Currently viewing the tag: "Paul Sloane"

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Making Room for Reflection Is a Strategic Imperative by Umair Haque via @ralph_ohr

Business is, above all, busy. And maybe it’s too busy.

Let’s face it. Most of us spend most of our time chasing the immediate reward, the short-run “objective,” the near-term “goal — in short, the expedient and the convenient.

Innovation – Doing the Impossible with No Resources by Jeffrey Phillips

During this most recent downturn, but similarly to other downturns, at least while I’ve been in the workforce, is the concept of “doing more with less” – that is, wringing more output or benefits out of the same, or often even less, inputs and resources

Currency of 21st Century Business? Connections by Deb Mills-Scofield

Sitting behind me at BIF-6 was this nice, unassuming guy.  We struck up a conversation.  As a result, a wonderful friendship has developed (which is easy to do at BIF). This guy was Michael Lee Stallard.

The Mindset and Key Skills Needed for Successful Innovation by Stefan Lindegaard

In my talks, I like to get into discussions on why we need to update our mindset and key skills in order to become successful at innovation. Below, I have given a couple of reasons as well as some suggestions on the key skills we need to develop.

Is Innovation Expensive? By Paul Sloane

How can companies afford to allocate scarce resources to innovation in these unprecedented times. When every extraneous expenditure is cut back to preserve cash flow how can it be justified to lavish money on

 

The Innovation Matrix: People or Tools? By Tim Kastelle

I had lunch last week with some managers from a company that is trying to improve their innovation performance. They kept asking me what tools should they be using to do this? Is there software that will help, or a process, or some other tool? I had to explain that there are a lot of tools available, but that first you have to figure out your innovation strengths and weaknesses.

The Two Dimensions of Market Orientation by Ralph Christian Ohr

Recently, I was reading an interesting HBR article, named: “Meeting the Apple Game of Customer Perception” by Ndubuisi Ekekwe.

The key paragraphs for me were:

How Are You Smart for Innovation Era? By Ellen Weber

The new innovation era builds on different talents – those overlooked by exclusive practices that limit  wealth for grabbers at the top.

Have a nice week!

(Texto em Português depois deste)

 

How much can it not cost!

When it comes to innovation we also means that companies need to rethink their business as providers and as receivers.

The way forward is to leave the traditional delivery of products and services and to move towards “experiences”.

This can and should be the aspiration of small and medium enterprises in open innovation.

“The treadmill of ever more similar products coming at an ever-faster pace is a race that very few can hope to win.” …

Invite those customers into your own innovation process, and don’t stop there: open up your innovation process more generally to get the best ideas and technologies from others for your own business model, and let others use your innovations in their business models.” Henry Chesbrough

This could be part of the answer to:

– What an organization needs to meet its growth objectives?

For an organization to open up their process of innovation it needs tools and processes to explore effectively the opportunities.

To explore opportunities organizations had to identify needs and for this there are a number of good practices that can be studied in order to find that one wich provides a better adaptation in the context of each organization.

Bad practices also provide a good learning avoiding unnecessary trials.

Best practices are always indexed to a particular situation and are therefore not transferable.

When an organization has identified its needs must then find the resources to meet them. If resources are not available internally they need to locate overseas, and underlying the need for a relationship based on trust and knowledge.

One, of the possible obstacles that arise, when companies are convinced that, to achieve the desired objectives they have to go outside, is the assumption that high financial burden.

However, and according to Paul Sloane, there is a sensible approach to realize about how much the cost of innovation, particularly for small and medium enterprises.

Some costs are greatly reduced as a result of the fundamental processes of communication to disseminate vision, objectives, ask questions and receive answers.

There are a number of important activities to be developed under the surveillance opportunities and participation in internal and external transfer of explicit and tacit knowledge that does not require high financing costs.

Reinventing processes that do not require extraordinary acquisitions of technology or people to implement these technologies is one possible direction, but also may be reinventing the business model.  

