Currently viewing the tag: "Jorge Barba"

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Improving Your Idea Generating Skills… by  Paul Williams

A hunch is your creativity trying to tell you something” – Unknown

So where do you find yourself and what are you doing when you get a great idea…or any idea?

I’ll bet that you said something close to one of these:

Cultivating Innovation When The Future Is Unknowable by Joe Brewer via Ralph-Ohr

Sometimes what we think we know is more consequential than what we actually know.  As we nestled into our beds on the night of September 10th, 2001 most of us did not know that we would awaken to a terrorist attack that would unleash a decade of global unrest.

Before You Decide Vision Is Passé: 8 Reasons Why Vision Matters by Jesse Lyn Stoner

Have you ever been part of a team that magically came together? -where everyone thoroughly enjoyed being part of the team, worked together in synchronicity, and where you were really proud of what you accomplished?

The Rise of Shared Value by Arie Goldshlager

The JWT’s trendspotters recently included The Rise of Shared Value in their Top Ten trends for 2012:

Large Organizations and the Business Model Canvas by Paul Hobcraft

Recently I was having a ‘conversation’ with Alexander Osterwalder concerning the limited adoption of the Business Model Canvas within large organizations. I was asking him if he agreed and if he had any thoughts on this.

                                                                                                                                                 How permission to innovate leads to accidental innovation by Jorge Barba

Two weeks ago I wrote about the four signs that show that you have a culture of innovation. Well here’s another one:

A good sign that you’re innovating is when employees don’t ask for permission to do so. They just do it.

Use Your Value Proposition to Avoid Fatal Business Models by Tim Kastelle

What do you think of when you think of Swiss Watches?

You probably think of high-end brands, that have been making well-crafted watches for many years. Brands like Rolex, or Patek Philippe, or George Clooney and his Omega:

2012 – The Year of the Interface by Greg Satell

Besides his impressive array of trysts, Captain Kirk had very little on today’s average Joe. Personal communicators are now old hat, tricorders are right around the corner and even teleportation no longer seems completely out of reach.

Reinventing Collaboratively by Deborah Mills-Scofield

After co-creating on Business Model Generation with author Alex Osterwalder, I received an invitation from Steve Denning to review a book he was writing on transforming management (The Leader’s Guide to Radical Management).

Are You Standing Out Today? By Nilofer Merchant

People buy two categories of things.

The distinct. And the generic.

The distinct items are the things that have a limited commodity, that are artisan in nature, that are worth paying a premium for. They stand out for some reason. The generic items are, well, the things you find on Amazon.

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Status Quophiles and Quophobes by Deborah Mills Scofield

Ever know anyone who will explicitly say he/she doesn’t think innovation is important? No! So listen carefully for the magic word – “but”.   Some of you know how much I love to challenge the status quo so here’s my theory: Status Quophiles see the glass as half empty and want to make sure it doesn’t become totally empty.  Status Quophobes are Innovators – they see the half empty glass as half full, waiting to be filled up!

Life’s What You Make It by Tim Kastelle

Well, we’re all getting older. What do you make of it? I ran across an interesting post by Ben Casnocha, which referenced an article by Benjamin Schwarz which includes this comment on John Updike:

The Pitfalls of Prediction by Greg Satell

Prognostication is a multi-billion dollar industry.  We have weathermen, Wall Street Analysts, political pundits and futurologists.  They all claim some expertise.

 

Hang Your Work in a Tree Tonight by Jesse Lyn Stoner

If you do what you love for a living, you’ll never work a day in your life. ~anonymous

An appealing thought, if it means living an integrated life.
However…there’s a big difference between living an integrated life and being consumed by work.

Creativity And Innovation In Small And Medium Size Firms by Idris Mootee

I am in Egypt this week and trying to finish three big Power Point decks, writing 6 documents and finished reading 63 documents with a slow Internet connection. And trying to finalize the editorial content for March 2012 issue of my magazine. It is not easy.

