Currently viewing the tag: "John Maeda"

Enjoy it!

 

THE DARK SIDE OF BEST PRACTICES by Michael Wade via @ariegoldshlager

How can you possibly argue with best practices? These practices are, more often than not, superior to your own. Indeed, best practices embody how the best firms within an industry conduct business. By adopting them, you can share in that success. So, if they are better than what you currently have, and they are proven to be effective in your industry, then why not make the switch?

 

The Power of Synthesis and the Problem with Experts by Greg Sattel

How much do we need specialized experts for the information economy?

If history is any guide, probably not much.  It makes little sense for capable people to spend an entire career doing the same job when they would probably be much more effective if they gained experience in more than one area.

 

Are you Benevolent Dictator or BrainPowered Facilitator? By Ellen Weber

10 Key differences between…Leader traits.

 

The Rotman Design Challenge: A Review by Helen Walters

In recent years, calls for a more creative or innovative approach to, well, pretty much everything but our financial instruments, have become more pointed. As the western economy in particular has evolved away from its industrial roots and as the Internet has wrought digital havoc on the old, understood ways of doing things, so have many accepted that the education of those who will effectively lead progress toward a healthy, sustainable future must also shift — and fast.

 

Insultants not Consultants: Balancing Mastery and Questioning by Jorge Barba

Though people/clients see me as a Consultant, I’ve never really liked the label of Consultant and don’t really consider myself one because I don’t specialize. I’m more of an ‘Insultant in Residence’, not a Consultant.

 

Get in touch with your Inner Jester to have a more joyful life by Teresa Van Lanen

Here I am just recently flying a kite on the beach and laughing. Having fun and laughing on vacation is not too hard to do for most of us. But at times finding our inner jester can be difficult. With April fools day upon us I felt this topic would make a great article, enjoy!

 

Four Roadblocks for a Corporate Network Culture by Stefan Lindegaard

In working with companies that are trying to build a networking culture, here are some reasons I’ve identified for why such efforts can fail or not reach the hoped-for degree of success.

 

The art of innovation by Kate Oakley, Brooke Sperry and Andy Pratt via @ralph_ohr

In the 21st century, the UK’s economic competitiveness and social wellbeing will increasingly depend on our ability to innovate. A significant part of the innovation process revolves around ‘creativity’ – the ability to generate new ideas, or to restructure and redeploy old ones.

 

When Customer Rebellion Becomes Open Revolution by Umair Haque

What if your business isn’t just fundamentally ill-equipped to survive and thrive in the 21st century — but is actually unequipped for it?

 

Art and design in service of our world by John Maeda

I’m on a video call with the World Economic Forum Global Agenda Councils that links together experts across the world in response to global challenges. The topic of our call is centering around the situation in Japan. Prof. Toshiko Mori of Harvard shared how there is a gallery in Tokyo that is informing citizens, using art and design, as to how one-third of the electricity in Tokyo utilizes the failed nuclear powered plants — and the importance of saving energy right now in Tokyo.

I hope you enjoyed this! Have a nice week!

(Texto em Português depois deste)

 

Curiously simple

My curiosity always questions why a movement is there, or what emotions are linked to that movement at certain points within the music. It’s important to know and think what you are dancing about as you don’t want to disrespect the choreography, the choreographer nor perform the dance with the wrong emotions. It all comes back to the joys of learning and developing your skills on how to execute movements.”

We feel curiosity when we feel a gap between what we know and what we do not know, so it all comes back to learning.

Curiosity can be defined as a need or desire for knowledge that is essential for motivation.

Curiosity is our main ally in understanding the complexity that involves many challenges we face today.

Almost everything seems complex and yet many of us are looking for is simplicity.

Recent studies Say That most leaders and managers (CEOs) Identified complexity to the challenge. They want the creative leadership, to reinvent relationships with customers and Adopt a customer-centric approach.

It “seems in fact a complex world When dealing with relationships with people in an environment in constant development, But there are tools to decode this complexity and present it the simplicity.

For example, stories are an important component of direct sales. The stories always Have Been a fundamental part of any business model works, Although with different strategies.