It is important that open innovation is also dedicated to innovation in management and that the mood is indeed open to collaboration to enable a knowledge transfer absorbable.

Leaders must keep the big vision that begins with an internal culture of innovation without compromising dreams.

 

Entregar “experiências” em Inovação Aberta

O quanto pode não custar!

Quando se fala de inovação também se quer dizer que as empresas precisam de repensar o seu negócio como fornecedores e como receptores.

O caminho passa por deixar a tradicional entrega de produtos e serviços e passar a fornecer experiências.

Esta pode e deve ser a aspiração das pequenas e médias empresas em inovação aberta.

“A esteira de produtos cada vez mais semelhantes que vêm num ritmo cada vez mais rápido é uma corrida que muito poucos podem esperar ganhar…

Convide os clientes para o seu próprio processo de inovação, e não pare por aí: abra o seu processo de inovação em termos mais gerais para obter as melhores ideias e tecnologias de outros para o seu próprio modelo de negócio, e deixe que os outros usem as suas inovações em seus modelos de negócio.” Henry Chesbrough

Esta poderia ser parte da resposta a:

– O que é que uma organização precisa para satisfazer os seus objectivos de crescimento?

Para uma organização abrir o seu processo de inovação ela precisa de ferramentas e processos que lhe permitam explorar de forma eficaz as oportunidades.

Para as explorar ela precisa de identificar as necessidades e para isso existem um conjunto de boas práticas que podem ser estudadas no sentido de encontrar a que se proporciona melhor a uma adaptação no contexto de cada organização.

As más práticas também proporcionam uma boa aprendizagem evitando experimentações desnecessárias.

As melhores práticas são sempre indexadas a uma situação específica e não são portanto transferíveis.

Quando uma organização já identificou as suas necessidades deve então encontrar os recursos necessários para as satisfazer. Se os recursos não estão disponíveis internamente há que os localizar no exterior, tendo subjacente a necessidade de um relacionamento baseado em conhecimento e confiança.

Um dos possíveis obstáculos que se colocam, quando as empresas estão convictas de que, para atingirem os objectivos desejados têm de recorrer ao exterior, é o pressuposto de que isso acarreta encargos financeiros elevados.

No entanto, e segundo Paul Sloane, há uma abordagem sensata a realizar quanto aos custos da inovação, particularmente no caso das pequenas e médias empresas.

Alguns custos são extremamente reduzidos como os resultantes de processos de comunicação fundamentais para divulgar visão e objectivos ou fazer perguntas e receber respostas.

Há um conjunto de acções importantes a desenvolver no âmbito da vigilância de oportunidades e da participação interna e externa na transferência de conhecimento explícito e tácito que não requer encargos financeiros elevados.

O reinventar processos que não exijam aquisições extraordinárias de tecnologia ou pessoas para aplicarem essas tecnologias é uma direcção possível como também poderá ser a reinvenção do modelo de negócio.  

È importante que a inovação aberta esteja também dedicada á inovação em gestão e que o estado de espírito seja de facto de abertura à colaboração para possibilitar uma transferência de conhecimento absorvível.

Os líderes devem manter a grande visão que comece por uma cultura de inovação interna sem hipotecar os sonhos.

 

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HR’s Strategic Role in Innovation by Deb Mills-Scofield

Historically, HR has not played a very strategic role in innovation.  This needs to change.  HR needs to support the culture change to enable innovation; and the upcoming generation isn’t going to settle for an ‘administrative-only’ role.

On happiness and value innovation by JORGE BARBA

I’ve been thinking about and pounding you in this blog with the idea of not wasting people’s time (also see here). I found out two things today, one is that I’m not the only one thinking about it and second that recent research says that in order for people to be happy we like to spend a certain amount of time on some activities.

Why smaller companies should embrace open innovation by Stefan Lindegaard

 Open innovation at small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) presents both great opportunities and great challenges. Forming open innovation relationships can give a growing enterprise access to resources that might normally are beyond their reach with the potential for greatly speeding up time to market.