Collaboration Revs Results by Robyn McMaster

Bantering ideas back and forth triggered new insights for me and four other leaders around around the table.  Innovative possibilities spoken helped us see past familiar approaches to consider the experimental.  At times ideas were spoken so quickly it was hard to keep up!

Change will happen whether you like it or not by Jorge Barba

Companies are still scrambling with the rise of social networks like Twitter. If people think you suck they’ll gladly express themselves and let everyone else who listens to them. Oh and by the way, this happens in real-time.

8 Dangers of Collaboration by Nilofer Merchant

Most of what is written about collaboration is positive. Even hip. Collaboration is championed enthusiastically by the Enterprise 2.0 experts, as well as leading thinkers like Don Tapscott as the crucial approach for the 21st century.

Do Nice Guys Finish Last?  By Jonah Lehrer via Ralph-Ohr

In 1948, the legendary baseball manager Leo Durocher declared that “nice guys finish last.” Although Durocher would later deny the quote, his pithy line summarizes a popular and pessimistic take on human nature. When it comes to success, we assume that making it to the top requires ethical compromises.

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How To Find Your Passion by Bruce Upbin via Ralph-Ohr

What causes stress, both the personal kind (money woes, boss-hate, road-rage) and the societal kind (#OWS, congressional gridlock, volatile stock markets)? John Hagel has a theory about stress–and a solution.

11 Uncomfortable Facts About How IQ Affects Your Life by Kim Bhasin


We’d like to think that IQ isn’t the determining factor for success in life.

But psychology professors David Hambrick and Elizabeth Meinz recently wrote an Op-Ed for The New York Times, “Sorry Strivers, Talent Matters,” where they cite a few scientific studies that point to innate talent — not practice — as what separates the good from the great.

Complexity and User Experience by Jon Bolt

The best products don’t focus on features, they focus on clarity. Problems should be fixed through simple solutions, something you don’t have to configure, maintain, control. The perfect solution needs to be so simple and transparent you forget it’s even there.

 

People don’t buy what you do, people buy why you do it by Jorge Barba

Yesterday I went to TEDex TijuanaSalon at Cety’s University in Tijuana. While three of the four speakers talked about entrepreneurship, it was the speaker in a video from a previous TED that got the most applause. The people who organized the event apparently wanted to add more content and so decided to play Simon Sinek’s video for the audience.

The Truth About Strategy by Greg Satell

Over the years I’ve done a lot of things.  I’ve lived in a bunch of countries, run a number of businesses and even spent some years as an independent strategic consultant. Clients would come to me to solve their problems and, inevitably, they always traced them back to strategy.

The Unboxed Life: Giving by Jon Mertz

One side of our life needs to be boxed in, and another needs to be unboxed. Our unboxed life needs to be spirit-led, soul-inspired.

We hear words like “listen to your spirit” or “reach into your soul” and, at times, it just seems like a lot of nonsense. Yet, we know it when we feel it, and we know it when we hear it. Both come from within, soulful and spirited-minded.

 

The Innovating Power of Eight Words by Paul Hobcraft

Lately eight words have come up more often than not as the new imperative for business, not just for the start up but the more established business to measure themselves against. We live in ‘volatile’ times and they reflect what we have to constantly remind ourselves to do and they just are keeping me buzzing at present.

Have a nice week! 

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Sorry, Marketing’s 4P framework is not dead.. by Wim Rampen

Why Do B-Schools Still Teach The Famed 4P’s Of Marketing, When Three Are Dead?That was the question raised by Jens Martin Skibsted and Rasmus Bech Hansen and it received some good traction. Skibsted and Hansen argue that the only P of the four alive is Product.

4 Roles for Your Innovation Team by Tim Kastelle

Here’s a persistent innovation management question: is it better to have a dedicated team responsible for innovation, or should this responsibility be distributed throughout your entire organisation? The best answer depends on your circumstances. But if you set up a dedicated team, it’s important to consider what role you want them to play. There are four different roles that a dedicated innovation team can fill.

Reward insight or reward ideas? Both and… by Jorge Barba

This is a tricky question.

