently viewing the tag: "Tim Kastelle"

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P&G: A Very Early Open Innovation Adopter by Deb Mills-Scofield

(This post ends the summary of fabulous stories and interactions at the 3rd Open Innovation (OI) Summit at BW’s Center for Innovation & Growth: Practical Challenges of Global Open Innovation featuring P&G on April 21st.)

 

Innovation Myth: Ideas Spread Quickly by Tim Kastelle

When scientists first started talking about Artificial Intelligence in the 1950s and 1960s, a lot of the discussion centred around how to best create AI that would think like people do. This view of AI has dominated our imagination ever since.

 

The Contingent Effect of Absorptive Capacity: An Open Innovation Analysis by Andrew A. King and Karim R. Lakhani  

Does experience with adopting technology improve a person’s capacity for inventing better technology? On the other hand, does invention experience increase the capacity for adoption?

 

How to Create Fantastic Media User Experience by Greg Satell

An American jurist once famously remarked that, although he couldn’t define pornography, he knows it when he sees it.  In other words, porn looks like porn, seedy and crass (or so I’ve heard).  Nobody would mistake it for anything else.

 

The future is podular by Dave Gray

One of the most difficult challenges companies face today is how to be more flexible and adaptive in a dynamic, volatile business environment. How do you build a company that can identify and capitalize on opportunities, navigate around risks and other challenges, and respond quickly to changes in the environment? How do you embed that kind of agility into the DNA of your company?

 

Superstar Leadership: Workplace Damage Control by Meghan Biro

I’ve written lately about various aspects of workplace culture – People are always the number one consideration in my opinion. This topic always directly relates to recruitment and employee retention. It’s inescapable.

 

Presentation: Customer Service, Serious Business? By Wim Rampen

Early february I wrote a post titled: Because it is time you take Customer Service seriously. For my speaking engagement on the 2011 Dutch Customer Contact Days in Utrecht this week, I translated the post into a 30-minute presentation, I’d like to share with you here.

 

Stories From the Field: Insights for Intern Training and Mentoring by Danielle McCulloch

This Story from the Field is based on Fuentek’s real-world experience with training tech transfer interns at a major research university

 

A $300 idea that is priceless by Schumpeter via @ralph_ohr

Applying the world’s business brains to housing the poor

 

From Personalized to Empathetic Technologies by Bradley Kreit via @ariegoldshlager

 

There’s a lot to like about Eli Pariser’s recent TED talk about the ways in which algorithms designed to personalize our experiences of digital information, in effect, put us into information bubbles. In effect, he argues that as sites like Google and Facebook customize and increasingly large percentage of the content we see, we’ll naturally, and without our knowledge, be exposed to a progressively narrower range of new ideas and information.

 

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You Get Better at What You Do by Tim Kastelle 

If you want to get better at innovation, you have start innovating more.

That probably sounds obvious, but in practice, not all that many people do it.

I was reminded of this by an interesting post by John Gruber discussing Apple’s transition to cloud computing. It includes this section:

 

10 Divergent Strategies – Break through the Box! By Robyn McMaster

Why is it that creative people tend to break rules? Innovators imagine something that will work better. They don’t like being boxed in, but somehow have a glint in their eyes for the adventure of a challenge. Is that where you see yourself?

 

Why Trends Are For Suckers by Greg Satell

It feels good to be trendy.  You can be sure that you’ll have a lot of company.  And that’s exactly the problem.  It’s easy to go wrong when everybody around you thinks it’s right.

 

Paradox of Innovation & Intellectual Property by Deb Mills-Scofield

Yesterday was the 3rd Open Innovation Summit at BW‘s Center for Innovation & Growth: Practical Challenges of Global Open Innovation featuring P&G.  Too much happened for one post so I’m going to do one on each panelist’s story and discussion, starting with Kelly McDow, Associate General Counsel for P&G’s Connect+Develop.

 

A Cool Neurological Explaination for the Power of Small Wins by Bob Sutton

Regular readers of this blog know that I am a huge fan of the power of small wins, and following Karl Weick’s classic article, have argued in Good Boss, Bad Boss and here at HBR that big hairy goals cause people to freak-out and freeze-up if they aren’t broken down into smaller stepping stones.

