Currently viewing the tag: "Riitta Raesmaa"

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Beyond the Social Network: Tips for Engaging Professional Relationships to Last a Lifetime by Gary Polsky

It used to be that you met someone at a meeting or a mixer, had a real conversation with them, perhaps saw them again at a luncheon, exchanged an email or phone conversation, and eventually, developed those initial interactions into a long-term business relationship.

Innovation and Social Leadership by Riitta Raesmaa

My brain is bubbling after the TEDxHelsinki event – a creatively built lineup of innovative speakers. The themes were exactly those I’ve been working on lately: Entrepreneurship, innovation, age & generations, and leadership. So here are random thoughts I’d like to share.

Lee Chipman: I Can Do Anything by Whitney Johnson

Lee Chipman is a busy mother of five girls. When she’s not baking, cleaning or helping with homework, she enjoys decorating her home.

 

Get Your Process Right to Innovate Successfully by Tim Kastelle

Ideally, you’ll have both. But I suspect that if it’s either/or, process wins.

There is an interesting example from the world of chess in Michael Nielsen’s fantastic new book Reinventing Discovery: The New Era of Networked Science. The book discusses how our improved ability to network via the internet is changing the face of science. It’s an interesting book, and also an important one and I recommend it highly.

Deconstructing the Design Thinker by Sohrab Vossoughi via Ralph-Ohr

The term ‘design thinking’ has lost some of its lustre of late, particularly in business publications. In my view, this is the natural result of throwing around a term with a bit too much enthusiasm and not enough understanding, and it is truly unfortunate, because the qualities it describes have never been more important.

 

The Future by Design by Greg Satell

The future has a nice ring to it.  It is fairly busting with promise.  We can let our dreams run wild, imagine that some of the bullshit we currently have to endure will subside and that cool new things will replace boring old ones.

 

Sketchnotes of Ezio Manzini at School of the Art Institute of Chicago by Craighton Berman

This past Monday evening, on an unseasonably warm night in Chicago, sustainability expert Ezio Manzini gave a thought-provoking lecture at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. Mr Manzini is a Professor of Industrial Design at Politecnico Milano, and is a renowned expert in the application of strategic design for sustainability.

Why We Cannot Perceive the World Objectively by Michael Michalko

People tend to think of perception as a passive process. We see, hear, smell, taste or feel stimuli that impinge upon our senses. We think that if we are at all objective, we record what is actually there.

 

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The Crisis of Meaning in the Millennial Workforce by Megan Erickson

What’s the Big Idea?

For all the talk of trailblazing, the most successful businesses of the 20th century made it to the top by maintaining an edge in the same singular pursuit: maximizing shareholder value.

The Marvels and the Flaws of Intuitive Thinking by Daniel Kahneman via Ralph Ohr

“The power of settings, the power of priming, and the power of unconscious thinking, all of those are a major change in psychology. I can’t think of a bigger change in my lifetime. You were asking what’s exciting? That’s exciting, to me.”

Can mastery and innovation coexist? By Jorge Barba

Jonathan Fields posted this question in a Psychology Today article last week. Here is my answer and would love to hear yours.

It’s a great question and not at all difficult to answer, though it’s better said than done. First of all, mastery is never achieved. It’s a goal, but a goal we’ll never reach.

The Finnish Awesomeness and Entrepreneurship by Riitta Raesmaa

Something exceptional is happening here in Finland. However I think that the foundation for that has existed a long time, only to wait its time to come. And it seems that the time is here and now. Let me explain.

 

IDEO: Big Innovation Lives Right on the Edge of Ridiculous Ideas by Jake Cook

Imagine for a second if you could somehow wrap up the creative chaos of a kindergartner’s life and apply it at work. You’d go on field trips, make stuff, hatch crazy ideas, and be awed by the world on a daily basis. Sound ridiculous? At the renowned international design consultancy IDEO, it’s how work gets done every day.