How to Improve Your Innovation Metrics by Tim Kastelle

We’ve written a few posts criticising some of the more common innovation metrics in use, so I thought it would be smart to outline some ways that we can actually develop more effective metrics. Here’s a story that might help:

There Is Texting For Business, Texting For Emergency, Texting For Health, Texting For Love And Texting For Seduction. We Have Yet To Understand The Effects Of Excessive Texting Impacting Our Communications And Realtionships by Idris Mootee

San Francisco weather is perfect this week, yes unusual for late Sept. Exhausted but a lot of things get done. Will be spending a lot of time here.

 

Reducing Workplace Toxins with Novelty that Transforms by Ellen Weber

We now know the brain lights to novelty in refreshing ways – not a bad recipe for cutting edge advances at work. We also see servers and software equipped with interactive programs that  engage more talent in teams. Imagine this merger of  brain-compatible research and user-friendly technology, as the quintessential tool to rescue workplaces trapped in rigid ruts.

Spend time with people who challenge your thinking by Paul Sloane

‘You are the average of the five people that you spend the most time with,’ says author Richard Koch. While this statement is not to be taken literally or mathematically it plainly contains a disturbingly large grain of truth. For most of us the people we choose to associate with reflect ourselves, our values, our backgrounds, our attitudes and our behaviours.

Do You Have a Complexity Complex? by Holly G. Green

Are you overwhelmed by how fast the world moves these days? Does it seem like everything is getting more complicated? Do you sometimes feel like you might be out of your league when it comes to leading an organization in today’s chaotic markets?

 

Have a nice week!

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Who is an Ethnographer? by Idris Mootee

Ethnography is hot. Many are quick to claim that they do ethnography by observing people. It is like saying anyone who drives a taxi in NY is a screenwriter. Or anyone who knows how to operate a camera can be a photojournalist

Apple iPad and Google Buzz: Harsh Reality of Innovation by Hutch Carpenter

Nothing like putting your heart and soul in an innovation, and then getting this:

Innovation tip – look for remote as well as local opportunities by Paul Sloane

Most businesses look for new opportunities in obvious places, adjacent to their current position. They typically ask two questions:

Innovation Case: Creating A World Class Innovation Unit by Stefan Lindegaard

A global and well-respected company in a fast-growing industry wants to set up a new innovation unit. Their current innovation efforts are technology-driven but there is a growing understanding that innovation efforts need to focus beyond technology and R&D.

The Golden Age of Innovation – Newsweek via Ralph-Ohr

Despite stereotypes of entrepreneurs as fresh-faced youngsters, new research has found that older workers are more likely to innovate than their under-35 counterparts.

Leadership from the Inside Out — Part II by Gary Hamel

In my previous post, I introduced you to Drew Williams. For seven years Drew served as assistant vicar at St. Andrews, an Anglican parish in Chorleywood, England. When he arrived in 2003, Drew found a church that was big but not growing, and a congregation that was loyal but not energized. Mark Stibbe, head vicar at St. Andrews, challenged Drew to develop a plan that would change this.

Watch the disruptors, not the incumbents by by Tom Hulme

If you want to turn a competitor’s advantage into a weakness, start by widening your sources of inspiration

Needs-Based Innovation Reigns Businessweek via Jorge Barba

Companies should adopt an innovation process based on customer needs rather than coming up with “big” ideas and then testing them out. Pro or con?

Ten More Great Free e-Books for Innovators by Tim Kastelle

On Christmas Day last year, I posted a list of ten great free e-books for innovators. Today isn’t as festive, but I have another ten great free e-books that can help you become more innovative. Connecting ideas is the fundamental creative act in innovation, and one of the ways to do this is to read widely in order to gain exposure to a wide variety of ideas. This is a list of great resources that will help you do precisely that.

Have a nice week!

Some good things to read!

How to Build Cooperation by Greg Satell

Can’t we all just get along?

No we can’t.  Not if we think we can win by screwing over the other guy.  We are all predators by nature (some of us more than others) and we do what we must in order to survive.