 

Seven Steps To Better Brainstorming. Or May Be There Are More. Is Brainstorming The Right Word? By Idris Mootee

Let’s start with this…this is not the best title. I really don’t like the word “brainstorming.” It means a group of people getting together to generate a lot of deas for the solution of a problem.

 

Why Right Brainers Will Rule The Future By Diane Jacobsen

Traditional business thinking has generally followed a linear, compartmentalized process that molded the sum of its various known parts into a logical, pragmatic solution. This process was born primary out of the dawn of manufacturing, which attenuated the sequenced progression, and didn’t allow for continuous discovery, collaboration, rapid prototyping, or integrated thinking.

 

We Have Designed, We Build, You Will Runby by Thierry de Baillon

However we want to call it, Enterprise 2.0, social business or collaborative whatsitsname, what we are watching now is a vendors-claimed increasing evolution toward maturity of leading platforms. During its last symposium, the Gartner Group held a session entitled “Managing Social Software Maturity: Supporting Pioneers and Settlers“, and is predicting a near-billion figure for the social software market in 2011.

 

The Cycle of Innovation (Closing Thoughts) by Paul Williams via Ralph Ohr

Hopefully our step-by-step review of the Continuous Innovation Loop has been helpful.  I wanted to use a separate blog entry to focus on how the individual steps link together.

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12 Sparks for Heads-Up Creativity by Robyn McMaster

Do you find your creativity at a lull and needing a jolt at times?  For extra spark, gain insights from leaders and designers to jump-start your creativity.  Consider the following:

 

Three Steps for Inventing the Future by Tim Kastelle

That’s the idea that framed yesterday’s post – Where’s My Flying Car? I argued that as innovators, our job is to invent the future – and that in doing so, instead of trying to come up with something that has never existed before, like a flying car, we’re better off trying to figure out how things that already exist can be redesigned so that they mean something completely new.

 

Why I’m Glad I Got Fired by Nilofer Merchant via @timkastelle and @ralph_ohr

I came to be an expert on collaboration because Carol Bartz both hired me and fired me — within 18 months. Here’s what happened.

 

Creativity – Risk or Regret? By Ellen Weber

If you agree with Sir Ken Robinson that creativity gets clobbered at school, you’ll likely also agree it takes risk to create and lead a finer future.

 

Making creative connections: What matters is that you make them by Jorge Barba

While there are a lot of organizations that aggregate trends (see Trend Hunter and Trend Watching to name a few), people often ask me how believable those trends are and if they should be arriving at the same conclusions while doing their own trend hunting.

 

Game Mechanics and Landscape Design for Customer Value Creation by  Riitta Raesmaa

I recently met a marketing professional who had seen the “social light”, or should I say Social Business Light. He was stressed about the fact that most of his colleagues and the management “don’t understand the value of social media and what is happening within marketing communication”. Very familiar set up!

 

The Power of Observing and Talking to Real Humans by Bob Sutton

Although Good Boss, Bad Boss focuses more squarely on the relationship between bosses and their immediate charges, one of the main themes of the book — following a design-thinking view of the world — is that the best bosses go to great lengths to develop empathy for both the people they lead and the customers served by their teams and organizations. 

 

“Build to Fail” And “Fail To Build” Can Have Different Meanings. To Fail Is Part Of To Build. To Fail Is To Hep To Build To Last. I Hope I’m Not Confusing You. By Idris Mootee

In London this week, fully packed with meetings. Staying at St. Marins Lane and it is one of my favourite hotels in London. Both for style and location even I am not the saturday night crowd that hangs out in the cocktail lounge. I am getting a lot of work done writing and editing for the next issue of M/I/S/C. Deadline is a few days away.

 

Innovation – Matching Needs and Solutions by Ralph Ohr

While revisiting some collected innovation readings, I recognized that it might be important to briefly emphasize again one “fundamental”: the distinction between needs and solutions.

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Don’t Push Rocks, Roll Snowballs by Tim Kastelle

Innovation is the process of idea management. One of the critical steps to successful innovation is getting your idea to spread. Hugh MacLeod’s outstanding new book Evil Plans has a lot about how to get your ideas to spread more effectively. One of his tenets is that we should create random acts of traction.