First of all, insights are different from ideas. Insights are more important than ideas. Breakthrough businesses are build on insights, not ideas. Ideas come after the insight. Yet in innovation circles we constantly hear that we should reward people for coming up with ideas. What about rewarding people for insights?

The Ultimate Code by Greg Satell

Digeratti are an unusual bunch.  Branded with distinctive facial hair configurations and fueled by caffeine, they run around coding, pitching, inventing and envisioning a bold new future.

GEN Z IN THE WORKPLACE – THOUGHTS AFTER #TCHAT by Pam Ross

There was a great discussion, and at times, debate, on #TChat last week, all about Generation Z and the workplace.  It feels like we just learned about Gen Y and how to engage them in the workplace, and it’s already time to prepare for Gen Z!

What Do Workplace Pit Bulls Do to Accountability? By Kate Nasser

Leaders, do you appoint someone the workplace pit bull believing it will make everyone more responsible and accountable? Let’s considerwhat workplace pit bulls do to accountability.

Two Collaborative Care Case Studies by Arie Goldshlager

The Collaborative Chronic Care Network (C3N) is certainly a very inspiring case of Collaborative Care Networks:

“Americans receive only 50% of recommended care and typically perform only about half of the “self-management” procedures and behaviors necessary to keep them healthy.

Explained: Why We Don’t Like Change by Heidi Grant Halvorson via Ralp-Ohr

Thinking about trying to shake things up at work? Brimming with new ideas and strategies? Hoping to get your organization to try a new way of doing things, or maybe just get your family to alter their holiday traditions a bit? Good for you.

Have a nice week!

 

 

 

 

 

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What is Intelligence? By Greg Sattel

We know intelligence when we see it.  Witty repartee at a cocktail party. Outstanding results on standardized tests.  Winning the big prize on a quiz show.

 

Why Most Meetings Suck by Ellen Weber

When Tom Hansen said most meetings suck, he hit on a rampant waste of human talent today.

That problem begs the question: How do you engage talents, considering that:

 

Innovation When All You Have is a Noodle by Tim Kastelle

Most of the inspirational innovation stories that we hear are about technology firms like Google, Amazon and Apple. This sometimes makes it difficult to help people find the connections to their work if they are in less sexy industries, like mining, education or government.

 

Diagnose and Cure Team Drift by  Jesse Lyn Stoner

One of the most common complaints I hear from managers is, “I want to re-energize our team. We used to be cohesive and enjoy working together.

 

The Science of Irrationality by Jonah Lehrer via Ralph Ohr

Here’s a simple arithmetic question: “A bat and ball cost $1.10. The bat costs $1 more than the ball. How much does the ball cost?”

                                                                                                                                                     Innovation’s Natural Force by Deborah Mills-Scofield

A few weeks ago, I was driving by an abandoned Ford plant in Lorain, OH.   The plant, a key regional employer closed in 2005.  What struck me were the parking lots.  Some of them had become fields!

                                                                                                                                                     

Is innovation really going to save the economy? By Jorge Barba

First of all, I’m not even sure what we want out of innovation. If we take what we see out there as a signal, then we sure aren’t innovating anything.

 

Creativity in Business: My Interview with Bill Smith, PhD by Michelle James

Interview # 31 in our Creativity in Business Thought Leader Series is with 
Bill Smith, PhD, President of  ODII. Bill is an innovative thinker and practitioner in the field of leadership, organization and social development.

 

Service Design: The Most Important Term You Haven’t Heard Of by Darren Weiss

James Rock, the managing director and chief business designer for Cultivar Consulting Limited, a business and services design consultancy, talks about service design, its benefits and why it’s important for your business.

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The Crisis of Meaning in the Millennial Workforce by Megan Erickson

What’s the Big Idea?

For all the talk of trailblazing, the most successful businesses of the 20th century made it to the top by maintaining an edge in the same singular pursuit: maximizing shareholder value.

The Marvels and the Flaws of Intuitive Thinking by Daniel Kahneman via Ralph Ohr

“The power of settings, the power of priming, and the power of unconscious thinking, all of those are a major change in psychology. I can’t think of a bigger change in my lifetime. You were asking what’s exciting? That’s exciting, to me.”

