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You Get Better at What You Do by Tim Kastelle 

If you want to get better at innovation, you have start innovating more.

That probably sounds obvious, but in practice, not all that many people do it.

I was reminded of this by an interesting post by John Gruber discussing Apple’s transition to cloud computing. It includes this section:

 

10 Divergent Strategies – Break through the Box! By Robyn McMaster

Why is it that creative people tend to break rules? Innovators imagine something that will work better. They don’t like being boxed in, but somehow have a glint in their eyes for the adventure of a challenge. Is that where you see yourself?

 

Why Trends Are For Suckers by Greg Satell

It feels good to be trendy.  You can be sure that you’ll have a lot of company.  And that’s exactly the problem.  It’s easy to go wrong when everybody around you thinks it’s right.

 

Paradox of Innovation & Intellectual Property by Deb Mills-Scofield

Yesterday was the 3rd Open Innovation Summit at BW‘s Center for Innovation & Growth: Practical Challenges of Global Open Innovation featuring P&G.  Too much happened for one post so I’m going to do one on each panelist’s story and discussion, starting with Kelly McDow, Associate General Counsel for P&G’s Connect+Develop.

 

A Cool Neurological Explaination for the Power of Small Wins by Bob Sutton

Regular readers of this blog know that I am a huge fan of the power of small wins, and following Karl Weick’s classic article, have argued in Good Boss, Bad Boss and here at HBR that big hairy goals cause people to freak-out and freeze-up if they aren’t broken down into smaller stepping stones.

 

Seven Steps To Better Brainstorming. Or May Be There Are More. Is Brainstorming The Right Word? By Idris Mootee

Let’s start with this…this is not the best title. I really don’t like the word “brainstorming.” It means a group of people getting together to generate a lot of deas for the solution of a problem.

 

Why Right Brainers Will Rule The Future By Diane Jacobsen

Traditional business thinking has generally followed a linear, compartmentalized process that molded the sum of its various known parts into a logical, pragmatic solution. This process was born primary out of the dawn of manufacturing, which attenuated the sequenced progression, and didn’t allow for continuous discovery, collaboration, rapid prototyping, or integrated thinking.

 

We Have Designed, We Build, You Will Runby by Thierry de Baillon

However we want to call it, Enterprise 2.0, social business or collaborative whatsitsname, what we are watching now is a vendors-claimed increasing evolution toward maturity of leading platforms. During its last symposium, the Gartner Group held a session entitled “Managing Social Software Maturity: Supporting Pioneers and Settlers“, and is predicting a near-billion figure for the social software market in 2011.

 

The Cycle of Innovation (Closing Thoughts) by Paul Williams via Ralph Ohr

Hopefully our step-by-step review of the Continuous Innovation Loop has been helpful.  I wanted to use a separate blog entry to focus on how the individual steps link together.

 Have a nice week!