Currently viewing the tag: "Liz Alt Kislik"

 

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The Problem With Communications Planning by Greg Satell

What is communications planning? I don’t mean to be cheeky, but I would assume that it should have something to do with communicating.

 

How ‘Sticky’ is Design Thinking? By will novosedlik via @ralph_ohr

On its way to meme-hood, even before it has had a chance to gain purchase in the minds of the people who need it most, the term ‘design thinking’ is showing signs of mutational stress that threaten a common understanding of its value and validity.

 

Employees don’t always share well with others, says new paper exposing “knowledge hiding.” By Rotman via @ariegoldshlager

Why isn’t knowledge transfer happening more often in companies spending money on it?

Maybe it’s because their staff don’t always want to share.

 

The Problem with Fitting New Ideas Into Old Business Models by Tim Kastelle

Malcolm Gladwell retells the story of the Xerox Palo Alto Research Center in the latest issue of the New Yorker (it’s readable behind a paywall here). The story of PARC is fascinating, and Gladwell provides a nice twist to it. One of the main threads in the story concerns their invention of the laser printer.

 

The Beginning of a New Discipline by Idris Mootee

Prague is mystical with a mix of medieval, Renaissance, and Art Nouveau architecture and the design scene is slowly taking shape. You still see traces of history of what communism had done to the city even after these buildings are completely restored. It is where Renaissance meets neo-Gothic and the baroque structures from the 18th centuries

 

Creating Infectious Action – Innovation Uncensored by Jennifer Aaker

“Slideshare”

 

The Different Taxonomies of Open Innovation by OIC editor

Professor Henry Chesbrough speaks with Gary Hamel, Visiting Professor of Strategic and International Management at the London Business School and Director of the Management Lab.

 

Can You Be Happy at Work? Should You Be? By Liz Alt Kislik

Consider these scenarios, each from a different organization, and the unfortunate, but logical, conclusions that can be drawn from each one:

 

Have a nice week!