Can mastery and innovation coexist? By Jorge Barba

Jonathan Fields posted this question in a Psychology Today article last week. Here is my answer and would love to hear yours.

It’s a great question and not at all difficult to answer, though it’s better said than done. First of all, mastery is never achieved. It’s a goal, but a goal we’ll never reach.

The Finnish Awesomeness and Entrepreneurship by Riitta Raesmaa

Something exceptional is happening here in Finland. However I think that the foundation for that has existed a long time, only to wait its time to come. And it seems that the time is here and now. Let me explain.

 

IDEO: Big Innovation Lives Right on the Edge of Ridiculous Ideas by Jake Cook

Imagine for a second if you could somehow wrap up the creative chaos of a kindergartner’s life and apply it at work. You’d go on field trips, make stuff, hatch crazy ideas, and be awed by the world on a daily basis. Sound ridiculous? At the renowned international design consultancy IDEO, it’s how work gets done every day.

 

Co-Creating Business Models by Deborah Mills-Scofield

In 2009,  I was privileged to co-create an awesome book, Business Model Generation, with Alex Osterwalder and Yves Pigneur.     Co-creating the book with Alex was an amazing experience, created some lasting friendships with other co-creators, and of course Alex.  After Angela Dunn‘s monthly twitter-chat, #ideachat, I decided to ask Alex what made him decide to do co-create this book:

The 10 Most Important Trends in Business by Haydn Shaughnessy

What is the single most important trend in business today? If there was a beauty contest or an arm wrestle to decide, then the big surprise would be the sheer number of contestants.

5 Things You Need To Know About (Social) CRM (Definitions) by Wim Rampen

I think trying to define something is a very good exercise to understand what you are dealing with or what you are trying to do it for. It also helps to communicate internally. And regardless of what many say, I don’t think there are enough definitions of (Social) CRM, at least not good ones.. But that is a personal opinion, not relevant to today’s post.

Building a Better Business by Design by RAYLENE KNUTSON

Are you a business that wants to innovate? Think like a designer. That’s the message from a growing number of consultants, business leaders, policy makers and educators who think companies need to swap obsessive analytics for more right-brain experimentation.

When Working Memory Kicks In by Ellen Weber

Unless looking for lost golf balls, that hold up games –  stay with a thing until you find it. The brain’s working memory kicks in to land life-changing dreams, when you GO FOR IT. On the flip side of waiting for windfalls – winners run with What if … possibilities – and working memory lands new deals.

Have a nice week!

 

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Creative thinking is not a one time activity by Jorge Barba

Late last year, in response to an article that stated that you need to stifle your creativity in order to get promoted, I argued that you needed to become a credible innovator to cut through the smoke and keep those objections at bay.

 

Pave the way for impact by striking a balance between the small and the big Jenny Comiskey via Ralph Ohr

Attempting to solve large-scale social challenges can be an overwhelming task. They are the domain of messy, interdependent, complicated issues, outdated models, and often mired in the status quo. It’s not unusual to face a paralysis in action or become stuck in endless debate when attempting change within this environment.

 

Iteration, Collaboration, and Innovation by Deborah Mills-Scofield

 “Even a brown box can be innovative when you think about supply chain, how you bring it to market,” Waite says. But that can only happen if you provide an atmosphere where your employees’ innovation can thrive.

 

Mind the Gap by Tim  Kastelle

I did a workshop last week with a group working on improving innovation within the Australian school system. I played my normal role of grenade-thrower, errr, thought-provoker on the topic of innovation, while working with eight other people that all have backgrounds in education.

 

Five Easy Ways To Tell If An Organization Is Really Values-Driven by Jesse Lyn Stoner

What do Zappos, Ben and Jerry’s, and Southwest Airlines have in common? They are all financially successful, values-driven companies.

 

How to Fix the System by Greg Satell

Pissed off at the system?  Most people are, as they should be. Systems suck.  Anybody who says he likes the system is either a liar, a fool or the guy who created it in the first place.