 

Co-Creating Business Models by Deborah Mills-Scofield

In 2009,  I was privileged to co-create an awesome book, Business Model Generation, with Alex Osterwalder and Yves Pigneur.     Co-creating the book with Alex was an amazing experience, created some lasting friendships with other co-creators, and of course Alex.  After Angela Dunn‘s monthly twitter-chat, #ideachat, I decided to ask Alex what made him decide to do co-create this book:

The 10 Most Important Trends in Business by Haydn Shaughnessy

What is the single most important trend in business today? If there was a beauty contest or an arm wrestle to decide, then the big surprise would be the sheer number of contestants.

5 Things You Need To Know About (Social) CRM (Definitions) by Wim Rampen

I think trying to define something is a very good exercise to understand what you are dealing with or what you are trying to do it for. It also helps to communicate internally. And regardless of what many say, I don’t think there are enough definitions of (Social) CRM, at least not good ones.. But that is a personal opinion, not relevant to today’s post.

Building a Better Business by Design by RAYLENE KNUTSON

Are you a business that wants to innovate? Think like a designer. That’s the message from a growing number of consultants, business leaders, policy makers and educators who think companies need to swap obsessive analytics for more right-brain experimentation.

When Working Memory Kicks In by Ellen Weber

Unless looking for lost golf balls, that hold up games –  stay with a thing until you find it. The brain’s working memory kicks in to land life-changing dreams, when you GO FOR IT. On the flip side of waiting for windfalls – winners run with What if … possibilities – and working memory lands new deals.

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The Finnish Awesomeness and Entrepreneurship by Riitta Raesmaa

Something exceptional is happening here in Finland. However I think that the foundation for that has existed a long time, only to wait its time to come. And it seems that the time is here and now. Let me explain.

Who’s Next – A spotlight on innovative thinkers who are changing the future of business. FastCompany via Ralph-Ohr

We’re helping people make decisions faster and in a better way,” says Christy Liu, cofounder and director of marketing at Wanderfly. “We’re also getting people to travel more. The whole idea of the site is about inspriation, so what we hope to do and what we are already doing is is getting people sort of off their bums and traveling the world.

The Customer Is Always Wrong by Wim Rampen

I think the Customer is wrong many more times than she’s right..

Customers don’t fill out (online) forms like they should, they don’t read the terms and conditions when they buy, they are wrong about what they thought they read (somewhere), about how to use your product and how to maintain it..

 

Co-Creating Business Models by Deborah Mills-Scofield

In 2009,  I was privileged to co-create an awesome book, Business Model Generation, with Alex Osterwalder and Yves Pigneur.     Co-creating the book with Alex was an amazing experience, created some lasting friendships with other co-creators, and of course Alex.  After Angela Dunn‘s monthly twitter-chat, #ideachat, I decided to ask Alex what made him decide to do co-create this book:

Your Customers’ Big Irritation is a Big Opportunity by Arie Goldshlager

I found this Don Sull  “top 10” field guide to clues for hidden breakthrough opportunities article packed full of instructive observations. Please note particularly:

 

Let’s Be A Little More Creative About Creativity. And What Does Collective Creativiry Means? By Idris Mootee

Scholarly interest in creativity ranges widely: Topics to which it is relevant include the relationship between creativity and general intelligence; the mental and neurological processes associated with creative activity; the relationship between personality type and creative ability; the relationship between creativity and mental health;

The Fat File by Patti Blackstaffe

Do you keep a file that holds all of the awards, recognition and comments made to you about your performance?  I do.  I keep everything written about my performance by the companies for whom I have worked in addition to the customers and clients I have served and I call it my Fat File.

How to Perform Under Pressure by Greg Satell

Okay, it’s your big day.  Everything is on the line.  All of your blood and sweat has led up to this point and now it really matters.  What happens next is up to you.

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Renaissance.. by Wim  Rampen

This morning I was listening to news coverage on the Oslo attack.. I don’t have this often, nor soon, but shivers continue to go down my spine listening to survivor stories and even when thinking about them..