 

How to Approach Open Innovation: The 15inno Open Innovation Roadmap by Stefan Lindegaard

As we can define open innovation in many ways, there are also many different approaches to open innovation.

How do you get started? OVO Innovation has developed a topology that builds on two defining attributes. It is a good inspirational starter.

 

No Vision = No Innovation by Jeffrey Phillips

My son shocked my wife last night by announcing that he didn’t think the space program had anything to offer mankind.  He had been assigned a paper in his middle school English class in which he needed to make a provocative point and sustain his argument with facts.

 

Bridging the innovation planning gap by Michael Fruhling

In a 2010 McKinsey survey of over 2,000 corporate executives, 84% said that innovation was very or extremely important to their company’s future growth. However, 40% claimed that they select their new ideas on an ad hoc basis. Further, 57% agreed that while they execute well against the few new ideas that they had… they needed more big ideas.

 

Spanish Princess or Female Conquistador? By Marion Chapsal

Ana Patricia Botin is the woman leader number 8 in my series of Women and 12 Leadership Styles. She represents The Moderator/ Persuader dilemna, with a strong preference for The Moderator, although…I’m not so sure anymore!

 

Why you shouldn’t ignore your customers by Jorge Barba

My blog was offline for two days because my former hosting (got a new one, hurray Blue Host!) shut me down. According to them my blog was using excessive resources and so had to be shut down immediately. In other words, is getting a lot of traffic and we can’t handle you.

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Uma receita especial

Da mesma maneira que nos cansamos de um cozinheiro competente, que faz as nossas refeições sempre com o mesmo sabor e por essa razão, procuramos em nós próprios a incompetência de ser artista na cozinha, também pode haver alguém não competente que cansado da competência queira ser um visionário nos negócios.

“Dê uma olhada nos fóruns de discussão geek e verá uma lista interminável de críticos de língua afiada, cada um deles, preparado para abater uma ideia ou outra. E depois dê uma olhada nas empresas que aparecem nas várias mostras, e verá uma empresa, após a pintura de melhorias incrementais baseadas em suposições actuais.

A razão é simples: os tecnólogos sabem como fazer as coisas funcionarem.

Quando um engenheiro tem uma capacidade comprovada de entregar os produtos, para manter as coisas cantarolando e a bater certo, é fácil cair na armadilha de rejeitar tudo o que não foi demonstrado que pode funcionar, que não foi comprovado no mercado.

Competência não é a mesma coisa que imaginação” – Seth Godin

Eu sempre fui, e sou, um apologista de que existe uma diferença entre competência e qualificação e que esta última não representa necessariamente a primeira. Mas raramente me dou conta que a não competência pode significar estar liberto para imaginar.

Num comentário no meu último post, Tim Kastelle diz :” Eu tenho tendência a concordar com pessoas como Verganti quando eles dizem que temos que ter visão suficiente para desenvolver inovações revolucionárias”. Eu sinto um pouco o mesmo e também concordo com Ralph Ohr quando ele diz (também aí) que “combinar a visão e a integração do consumidor parece ser um pré-requisito prometedor.

Mas par que isso aconteça é preciso que a “elite” visionária vá junto das pessoas e descubra quais os ingredientes necessários para conceber o seu molho especial do futuro.

Segundo Verganti os ingredientes estão lá, à espera de serem utilizados:

E com a difusão de processos de inovação aberta, competições ideias, e assim por diante, os executivos estão cada vez mais expostas a uma variedade de ideias.

O que está em falta, estou com medo, são pensadores visionários, que sejam capazes de dar sentido a esta abundância de estímulos – visionários que irá construir as arenas para libertar o poder das ideias e transformá-las em acções.

Eu penso que a formação de uma visão é baseada em pesquisa e na profunda compreensão do meio ambiente onde pretendemos actuar e para que se possa transformar ideias em acções essa liderança visionária exige uma exploração forte de um sentido.

A grande imagem de uma empresa no futuro só pode ser centrada nos consumidores / utilizadores e nós não podemos pensar no futuro repetindo o passado.

Ao relaxar o nosso papel de competência nas organizações libertamos a nossa imaginação para questionar os consumidores / utilizadores.