 

How NOT to Disrupt Yourself or The Pioneer-Maintainer’s Dilemna by Marion Chapsal

After read­ing @JohnsonWhitney’s excel­lent post on Har­vard Busi­ness Review, “Dis­rupt Your­self”, which encour­ages pio­neer and innovator’s val­ues, one of the com­ments caught my attention.

 

Towards Implementing Effective Employee-Driven Innovation Systems by Arie Goldshlager

This article outlines several of my key findings from a recent implementation of an Employee-Driven Innovation system.  The system facilitated generation, evaluation, development, promotion, and selection of employees’ ideas:

 

Ray Anderson: how to show the art of the possible by Mallen Baker

Ray Anderson has sadly lost his fight against cancer.
It’s worth reflecting on the example he gave, because it isn’t just that he was an inspirational figure who argued for a sustainable business model.

Have a great week!

 

 

 

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Why Diversity is Good for Business by Jeanette Mulvey via Ralph-Ohr

There’s lots of talk about innovation being the key to growing American businesses, but exactly how companies get innovative remains less clearly defined. One way to drive innovation, according to a new Forbes study, is to hire a more diverse work force.

 

Getting Open Innovation Participation by Andrea Meyer

Point: Crowdsourcing and open innovation efforts rely on participation.  Attracting participants and encouraging activity is a key success factor in obtaining and vetting new product, service and process innovation ideas.

 
‘Better’ is the more practical approach to innovation in general by Jorge Barba

It all starts with the question: How can I make this better?

Framing is important and when talking about innovation that usually means deciding between incremental and radical change. Yet for most businesses, they don’t want to hear about change. They want the world they exist in just the way it is, especially if they’ve had some level of success.

 

Set Up Your Team for Success by Jesse Lyn Stoner 

Do you have a new team or are you starting a new project? Most teams rush into the work of the team without getting clear agreements in the beginning about where they are going or how they want to get there.

 

And the All Time Winner is… by Wim Rampen

We’ve already past the first 6 months of this year. A good time to take a look at what you have been reading around here. I’ve put together two lists: one Top 5 of all time best viewed posts and one Top 5 of the best viewed posts over the first six months of this year.

 

Incumbentitis – The Anti-Innovation Disease by Deb Mills-Scofield

Well, will congress put the country or their own political careers first?  You’d think they should be one and the same but we know they aren’t. With the upcoming elections, getting re-elected will matter more.  In 2010, it was out with the ‘old’, in with the new, mostly.  Washington DCers (and Wall Street) want desperately to maintain the status quo, yet America is asking for government by the people, of the people and for the people (sound familiar?). Can the US Government re-invent itself? Well, can big established companies even do it?

 

Transformation further Distilled by Sinan Si Alhir

Thriving and high performing organizations are founded on strong cultures, which involve shared values, strategy alignment, and interconnection. Such organizations achieve 4 times higher revenue, 7 times more expanded work force, 12 times higher stock prices, and 756% higher net income. However, approximately 70% of all change initiatives focused on improving performance fail!

 

The Mona Lisa Code by Greg Satell

Everybody knows the Mona Lisa.  She’s iconic; as much of a symbol of art as art itself. Housed in Paris but reproduced everywhere, there is probably nothing else on earth that so thoroughly fuses the ridiculous and the sublime as the Mona Lisa.

 

The New Game Of Strategy: Applied Design Thinking In Business Innovation And Transformation by Idris Mootee

Just when I thought I can have 2 days in an office then I realized I have to be In NYC tomorrow for a few days. I am writing this post on a flight after missing my connection in Houston, and just finished teaching a three days Strategy graduate course with a focus on strategic innovation and design thinking.

Have a nice week 

 

 

Enjoy it

 

Diversity, complexity, chaos and working smarter by Harold Jarche via Ralp-Ohr

Here are some of the things I learned via Twitter this past week.

What Diversity Really Means by Alicia Arenas

There was a pretty fantastic Twitter conversation happening last week on #TChat; it was about diversity. Be sure to check out the preview on MonsterThinking and the #TChat recap.