True Leaders Are Also Managers by Robert I. Sutton

Ever have occasion to do an in-depth review of the academic and practical literature on leadership? I have — twice in the past five years

 

Openness or How Do You Design for the Loss of Control? By Tim Leberecht via Ralph-Ohr

Openness is the mega-trend for innovation in the 21st century, and it remains the topic du jour for businesses of all kinds. Granted, it has been on the agenda of every executive ever since Henry Chesbrough’s seminal Open Innovation came out in 2003.

Which Part of Your Business Model is Creating Value? By Tim Kastelle

Andrew Keen posted a fascinating interview with Jeff Jarvis yesterday. All of the interview clips are worth watching – they touch on a number of interesting topics, including the relative benefits of publicness and privacy, the future of news and how to best develop new business models for journalism, why google struggles with social applications, and the changing nature of internet-based business models. The latter is included in this clip:

Strategy starts with identifying changes by Jorge Barba

Pay attention to this McKinsey Quarterly interview of Richard Rumelt, professor of strategy at UCLA’s Anderson School of Management:

Smartfailing – a new concept for learning through failure by Stefan Lindegaard

We need to become better at learning through failure, but the word failure itself is so negatively loaded. How can we create a new concept and vocabulary on the intersection of failure and learning?

The efficient use of ideas by Jeffrey Phillips

Every significant “leap forward” in the span of human consciousness has coincided with a significant change in the efficient use of a significant resource.  For example – the transition from nomadic life to farming.

Ideas Jam – How it works by Paul Sloane

We ran the Ideas Jam meeting yesterday and it went well. It was an intensive idea generation session.

Creativity Matters by John Maeda

Last month when Newsweek [07.19.10] ran a piece on how to fix the “Creativity Crisis” in America, the mainstream media brought to light critical issues that are routinely ignored in the U.S. today

How to Find Opportunities in Fragmentation by Andrea Meyer

Point: If you’re looking for a new business opportunity, look for individually-fragmented but collectively large areas of economic activity, such as where individuals or small business own a large segment of the market

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Enjoy this!

 

The Future of Customer Relationship Management by  Arie Goldshlager

I expect Customer Relationship Management and Marketing to move forward on the following several trajectories:

 1) From Value Extraction to Value Exchange to Value Co-Creation

As customers become more knowledgeable, informed and connected successful companies will find Value Exchange and Value Co-Creation Strategies more and more attractive.

Innovate What You Know? By Tim Kastelle

Here’s a topic I’ve been thinking about a fair bit recently – are we more innovative when we focus on solving our own problems? As Matt put it on the 37 Signals, there’s a strong argument for designing what you know:

Design for better behavior in mind by Jorge Barba

If we want to encourage better behaviors we have to make it easier for people to do whatever it is that we want them to do by removing obstacles in their path.

Innovation is interrelated and interdependent by Jeffrey Phillips

One of the most illuminating comments I heard recently in a training program we offered was one participant’s realization that innovation, especially bringing a new idea to fruition, might require more than just product innovation.

The End of Open Innovation by Stefan Lindegaard

I had an interesting session in Sao Paulo, Brazil yesterday when a group of about 40 people listened to my talk based on my book, The Open Innovation Revolution.

3 Ways to Think Like a Designer by Open Forum

It has become apparent to me through comments, questions and work with clients that many business owners and operators believe design-based innovation, aka design thinking, is limited to products… that services and processes and web operations don’t really lend themselves to the discipline of design thinking, beyond perhaps the aesthetics of “making pretty.”

 

The Future of Tech According to Kids: Immersive, Intuitive and Surprisingly Down-to-Earth – ReadWriteWeb

If we were to ask you to name one thing you wish your computer (or another Web-enabled device) could do, but doesn’t now, what would you say? How about the ability to “touch the things that are in the screen, to feel and move them.” That’s what 7-year-old Daniela* wants. Matthew, 6, wishes he could play 3D games on his computer, and Jenna, 7, would like a solar-powered laptop. Cristina, 12, thinks it’d be great to travel more – to experience new, far-away places with the help of virtual reality

 

Assess your Innovation Capability with a Healthcheck by Paul Sloane

Just how innovative is your organisation? What is holding you back from being truly agile?