Different Strategies in the narrative Have a very strong role in knowledge transfer. If we’re in the situation face to face, There Is Almost Always room for a very sentimental approach Can Effectively grab the attention of recipients. This personalization Contribute to identification with the content and the information to Be transferred.

The goal of any story is to create enough curiosity to take a step forward. Curiosity Plays a critical role in the brain’s innate Ability to Bridge the Gap Between what we know and not know of.

We tell stories because we want to Achieve These stories and what results we want to Achieve is the comprehension of complex things.

And I think the best way to tell the story of how simplicity can live with   complexity is seeing here  The laws of simplicity  – John Maeda

Do you want to comment?

 

Três espaços – Complexidade, Curiosidade e Storytelling

A minha curiosidade pergunta sempre, por que é que um movimento está lá, ou porque as emoções estão ligadas a esse movimento, em determinados pontos, dentro da música. É importante saber e pensar o que se está a dançar, sobre como não se queria desrespeitar a coreografia, o coreógrafo, nem executar a dança com as emoções erradas. Tudo volta para as alegrias de aprender e desenvolver as competências para executar os movimentos.”

Nós sentimos a curiosidade quando sentimos uma lacuna entre o que sabemos e o que não sabemos, por isso tudo volta à aprendizagem.

A curiosidade pode ser definida como uma necessidade, ou desejo de conhecimento que é fundamental para a motivação.

A curiosidade é o nosso principal aliado para compreender a complexidade que envolve muitos desafios com que nos deparamos hoje.

Quase tudo parece complexo e contudo o que muitos de nós procuramos é a simplicidade.

Estudos recentes dizem que grande parte dos líderes e gestores (CEOs) identificaram a complexidade como um desafio. Eles querem uma liderança criativa, reinventar relações com os clientes e adoptar uma abordagem centrada no cliente.

Parece um mundo de facto complexo quando se abordam as relações com pessoas num ambiente em constante desenvolvimento, mas há instrumentos capazes de descodificar essa complexidade e apresentá-la como simplicidade.

Por exemplo, as histórias são um componente importante da nas vendas directas. As histórias sempre foram uma parte fundamental em qualquer modelo de negócio funciona, embora com estratégias diferentes.

As diferentes estratégias na narrativa têm um papel muito forte na transferência de conhecimentos. Se estivermos numa situação cara-a-cara, há, quase sempre, lugar a uma abordagem sentimental pode muito efectivamente capturar a atenção dos destinatários. Esta personalização contribui para uma identificação com o conteúdo e com a informação a transferir.

O objectivo de qualquer história é criar curiosidade suficiente para dar um passo em frente. Curiosidade desempenha um papel crítico na capacidade inata do cérebro de preencher a lacuna entre o que sabemos e o que não sabemos.

Contamos histórias porque queremos que essas histórias atinjam resultados.

E eu penso que a melhor maneira de contar a história de como a simplicidade convive com a complexidade é seguindo as leis da simplicidade de John Maeda

 
 

 

Some good things to read!

How to Build Cooperation by Greg Satell

Can’t we all just get along?

No we can’t.  Not if we think we can win by screwing over the other guy.  We are all predators by nature (some of us more than others) and we do what we must in order to survive.

True Leaders Are Also Managers by Robert I. Sutton

Ever have occasion to do an in-depth review of the academic and practical literature on leadership? I have — twice in the past five years

 

Openness or How Do You Design for the Loss of Control? By Tim Leberecht via Ralph-Ohr

Openness is the mega-trend for innovation in the 21st century, and it remains the topic du jour for businesses of all kinds. Granted, it has been on the agenda of every executive ever since Henry Chesbrough’s seminal Open Innovation came out in 2003.