“O truque está em ver o futuro antes de ele chegar”, Gary Hamel and C.K. Prahalad, que também indicam três questões a levantar sobre o futuro e a visão que temos dele:

“1. Que novos tipos de benefício para o cliente devemos procurar em cinco, dez ou quinze anos?

2. Que novas competências terão de construir ou adquirir para oferecer esses benefícios aos clientes?

3. Como será que temos de reconfigurar a interface do cliente durante os próximos anos.

Qualquer visão que seja apenas uma extensão do ego do CEO é perigosa.”

Encontrar benefícios é encontrar significado. Identificar novas competências é olhar para o futuro. Reconfigurar o interface é…?

Diga-me o que pensa?

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Redesigned Thinking for Diverse Brains! by Ellen Weber 

Why does design thinking exclude diversity at work, when it could include more brainpower for innovative renewal? Design thinking, according to Dr. Roger Martin – Dean of Rotman School of Management – in a recent HSM online seminar,  calls upon two ways of thinking.

 

All Life is an Experiment by Tim Kastelle

Uncertainty is one thing that makes a lot of people uncomfortable. Unfortunately, in most business situations, uncertainty is a fact of life.

Graham Hill made an interesting response to my post yesterday about simplistic, complex and simple models. He said:

The real world is complex . Most businesses simplify the complexity to ‘manage’ it. Complex is too hard!

 

Social Wolf in Sheep’s Clothing, ready for the Social Business? By Riitta Raesmaa

I recently found my old thesis, and yes, some of its topics and content are (still) relevant, as this one: the evolution of organization and work structures. The very same topic Esko Kilpi is researching. The discussion in my old thesis and Esko’s blog posts inspire me to learn more about this topic.

 

“Have Some Sugar” and Six Other Ways to Be Good: Evidence from BPS Research by Bob Sutton

One of the my favorite blogs on the planet is BPS Research,  where folks from the British Psychological Society summarize the latest psychological research — and do so with delightful charm and accuracy.  I was just visiting (it is a great place to look around) and, as part of just one post, they offer “7 Ways to Be Good.”

 

Find the revolution in constraints by Jorge Barba

Before I fell in love with technology my intent was to become an architect. Because of this I have an acute sensitivity with architects, so when I heard about the ideas of Bjarke Ingels a few years ago I was blown away.

 

Managing the Hype Cycle by Greg Sattel

Should you believe the hype?

Hype, much like the proverbial soldier’s girlfriend, doesn’t exactly lie, but doesn’t tell the whole truth either.  We’re told our whole world will change, lots of journalists and investment bankers drive expectations further and then we are inevitably disappointed.  Only later, we find that, after all, there really was something to it all along.

 

Dan Ariely on irrationality in the workplace McKinsey Quarterly  Via  @ralph_ohr

The behavioral economist explains why executives need to recognize—and embrace—the irrational forces that affect themselves and their employees.

 

The unbearable lightness of design thinking by Guido Stompff

My latest blog: the unbearable lightness of designthinking. It considers 4 contesting paradigms / woldviews on innovation, based on a famous model of Daft and Weick (1984). These paradigms can be explained alongside two axes:

 

Brain Surgery, Corporate Culture & Leadership Consistency by Alicia Arenas

The anticipation, wondering if it was benign or cancerous (it was benign), praying that the neurosurgeon would not suddenly get the shakes, being in a hospital away from home and having no family nearby all added up to make this one of the most stressful experiences I’ve gone through in a long time.

 

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The Art of Integrative Thinking by Roger Martin and Hilary Austen via @ralph_ohr

Modern leadership needs integrative thinking. Integrative thinkers

embrace complexity, tolerate uncertainty, and manage tension in searching for

creative solutions to problems.

 

Adam Smith Explains the Network Economy by Tim Kastelle

The economy is a network. To understand how new ideas integrate into it, we first have to understand how interconnected and interdependent it is. Here is a passage from The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith making this point (from Adam Gopnik’s good review of Smith’s work in The New Yorker):

 

Working With Strangers to Solve Open Innovation Challenges: What’s It Like? By Stefan Lindegaard

In writing and making public presentations about open innovation, I often remind people that while process is important, in the end success comes down to having people with the right mindset and skills. So much can be accomplished when a good team comes together, even when that team consists of experts in various disciplines around the globe who are total strangers to one another.