 

Five Common Innovation and Change Mistakes by Idris Mootee

Walk into a Barnes and Noble you can find dozens of books on innovation. There are books ranging from teaching the ‘how to” to teaching creative thinking. There are not many good ones simply because the subject is a moving target with rules being broken and created every day

Ideas as Killer Social Objects for Enterprise 2.0   by Hutch Carpenter

Social objects.

Familiar with that term? If you’re steeped in social media and Enterprise 2.0, you probably are. If not, here’s a good description by Sarah Perez on ReadWriteWeb:

Social objects are objects that connect people with shared interests.

 

Some of my readings:

 

Critical Lessons, Facts On Open Innovation by Stefan Lindegaard

In early May, I moderated a great panel discussion at The Front End of Innovation conference in Boston working with Chris Thoen, Managing Director of Open Innovation at P&G and Jeff Bellairs, Sr. Director Connected Innovation at General Mills.

To see the invisible make distinctions by Jorge Barba

Over the weekend  Ralph Ohr shared a blog post about 20 ways to see the invisible to which I want to add to it.

How many times a day do you notice something? 

My grandfather was a successful Mexican entrepreneur in his time, he designed bags for women and was also an interior designer. I was 7 seven years old when I started hanging out with my grandfather and one thing I remember about him is that he had deep empathy for people (my grandparents had a room in their house where they would give low-means people shelter for a few days).

E-tailing and the Net Generation by by Rowan Gibson

“Hey Dad, can I have your credit card number? I need to buy something online”. This is not just an annoying question my sixteen-year-old son seems to ask me two or three times a month. It’s a harbinger that e-tailing is set to go ballistic as soon as today’s teenagers get their first paychecks.

“I Link, Therefore I Am” by Mitch Ditkoff

Rene Descartes, the famous 17th century philosopher, mathematician, and physicist is best known for having distilled his world view down to five words: “I think, therefore I am.”

Innovation is playing offense, not defense by Jeffrey Phillips   via @ralph_ohr

Innovation is playing offense, not defense

Where would we be without a good sports analogy every so often?  I was thinking about the challenges of innovation recently and it occurred to me that corporate strategy and innovation is often about making a choice between defending turf and taking or creating turf.

Guidelines for Engaging in Generative Dialogue (a.k.a. The Conversation)  by Venessa Miemis 

This article is crossposted from Jorge Jaime’s blog, in response to my video post a few weeks back about “The Conversation.” I recorded an hour long chat on skype with Scott Lewis (@jazzmann91), broken down into 5 minute clips, in which we discussed the concept behind Junto. Namely, it is a conversation platform we are inspiring to be built around the intention of creating a respectful space where people can engage in generative dialogue and come to a place of understanding and shared meaning

 

Dozens of integrated tools help you capture what inspires you in Evernote By Chuck Frey

If you’ve read this blog for any length of time, you know that I’m a big fan of Evernote, an application that enables you to capture content from web pages, write notes, and store just about any kind of digital content you can think of. That makes it an ideal tool for me to capture all of my ideas and the things that inspire me. In short, it’s my idea management tool of choice.

Go Out and Do Great Stuff  by Tim Kastelle

I just finished an executive education course on Public Sector Innovation. It was a terrific week – doing a full course in one week is very intensive, but when you’re working with a really smart group, as we were this week, it is exhilarating.

 

The end of busy  by  Leo Babauta via Paul Sloane

Stop being busy and your job is half done.

Think about how busy we are, and how it has become a way of bragging: I’m so busy, I must be important.

