Currently viewing the tag: "Ronald Bailey"

 

Enjoy it!

 

Renaissance.. by Wim  Rampen

This morning I was listening to news coverage on the Oslo attack.. I don’t have this often, nor soon, but shivers continue to go down my spine listening to survivor stories and even when thinking about them..

 

Systems Intelligence, Serendipity and Listening for the Better Decisions by Riitta Raesmaa

I’ve earlier blogged about how I find intuition and seeing the value of the tacit knowledge as very interesting perspectives for the decision-making.

 

How Social Network Analysis Solves Real World Problems by Greg Satell

I’m LinkedIn.  I’ve got friends on Facebook.  I tweet.  Yo, I got stooopid Klout!  Look at me!  I’m connected!

And so are you and lots of other things, like ecosystems, molecules, our bodies’ metabolisms, the list goes on.

 

Innovation as a Means for Economic Evolution by Paul Hobcraft

Economic growth is an outcome of the innovation trajectory we set. Today managing innovation is complex; often success is measured and valued by the creative destruction of others.

 

Paradox of Innovation & Status Quo by Deborah Mills Scofield

As much as I love change, innovation, #RCUS (Random Collisions of Unusual Suspects per Saul Kaplan) and challenging the Status Quo, I realized how much the comfort and haven of some Status Quo means to me as we got settled at our place in Maine. 

 

In the Eye of the Beholder by Jason Plaks via Ralp Ohr

Imagine two people, Jim and John. Jim planned to succeed in business and accomplished his goal through a series of deliberate steps. John fell into the exact same business success through serendipity and coincidence.

 

A Trick of the Mind by Ronald Bailey

Superstitions arise as the result of the spurious identification of patterns. Even pigeons are superstitious. In an experiment where food is delivered randomly, pigeons will note what they were doing when the pellet arrived, such as twirling to the left and then pecking a button, and perform the maneuver over and over until the next pellet arrives

 

Bust Your Innovation Myths by Art Markman

It is common to tell stories of great discoveries. Hundreds of years later, we still talk about Galileo Galilei dropping balls of different weights off the Leaning Tower of Pisa to shatter existing beliefs about the way objects fall

 

Nothing kills an idea faster than common sense by Luke Williams

In his book This Means This, This Means That, Sean Hall asks readers to vote on which of two sentences is the best. “The cat sat on the mat.,” or “The cat sat on the dog’s mat?”

I know that may sound painfully simple, but it illustrates the point beautifully.

 

Have a nice week!