Which Part of Your Business Model is Creating Value? By Tim Kastelle

Andrew Keen posted a fascinating interview with Jeff Jarvis yesterday. All of the interview clips are worth watching – they touch on a number of interesting topics, including the relative benefits of publicness and privacy, the future of news and how to best develop new business models for journalism, why google struggles with social applications, and the changing nature of internet-based business models. The latter is included in this clip:

Strategy starts with identifying changes by Jorge Barba

Pay attention to this McKinsey Quarterly interview of Richard Rumelt, professor of strategy at UCLA’s Anderson School of Management:

Smartfailing – a new concept for learning through failure by Stefan Lindegaard

We need to become better at learning through failure, but the word failure itself is so negatively loaded. How can we create a new concept and vocabulary on the intersection of failure and learning?

The efficient use of ideas by Jeffrey Phillips

Every significant “leap forward” in the span of human consciousness has coincided with a significant change in the efficient use of a significant resource.  For example – the transition from nomadic life to farming.

Ideas Jam – How it works by Paul Sloane

We ran the Ideas Jam meeting yesterday and it went well. It was an intensive idea generation session.

Creativity Matters by John Maeda

Last month when Newsweek [07.19.10] ran a piece on how to fix the “Creativity Crisis” in America, the mainstream media brought to light critical issues that are routinely ignored in the U.S. today

How to Find Opportunities in Fragmentation by Andrea Meyer

Point: If you’re looking for a new business opportunity, look for individually-fragmented but collectively large areas of economic activity, such as where individuals or small business own a large segment of the market

Enjoy it!

I enjoy it!

 

The Chain of Experience: Jobs and Innovation by Stefan Lindegaard

I really like this sentence – the chain of experience – as put forth by Andy Grove in the How to Make an American Job article in BusinessWeek.

Different Forms of Filtering Create Different Forms of Value by Tim Kastelle

Ethan Zuckerman wrote a very interesting post today called What if Search Drove Newspapers? He talks about several different initiatives designed to gauge readers’ interest in different news stories, particularly those that are currently under-reported, and then devising methods for reporting stories on these topics. He asserts (correctly, I think) that this is basically search-driven content development. In particular, this is a strategy that will work well with Google.

A young mind is a healthy mind by Jorge barba

I wrote an article for On Innovation a few weeks ago and it was published yesterday: Finding your crayons: Innovation inspiration from the young. Initially I wanted the the article to be titled ‘A young mind is a healthy mind’ but I guess that didn’t say much, but here then is what I mean in a nutshell:

How to Foster a Culture of Innovation by Mitch Ditkoff

Looking for some inspiration and tips on how to make your company more conducive to innovation? Here’s some food for thought and action — Idea Champions’ ten most popular postings on the subject.

Designers: Stop Armchair Quarterbacking. Play The Damn Game by Gadi Amit

As a naturalized American the 4th of July is an opportunity for me to reflect about this great country. As a designer I noticed a few media streams that have come together to paint an interesting picture–a picture that should be talked about in design circles just as much as any new trend or eco-philosophy.

Why Business Leaders Should Act More like Artists by John Maeda

Stereotypes abound about artists: they range from the mild (“they have fuschia-colored hair”), to the absurd (“they starve,”), to the disturbed (“they do things like uncontrollably peeing in the fireplace as depicted in the popular movie Pollock.”). Granted I know artists with wild-colored hair and others who are certainly struggling to make ends meet, but they all choose to use the restroom. I’ve also met artists who are quite plain-looking and plain-acting CEOs, lawyers, stockbrokers, and scientists.

Enjoy it!

(Texto em Português depois deste)

Design thinking – Why  simplicity?

The answer I seek guidance or involve two seemingly contradictory concepts, complexity and simplicity.

The complexity is the field of emergency services, composed of many different parts and connected in unpredictable flows.

Using the words of Tim Brown to find an anchor of writing, “I think the simplicity, complexity, or maximalist or minimalism all have a role to play in the design.”

From simple ideas we can create interactions with other ideas and the expected results are the complexity. The simple rules usually create complex results.

We therefore as a reality that carries an extra job when transpose this observation to other fields. I remembered now how many simple situations we have in organizations and that have become so complex and difficult to resolve because we added something on it.

By observing a pallet, a container or a lego, all objects representing simplicity we can identify four principles: predictability, affordability, performance and ability to agglomeration.

Inside organizations especially when teams are interdisciplinary and with various origins (domestic and foreign) if the organizational behavior is simple – keep it simple.