 

It’s Time for Some New Habits–the Year of the Meaning Organization by Umair Haque

This time of year we tend to subject ourselves to tough review. We zero in on our practices and tendencies and resolve to take up new, positive habits–and, more importantly, to break the bad. It can be a productive exercise if approached with a clear eye and dedicated follow-through. My question: why don’t we subject our institutions to the same ritualistic rigor?

Surprise yourself by Jorge Barba

We all have different likes and dislikes. That’s just how it is. A personal example how is I like video games and although I do have preferences for shooters, sports and espionage; I’ll give any genre a shot.

 

We Need To Change The Way We Use Trash, One Imagination At A Time. It Is About Behavior As Much As Economics. By Idris Mootee

We all love shopping and some do more than other. We love to buy shoes, clothes, electronic gadgets, toys and cameras. We all know we can’t continue on like this, the stuff we buy today is way worse than what we were buying a decade ago, everything has tons of electronic components inside which is really hard to recycle.

 

Team Guidelines From A New Boss: How Can He Make Sure People Live Them? By Bob Sutton

I got a fascinating note from an employee of a big company about the “team norms” that were articulated by his new boss.  I think they are great, but have a crucial question about them. Here they are: 

 

Happy or Valuable New Year? By Deb Mills-Scofield

21st century capitalism is shifting focus from making money to making meaning (ends vs. means, trailing indicators v leading indicators). This is good and necessary.  However, ‘happiness’ is starting to dominate discussions about 21st C capitalism, even in governments’ measures of economic growth

 

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10 Open Innovation Questions for SME’s by Stefan Lindegaard

As a follow-up to my slightly provocative blog post, Why Open Innovation is Not for Small Companies, I have begun looking further into the interesting topic on how small companies can innovate with others

How Ideas Take Flight Fred Sheahan

I love this video lecture from Stanford’s Entrepreneurship Corner. Within it, Jennifer Aaker (Twitter: @aaker) explores the importance of happiness, meaning, and story in successful and powerful social media campaigns. I highly recommend spending an hour of your time on this topic; it’s immensely applicable to any business, education, and nonprofit organization with a need to leverage activism and outreach in a networked world.

 

The Path to Outcome-Driven Innovation by Bryan Mahoney

Innovation does not often come along on its own. As Hemingway might have said, there is no one rule to innovating. Sometimes it comes easily and perfectly; sometimes it’s like drilling through rock and blasting it out with charges.

 

Which Ideas Are the Good Ones? By Tim Kastelle

The New York Times has just published The 10th Annual Year in Ideas. As part of this, they asked Tyler Cowen to comment on the previous reviews. He noted this quote from the introduction to the piece:

 

Who’s Really Innovative? By Gary Hamel

If you were compiling a list of the world’s most innovative companies, which businesses would top your list? No one would be surprised if you picked Google, Apple or Amazon, but what about Wal-Mart? (Huh?) Or PG&E (a utility, for crying out loud)? Surely there must be some mistake! Or how ’bout the Chinese data equipment maker Huawei (umm, who are they)? While a few of these companies might not have made it onto your top 10 list, all of them were featured in Fast Company’s 2010 ranking of innovation all-stars.

 

Leadership vs Management: Tale of the tape by Jorge Barba

After seeing Scott Berkun’s post on innovation vs usability in numbers, I decided to do my own search on Google’s Ngram Viewer and compared four words: innovation, creativity, management and leadership. Graph below or click through to page:

 

Innovation-Inspiring Prizes by Andrea Meyer

Point: Use open innovation challenges and prizes to inspire solutions, participation and collaboration from employees, partners and customers

 

What’s remarkable about innovation by Jeffrey Phillips

Like many of you I participate in the social media world.  That world has opened up new relationships and new sources of information for me that were completely unexpected.  I’ve learned a lot from individuals on Twitter and Facebook and Linkedin, and I’ve become a real believer in the use of social media to support innovation.