 

Systems Intelligence, Serendipity and Listening for the Better Decisions by Riitta Raesmaa

I’ve earlier blogged about how I find intuition and seeing the value of the tacit knowledge as very interesting perspectives for the decision-making.

 

How Social Network Analysis Solves Real World Problems by Greg Satell

I’m LinkedIn.  I’ve got friends on Facebook.  I tweet.  Yo, I got stooopid Klout!  Look at me!  I’m connected!

And so are you and lots of other things, like ecosystems, molecules, our bodies’ metabolisms, the list goes on.

 

Innovation as a Means for Economic Evolution by Paul Hobcraft

Economic growth is an outcome of the innovation trajectory we set. Today managing innovation is complex; often success is measured and valued by the creative destruction of others.

 

Paradox of Innovation & Status Quo by Deborah Mills Scofield

As much as I love change, innovation, #RCUS (Random Collisions of Unusual Suspects per Saul Kaplan) and challenging the Status Quo, I realized how much the comfort and haven of some Status Quo means to me as we got settled at our place in Maine. 

 

In the Eye of the Beholder by Jason Plaks via Ralp Ohr

Imagine two people, Jim and John. Jim planned to succeed in business and accomplished his goal through a series of deliberate steps. John fell into the exact same business success through serendipity and coincidence.

 

A Trick of the Mind by Ronald Bailey

Superstitions arise as the result of the spurious identification of patterns. Even pigeons are superstitious. In an experiment where food is delivered randomly, pigeons will note what they were doing when the pellet arrived, such as twirling to the left and then pecking a button, and perform the maneuver over and over until the next pellet arrives

 

Bust Your Innovation Myths by Art Markman

It is common to tell stories of great discoveries. Hundreds of years later, we still talk about Galileo Galilei dropping balls of different weights off the Leaning Tower of Pisa to shatter existing beliefs about the way objects fall

 

Nothing kills an idea faster than common sense by Luke Williams

In his book This Means This, This Means That, Sean Hall asks readers to vote on which of two sentences is the best. “The cat sat on the mat.,” or “The cat sat on the dog’s mat?”

I know that may sound painfully simple, but it illustrates the point beautifully.

 

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Design Thinking Is Failed Experiment? How Can That Be Because The Experiments Have Barely Started? Bruce, Not Too Fast! By Idris Mootee

This is my response to Bruce Nussbaum’s lastest Fast Company’s blog declaring “Design Thinking” is over and that he is moving on to something new. He is calling it “Creative Quotient” which is really his new book, I was wondering why he would make that statement.

 

Mental Bodybuilding for Knowledge Workers by Riitta Raesmaa

I stumbled upon a beautiful video about Michael Wolff, an acknowledged British graphic designer. I am not a part of the design professionals’ clan, but his message touched me. I think his way of thinking is applicable to all of us knowledge workers who are trying to cope with the changing work environment.

 

Is subtractive thinking the new normal? By Jorge barba

Apple is on everybody’s minds these days. Yesterday, along with my partner and new team member ( @dario_rivera), I was talking to a client about a few observations we had about some processes in their restaurant operation and how we think they are creating bottlenecks.

 

Innovation Without Entrepreneurship Doesn’t Make A Lucrative Business by Andrew Penny via @ralph_ohr

A lot has been said about creating an Innovative Culture. Research labs, government departments and agencies are all trying to figure out just how to make us innovate. The thought being that innovation equals wealth creation.

 

Understanding the Language of Innovation by H. James Wilson via @ariegoldshlager

We all know innovation has its own language conventions, rich with revolutions, evolutions, ecosystems, and more. This may seem like a harmless dialect that simply reflects the nature of the work.

 

Structure, Agency and Open Innovation by Greg Sattel

As a young student, Nobel laureate Eugene Wigner took up physics because he felt stupid in math class.  John von Neumann, his classmate at the Fasori Gimnázium and one of the great mathematical geniuses of the 20th century, was simply in another league.

 

The Antibodies Sitting in the Innovation Petri Dish by Paul Hobcraft

For many years I’ve been fascinated by these ‘Corporate Antibodies’ that we find in that classic management pathology that instinctively rejects and refuses to alter its ways, so as to protect itself.