This way of using simple things to build complexity underlying the existence of the internet or set of Mandelbort, which became popular both for its aesthetic appeal as being a complicated structure due to a simple definition.

Donald Norman states that “once we recognize that the real issue is finding things that are understandable, we are halfway towards the solution. Good design can save us. How do we manage complexity? We use a series of simple design rules. For example, consider how three simple principles can transform an unruly cluster of confusing features an experience, structured and understandable: modularization, mapping and conceptual models. There are several important design principles, but these will make the point. ”

The question, more salient, that Norman refers is that we should not speak of simplicity but of understanding, which removes the polarization that I create at the beginning with the concepts.

But the content of thought is maintained through the use of modularization that is we have an activity (complex) and we divide it into smaller modules capable of managing. Is the case with HP multifunction printers designed to perform tasks with scanners, copiers and fax machines. HP has created a mechanism for joint control, “simplicity” to the same principle that governs the use of all functions.

Likewise when we seek to manage people or groups of people, we must seek the ignition (main function), to improve performance or manage conflicts.

Learning how to do a function we know how to do them all.

I understand and it is simple.

Maeda however, goes further and says that the first law, the laws of simplicity, is reducing.

Just because I am able and it works, does not mean I’ll have to add. I have to focus on people and realize that not all are scientists or have higher reasoning abilities or handling.

Not everyone has the same powers of empathy and not all have the same language skills or of technology use.

In a process of innovation often are imported  new profiles and environments that are not identified with the existing importer.

There are many differences that matter call to solve problems. Consider the action of P & G to solve big problems with simple things such as razors for ladies.

In the laws of simplicity referred arises also the question of the organization.

Build a sensible hierarchy so users are not distracted by features and functions that do not need. After most of the objects we use in everyday life are not games with a high difficulty of enforcement.

Similarly to the people who work in organizations do not build heavy and matrix hierarchies, in order to simplify the observation of authority and facilitate the flow of communication.

I have my tendency to simplicity and acknowledge that some things are never simple.

But if the guidance is to simplify without taking away comfort or well-being, create balance then the results are magnificent.

We will not need to multiple functions that sometimes it is better to ignore. The need is Queen!

We get to Law No. 10 – “Simplicity is about subtracting the obvious and adding the meaningful.”

Simplicity or Complexity?  What is the trend?

Pensar design – Porquê a simplicidade?

A resposta ou orientação que eu procuro envolve dois conceitos aparentemente contraditórios, a complexidade e a simplicidade.

A complexidade é o domínio da emergência, composto por muitas partes diferentes e conectadas em fluxos imprevisíveis.

Utilizando as palavras de Tim Brown, para procurar uma âncora de escrita, “acho que a simplicidade, complexidade, minimalismo ou maximalismo, todos têm um papel a desempenhar no design”.

A partir de ideias simples podemos criar interacções com outras ideias e esperar que os resultados sejam a complexidade. São as regras simples que usualmente criam resultados complexos.

Ficamos assim, como uma realidade que transporta um acréscimo de trabalho, quando transpomos esta constatação, para outros campos. Lembrei-me agora de quantas situações simples nós temos nas organizações e que vêm a tornar-se complexas e portanto de difícil resolução.

Ao observarmos uma palete, um contentor ou um lego, todos objectos representando a simplicidade podemos identificar quatro princípios: a previsibilidade, a acessibilidade económica, a performance e a sua capacidade de aglomeração.

Nas organizações, principalmente quando as equipas são interdisciplinares e de origens diversas (interna e externa), se o comportamento organizacional é simples deve manter-se simples.

Este caminho de utilizar coisas simples para construir complexidade está na base da existência da internet ou no conjunto de Mandelbort, que se tornou popular tanto por seu apelo estético como por ser uma estrutura complicada decorrente de uma definição simples.