 

In Pursuit of the Perfect Brainstorm by David Segal via Ralph-Ohr

Last month, in a small room on the fifth floor of a high-rise building in San Mateo, Calif., three men sat around a table, thinking. The place was wallpapered with Post-it notes, in a riot of colors, plus column after column of index cards pinned to foam boards. Some of the cards had phrases like “space maximizers” or “stuff trackers” written on them.

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Innovate By Hacking Capabilities by Saul Kaplan

Capabilities are the amino acids of innovation.  They are the building blocks that enable value delivery.  Innovation is a better way to deliver value and is often the result of repurposing existing capabilities.

 

Harnessing Ignorance to Spark Creativity by Bob Sutton via Ralph-Ohr

I just got an email from a writer who was checking to see if I had argued — in a talk long ago — that true innovations come from people who ignore customers.

Passion and Wisdom by John Hagel

Passion and wisdom. Youth and age.  Most of us would say that these are two ends of the spectrum.  Many say that one can either be passionate or wise, but not both.  Passion typically prevails in one’s youth while wisdom gains prominence with age and experience.

 

The Opposition Strategy by Jorge Barba

One great way to stand out and differentiate is to do the opposite of what everyone else is doing. An opposition strategy is usually the result of challenging long held assumptions of how things are done, this is the domain of us ‘crazies’ who question authority.

 

The Role of Strategy by Tim Kastelle

There is a terrific quote in Creative Disruption by Simon Waldman about strategy. It is from Markus Reckling, the Managing Director of Corporate Development for Deutsche Post – here’s the quote plus Waldman’s interpretation:

 

This Is Your Brain on Metaphors by ROBERT SAPOLSKY via Riita Raesmaa

Despite rumors to the contrary, there are many ways in which the human brain isn’t all that fancy. Let’s compare it to the nervous system of a fruit fly. Both are made up of cells, of course, with neurons playing particularly important roles.

Great Advice on Open Innovation from Intuit by Stefan Lindegaard

A few weeks back, I wrote a blog post, From Archer to Magnet: A Good Goal for Open Innovation, which was based on a recent meeting with Jan Bosch, VP of Open Innovation at Intuit.

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Making Room for Reflection Is a Strategic Imperative by Umair Haque via @ralph_ohr

Business is, above all, busy. And maybe it’s too busy.

Let’s face it. Most of us spend most of our time chasing the immediate reward, the short-run “objective,” the near-term “goal — in short, the expedient and the convenient.

Innovation – Doing the Impossible with No Resources by Jeffrey Phillips

During this most recent downturn, but similarly to other downturns, at least while I’ve been in the workforce, is the concept of “doing more with less” – that is, wringing more output or benefits out of the same, or often even less, inputs and resources

Currency of 21st Century Business? Connections by Deb Mills-Scofield

Sitting behind me at BIF-6 was this nice, unassuming guy.  We struck up a conversation.  As a result, a wonderful friendship has developed (which is easy to do at BIF). This guy was Michael Lee Stallard.

The Mindset and Key Skills Needed for Successful Innovation by Stefan Lindegaard

In my talks, I like to get into discussions on why we need to update our mindset and key skills in order to become successful at innovation. Below, I have given a couple of reasons as well as some suggestions on the key skills we need to develop.

Is Innovation Expensive? By Paul Sloane

How can companies afford to allocate scarce resources to innovation in these unprecedented times. When every extraneous expenditure is cut back to preserve cash flow how can it be justified to lavish money on

 

The Innovation Matrix: People or Tools? By Tim Kastelle

I had lunch last week with some managers from a company that is trying to improve their innovation performance. They kept asking me what tools should they be using to do this? Is there software that will help, or a process, or some other tool? I had to explain that there are a lot of tools available, but that first you have to figure out your innovation strengths and weaknesses.

The Two Dimensions of Market Orientation by Ralph Christian Ohr

Recently, I was reading an interesting HBR article, named: “Meeting the Apple Game of Customer Perception” by Ndubuisi Ekekwe.

The key paragraphs for me were:

How Are You Smart for Innovation Era? By Ellen Weber

The new innovation era builds on different talents – those overlooked by exclusive practices that limit  wealth for grabbers at the top.

Have a nice week!