 

The AIR Model (Action, Intention, Result)by Sinan Alhir

Human nature and every human endeavor can generally be explored as a Meaningfully-Purposeful Enterprise relative to two dimensions, a system dimension and a socio-cultural dimension, with hundreds if not thousands of perspectives/paradigms, models, bodies of knowledge, etc.

 

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12 Sparks for Heads-Up Creativity by Robyn McMaster

Do you find your creativity at a lull and needing a jolt at times?  For extra spark, gain insights from leaders and designers to jump-start your creativity.  Consider the following:

 

Three Steps for Inventing the Future by Tim Kastelle

That’s the idea that framed yesterday’s post – Where’s My Flying Car? I argued that as innovators, our job is to invent the future – and that in doing so, instead of trying to come up with something that has never existed before, like a flying car, we’re better off trying to figure out how things that already exist can be redesigned so that they mean something completely new.

 

Why I’m Glad I Got Fired by Nilofer Merchant via @timkastelle and @ralph_ohr

I came to be an expert on collaboration because Carol Bartz both hired me and fired me — within 18 months. Here’s what happened.

 

Creativity – Risk or Regret? By Ellen Weber

If you agree with Sir Ken Robinson that creativity gets clobbered at school, you’ll likely also agree it takes risk to create and lead a finer future.

 

Making creative connections: What matters is that you make them by Jorge Barba

While there are a lot of organizations that aggregate trends (see Trend Hunter and Trend Watching to name a few), people often ask me how believable those trends are and if they should be arriving at the same conclusions while doing their own trend hunting.

 

Game Mechanics and Landscape Design for Customer Value Creation by  Riitta Raesmaa

I recently met a marketing professional who had seen the “social light”, or should I say Social Business Light. He was stressed about the fact that most of his colleagues and the management “don’t understand the value of social media and what is happening within marketing communication”. Very familiar set up!

 

The Power of Observing and Talking to Real Humans by Bob Sutton

Although Good Boss, Bad Boss focuses more squarely on the relationship between bosses and their immediate charges, one of the main themes of the book — following a design-thinking view of the world — is that the best bosses go to great lengths to develop empathy for both the people they lead and the customers served by their teams and organizations. 

 

“Build to Fail” And “Fail To Build” Can Have Different Meanings. To Fail Is Part Of To Build. To Fail Is To Hep To Build To Last. I Hope I’m Not Confusing You. By Idris Mootee

In London this week, fully packed with meetings. Staying at St. Marins Lane and it is one of my favourite hotels in London. Both for style and location even I am not the saturday night crowd that hangs out in the cocktail lounge. I am getting a lot of work done writing and editing for the next issue of M/I/S/C. Deadline is a few days away.

 

Innovation – Matching Needs and Solutions by Ralph Ohr

While revisiting some collected innovation readings, I recognized that it might be important to briefly emphasize again one “fundamental”: the distinction between needs and solutions.

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Redesigned Thinking for Diverse Brains! by Ellen Weber 

Why does design thinking exclude diversity at work, when it could include more brainpower for innovative renewal? Design thinking, according to Dr. Roger Martin – Dean of Rotman School of Management – in a recent HSM online seminar,  calls upon two ways of thinking.

 

All Life is an Experiment by Tim Kastelle

Uncertainty is one thing that makes a lot of people uncomfortable. Unfortunately, in most business situations, uncertainty is a fact of life.

Graham Hill made an interesting response to my post yesterday about simplistic, complex and simple models. He said:

The real world is complex . Most businesses simplify the complexity to ‘manage’ it. Complex is too hard!

 

Social Wolf in Sheep’s Clothing, ready for the Social Business? By Riitta Raesmaa

I recently found my old thesis, and yes, some of its topics and content are (still) relevant, as this one: the evolution of organization and work structures. The very same topic Esko Kilpi is researching. The discussion in my old thesis and Esko’s blog posts inspire me to learn more about this topic.