 

Bruce Mau’s new book: The Third Teacher by hellodesigners

I had the opportunity to work with Bruce Mau Design at OWP/P a few years ago on a 50th Anniversary Book for the firm. Since then the two design firms completed a book, The Third Teacher. This is a strong-willed and informative book, as are all of BMD’s work. Large type, bold colors and the use of shocking statistics make this book a great addition to anyone involved in education, any parent concerned in their child’s education, and anyone questioning our country and planet’s future (hummm, that would be everyone).

Enjoy it!

Be More Innovative Today – Make Fresh Insightful Connections by Tim Kastelle

Fresh insightful connections.”

That’s how Rishad Tobaccowala defines innovation in a terrific post today called Becoming Innovative.

I think this is a great way to think about innovation. I’ve already said that connecting ideas is the fundamental creative act in innovation, so it was great to see Rishad say this:

Moleskine + Evernote: Idea capture heaven by Jorge Barba

Do you know how we get ideas when we’re not thinking about problems? I don’t know about you but I’ve never gotten good ideas in the middle of a brainstorm, I’ve gotten them after the brainstorm when I’m not even thinking about problems.

How a Botanist helped in the design of your computer and TV by Paul Sloane

Liquid crystals represent a state of matter which exists between solid and liquid states. They were first discovered in 1888 by Austrian botanist Friedrich Reinitzer who was studying cholesterol at the Charles University in Prague.

Observing – the Mother of All Discovery Skills by Yann Cramer Blogging Innovation

Observing is a critical skill for people willing to increase their innovation capability. It is critical because observing customers will reveal behavior patterns that they have unknowingly developed to compensate for some inconvenience that could be removed or for some unmet need to could be addressed more fully

How Leaders Can “Walk The Talk” for Innovation…    by Paul Williams

I list leadership engagement in the first spot on that list for a reason.  It is certainly the most important factor for innovation success within an organization.  Without true engagement by at least one executive leader (preferably all), innovation will never gain the traction it needs to be considered as a true business discipline, gain the resources it needs to succeed or develop the process depth required to make it effective, efficient and repeatable.

 

A Consultant’s Approach to Open Innovation by Stefan Lindegaard

What does a consultant focus on when having a first talk with a potential client looking for help on open innovation issues?

Let me share my thoughts on this. Perhaps other consultants – or someone from the client side – will share more insights on this.

Brand-Driven Innovation by Erik Roscam Abbing and Christa van Gessel –  via Arie Goldshlager

As the nature of innovation shifts from the application of new technology to the delivery of meaning and value, brand and design become critical resources, as well as partners, in the development of market-leading products and services. Erik Roscam Abbing and Christa van Gessel provide an overview and case studies of this process as it moves from “brand usability” to “innovation strategy” to “design strategy” to “touch-point orchestration.”

 

Simon Sinek: How great leaders inspire action – via Ralph-Christian  Ohr – Talks TED

Why a CIO Isn’t by Paula Thornton

Chief Information Officer, Chief Technology Officer: What’s the difference? Sometimes one reports to the other. How accurate is the title, Chief Information Officer? Do they champion and defend the delivery of information? Really?

FREE BOOK CHAPTER: Why Top Executives Do Not Get Innovation, Much Less Open Innovation – and What to Do About It by Stefan Lindegaard

My book, The Open Innovation Revolution: Essentials, Roadblocks, and Leadership Skills hits the bookstores late May. As an appetizer, I am happy to provide you yet another chapter for free.

Innovation Failure Points: Evaluation, Selection and Prototyping by Jeffrey Phillips

Over the last week I’ve written several posts about the “failure points” of innovation, using the premise that failure is more instructive than than success, and that there are consistent points of failure in the innovation cycle.

 

Bad Attitudes Can Lead to Good Innovation by Paul Sloane

How can you build a team that is innovative, dynamic and capable of finding breakthroughs for tough problems? How can you avoid repeating dreary routines and find sparkling new ideas instead? One way is to make sure that among your solid citizens you have a good sprinkling of rebels.