 

SOMETHING NEW: MEASURING TEAM IQ by Karsten Jonsen via Arie Goldshlager

Teams have intelligence just like individual people do. But the intelligence factor of human groups is not simply the average of its members, in fact that has only little to do with it.

This Space Intentionally Left White by Sabina Nawaz

Looking for an edge over your competition? Searching for an untapped market? Try slowing down to see more, two hours at a time.

 

 

Value Co-Creation Canvas by Wim Rampen

Presentation

6 Ways to Spot Liars and Fools by Greg Sattel

Some people are dishonest, some are just plain stupid and lots write articles and provide commentary.  Inevitably there’s going to be some intersection between the three sets.

Random Thoughts On Muggles, Magic And Design Thinking by Idris Mootee

For those of you who are not familiar with Muggles, they are people who are incapable of magic, and who are usually unaware of the wizarding world. Design Thinking is sort of like wizardries, it takes certain type of people with the certain type of training, Hogwarts or Harvard.

Laughter sets your mind free by Jorge Barba

A few days ago I was part of a brainstorming session for a client who recently opened a new restaurant in Mexico. The goal of the brainstorming session was to come up with ideas on how to create an experience that would make customers talk about it to their friends.

Picking the Big Idea by Nilofer Merchant

Most of us make things happen, get results, and deliver. But ask us if we’re focused on building our vision, on our big goals or if we even know what our big goal is, and what will likely follow is some combination of this: a big pause, or a look down at the carpeted floor, or talk of corporate handcuffs, or a nervous laugh, or a sudden change of subject.

Have a nice week

Enjoy it!

 

The Innovation Matrix Reloaded by Tim Kastelle

This is a bit of a distillation of observations over time.  I thought of it because I think that a lot of people that are trying to improve innovation within an organisation think that they can go from the bottom left (No Innovation Capability) to the top right (World Class Innovator) in one jump, simply by introducing some sort of innovation program. 

 

Would You Skydive Without a Parachute? How to Delegate With Confidence. By Jesse Lyn Stoner

Roger had been working way too much and knew he needed to reprioritize and delegate. But he was nervous about letting go of control and was having difficulty identifying what he could delegate.

 

Value Networks and our Sense of the Beautiful by Verna Allee

In a wonderful Ted Talk Denis Dutton traces our sense of the beautiful back to the earliest prehistoric artifacts of hand axes. Hand shell necklaces, body paint, and hand-crafted objects preceded even language. Dutton reminds us that beauty is not in the eye of the beholder, it is deep within us as an innate gift. Our powerful reaction to images, to emotion in art, to the night sky will be with us as long as the human race exists.

 

The Simple Dilemma by Greg Satell

“Keep it simple, stupid” is often repeated and invariably good advice. Nevertheless, it’s easier said than done.  The truth is that simplicity is anything but simple

 

Claiming Our Circle of Selves. The Shadows… by Marion Chapsal

Are you ready to embark on your heroine’s journey?
Before we embark together, let me give you a gentle reminder. One of the myths around coaching and personal development, is that it will enable you to discover your “true self”, your “authentic voice” and clearly reveal “your unique path”.

 

GenY: The Challenge of “Doing It All” and Technology Overload by Katrina Kibben

This is not your father’s workplace anymore – literally. This year, the oldest Baby Boomers are turning 65 years old, including President Bill Clinton.   This means that the 79 million baby boomers, about 26 percent of this country’s population will be retiring in the next few years.

 

People Skills Mistakes Won’t Define You If … by Kate Nasser

Interacting with others can be carefree or treacherous depending on the situation. Using your best people-skills steers you through the tough moments. But what if you make a mistake?

 

Lessons from a crowdsourcing experiment by Jorge Barba

One of the great things about social media is that it gives organizations the capability (if they choose to) and advantage of co-creating new products and services with their customers.

 

Father as leader by John Maeda

I have regular open office hours for students, staff, and faculty — a practice that is often suggested for college presidents and for other leaders — the so-called “open door” philosophy. You learn all kinds of things about your organization when you do so.

 

Have a nice week!