 

“Have Some Sugar” and Six Other Ways to Be Good: Evidence from BPS Research by Bob Sutton

One of the my favorite blogs on the planet is BPS Research,  where folks from the British Psychological Society summarize the latest psychological research — and do so with delightful charm and accuracy.  I was just visiting (it is a great place to look around) and, as part of just one post, they offer “7 Ways to Be Good.”

 

Find the revolution in constraints by Jorge Barba

Before I fell in love with technology my intent was to become an architect. Because of this I have an acute sensitivity with architects, so when I heard about the ideas of Bjarke Ingels a few years ago I was blown away.

 

Managing the Hype Cycle by Greg Sattel

Should you believe the hype?

Hype, much like the proverbial soldier’s girlfriend, doesn’t exactly lie, but doesn’t tell the whole truth either.  We’re told our whole world will change, lots of journalists and investment bankers drive expectations further and then we are inevitably disappointed.  Only later, we find that, after all, there really was something to it all along.

 

Dan Ariely on irrationality in the workplace McKinsey Quarterly  Via  @ralph_ohr

The behavioral economist explains why executives need to recognize—and embrace—the irrational forces that affect themselves and their employees.

 

The unbearable lightness of design thinking by Guido Stompff

My latest blog: the unbearable lightness of designthinking. It considers 4 contesting paradigms / woldviews on innovation, based on a famous model of Daft and Weick (1984). These paradigms can be explained alongside two axes:

 

Brain Surgery, Corporate Culture & Leadership Consistency by Alicia Arenas

The anticipation, wondering if it was benign or cancerous (it was benign), praying that the neurosurgeon would not suddenly get the shakes, being in a hospital away from home and having no family nearby all added up to make this one of the most stressful experiences I’ve gone through in a long time.

 

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Reinventing Management – A Process by Deb Mills-Scofield

As we look around us, 20th C regimes, institutions and businesses are failing.  It seems everyone is writing a book on management needs to change.

 

Unlocking your creativity to fulfill your personal vision by  Jorge Barba

I love this! Talk about freeing your mind, here’s a high powered conversation you don’t want to miss…

 

Building Creative Collaboration by Greg Satell

Soft power, noted Joseph Nye, is the power to get what you want without coercion.  That’s a good kind of power to have, but hard to define.  Nye argues that it is a combination of lots of things, like economic success, technological prowess, good governance, lack of corruption, etc.

 

A lesson about (de)motivating employees by Dan Ariely via @ralph_ohr

A few months ago an ex-student of mine, who was at the time working for a big software company, contacted me and asked me to meet with her and her team later in the summer.

 

Taking Work-Life Balance By The Horns by Judy Martin

A colleague recently told me she was suffering from anxiety about heading back to work, after a week off.  In gory detail, she described a nightmare in which her manager littered her office with big black hairy spiders. Pretty much how she feels at work, she effused.  “The creepy crawlies never seem to go away.”

 

I am a Knowledge Worker and a Serendipity Hippie by Riitta Raesmaa

Last weekend I attended Professor Esa Saarinen’s seminar, and as always I was touched and inspired by his thinking. Few days earlier futurist Jarno M. Koponen wrote a beautiful blog post about creative future thinking. Both of these gentlemen touched on a question I’ve been thinking lately:

What metrics should we apply for open innovation? By Stefan Lindegaard

I hear more and more requests on how to apply metrics to open innovation.

Personally, I do not really believe in metrics. The innovation community (companies, consultants and academics) has tried this for the last 20 years on innovation in general, but no success.

 

The Next Time You Pick Up The Phone To Call A Customer Service Agent You Might End Up Talking To An Inmate In Tijar, India by  Idris Mootee

Global customer servicing outsourcing is touching us everyday and sometimes you don’t know who you’re talking to on the phone or online when you call your service provider.

 

Is Open Innovation Sustainable? Video Interview with Henry Chesbrough

Professor Henry Chesbrough speaks with Gary Hamel,Visiting Professor of Strategic and International Management at the London Business School and Director of the Management Lab.

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