 

Think Like a Biologist to be a Better Manager by Tim Kastelle

The first Archaeopteryx fossil was found in 1861, and it now resides in the Natural History Museum in London. It was an important find – two years after the publication of The Origin of Species by Charles Darwin, Archaeopteryx was the rarest of fossils, and one that was quite useful for Darwin’s theory – an intermediate form. Archaeopteryx very clearly shows the transition from dinosaurs to birds.

And, Via Ralph-Christian Ohr (Special thanks):

 

Together We Innovate By Rob Cross, Andrew Hargadon, Salvatore Parise and Robert J. Thomas

 

WHEN it comes to innovation, the myth of the lone genius dies hard.
Most companies continue to assume that innovation comes from that individual genius, or, at best, small, sequestered teams that vanish from sight and then return with big ideas. But the truth is most innovations are created through networks — groups of people working in concert.

The Best of Inspiring ideas – HSM

…Organizational DNA for strategic Innovation…

And read…more…

Have a nice week!

Those are special to me! And to you? Take a look!

The Rising Underemployment Rate and its Emotional Impact by Steve Nguyen

In a previous post called The Cost of Unemployment, I wrote about the toll, on health and well-being, that unemployment had on people.

One aspect of unemployment that rarely gets mentioned is underemployment. Gallup defines underemployment as people who are “unemployed or working part-time but wanting full-time work” (Jacobe, 2010, para. 3). According to the latest Gallup poll, the underemployment rate is at a staggering 20% as of March 15, 2010, compared to the 9.7% unemployment rate reported by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

#Innovation = changing things by Jorge Barba

When I was younger and went with my parents to all family get togethers all the grown ups would sit at a table and talk/rant about politics (you get the picture!). My mom would ask me why I didn’t go and sit with my dad so that I could learn something, to which my response was:

Open Innovation Perspectives for Executives, Innovation Leaders and Employees by Stefan Lindegaard

As I prepare for a couple of workshops in the coming weeks, I have the opportunity to think about how to prepare different messages for three different groups of stakeholders within a company; executives, innovation leaders and other employees working with innovation.

 

Preparing for the Unknown by Andrea Meyer

Story: What will the web look like in 20 years? Stuart Miniman of the Office of the CTO at EMC Corporation asked me to contribute my thoughts on this, as part of EMC’s ON magazine celebration of the web’s 20th anniversary.

 

The Art of Good Decision Making by Mitch Ditkoff

What follows is the second in a series of postings by leadership maven, Barry Gruenberg, the newest member of the Idea Champions team.

 

The Law of Attraction is a Dangerous Delusion by Paul Sloane

One of the biggest bandwagons that has rolled through the self-help community in recent years is the so-called Law of Attraction (LoA). This claims that you attract into your life whatever you think about.  Before I explain why I believe that this is not a law, not true, and not helpful, let me differentiate the LoA from some associated but different self-help concepts that actually do work.

How You Define a Problem Determines if You Can Solve It by Tim Kastelle

How we define things is incredibly important. I’ve been reminded of this almost constantly this week. Here are some examples:

  • I was talking with a friend of mine over the weekend about using social media to improve the flow of ideas within an organisation. She is a high-ranking manager in a very large organisation, and she was curious to hear about this blog, and about how John and I have used it as a communication tool

 

Design Thinking: Everywhere and Nowhere,… by Kevin McCullagh

It’s a sign of the times when The Economist, the house journal of the global business elite, holds a conference in London on ‘design thinking’ (official Big Rethink site here). Having attended the conference, produced in association with The Design Council and held over 11-12 March, I was left wondering one thing: why is design thinking such a hot topic with business leaders, given that it leaves so many designers cold?

Thinking About Open Design  By Roland Harwood and David Simoes-Brown

“Open-source software is one thing, but would you fly in an open-source aircraft?”

This question was posed late last year at a gathering of senior design professionals in London. It was couched as a counterargument to the rise of open design and such companies as 99 designs and Quirky that offer low-cost, crowd-sourced design.

Good readings! Have a nice weekend!