Donald Norman afirma que “uma vez que reconhecemos que a verdadeira questão é descobrir coisas que são compreensíveis, estamos a meio caminho em direcção à solução. Um bom design pode salvar-nos. Como podemos gerir a complexidade? Nós usamos uma série de regras de design simples. Por exemplo, considere como três princípios simples pode transformar um aglomerado desregrado de recursos confusos numa experiência, estruturada e compreensível: modularização, mapeamento, modelos conceptuais. Existem inúmeros princípios de design importantes, mas estes irão fazer o ponto.”

A questão, mais saliente, que Norman refere é que, não devemos falar de simplicidade mas de compreensão, o que afasta a bipolarização criada com os conceitos.

Mas o conteúdo do pensamento mantém-se através do uso da modularização, isto é temos uma actividade (complexa) e dividimo-la em pequenos módulos passíveis de gestão. É o caso das impressoras multifuncionais HP concebidas para realizar tarefas com scanners, copiadoras e aparelhos de fax. A HP criou um mecanismo de controlo comum, “simplicidade”, para os mesmos princípios que rege o uso de todas as funções.

Do mesmo modo quando procuramos gerir pessoas ou grupos de pessoas, devemos procurar a ignição (função principal), para aumentar a performance ou gerir conflitos.

Aprendendo a fazer uma função, então sabemos como fazer todas elas.

Eu compreendo e é simples.

Maeda contudo, vai mais longe e diz que a primeira lei, das leis da simplicidade, é reduzir.

Só porque eu sou capaz e isto funciona, não significa que eu vou ter que adicionar. Eu tenho que me centrar nas pessoas e perceber que nem todos são cientistas ou possuem elevadas capacidades de raciocínio ou de manuseamento.

Nem todos têm as mesmas competências de empatia e nem todos têm as mesmas competências linguísticas ou de uso de tecnologia.

Num processo de inovação, muitas vezes, importam-se perfis e ambientes que não se identificam com os existente no importador.

Há muitas diferenças que importa chamar para resolver problemas. Veja-se a actuação da P& G par resolver grandes problemas com coisas simples, como as lâminas de barbear para senhoras.

Nas leis da simplicidade referidas surge ainda a questão da organização.

Construamos uma hierarquia sensata para que os usuários não se distraiam com características e funções que não precisam. Afinal a maior parte dos objectos que utilizamos no quotidiano não são jogos com elevado índice de dificuldade de execução.

Do mesmo modo para com as pessoas que colaboram nas organizações, não se construa hierarquias pesadas e matriciais, de forma a simplificar a observação da autoridade e a facilitar os fluxos de comunicação.

Eu tenho a minha tendência para a simplicidade e reconheço que há coisas que nunca serão simples.

Mas se a orientação for no sentido de simplificar sem retirar conforto ou bem-estar, criamos o equilíbrio, e então os resultados serão magníficos.

Não necessitarei de múltiplas funções que por vezes mais vale desconhecer. A necessidade é rainha!

Fiquemos com a Lei nº 10 – “A simplicidade consiste em subtrair o óbvio e acrescentar o significativo.”

Simplicidade ou complexidade? Qual a tendência? Comente!

Lembrar John Maeda

Há quem advogue que a complexidade é bonita e há quem prefira a simplicidade sem ser minimalista.

Eu pessoalmente admiro a complexidade como figura a explorar e que possibilita a observação curiosa de alguns pormenores.

No entanto não posso cair na tentação de Leonardo da Vinci e “antes de passar de um pormenor para o próximo devo demorar-me o tempo suficiente para o apreender”. Isto é verdade se a complexidade não for tão vasta ao ponto de consumir todos os meus anos em observação.

Por isso eu admiro a simplicidade!

Um dos princípios das “leis da simplicidade” cujo autor é John Maeda é a redução:

– A maneira mais fácil de simplificar um sistema é remover uma funcionalidade. È preciso contudo ter cuidado com o que se remove pois a redução tem significado se se mantiver o equilíbrio entre o simples e o complexo.

A segunda lei é a organização. Um sistema eficaz de organização permite arrumar tudo o que precisamos e domina a complexidade.

Esta organização permite também uma economia de tempo e esta economia pode resultar da velocidade a que imprimimos os nossos actos. Se evitar ficar à espera não desespero e tudo fica mais simples.

Para as coisas ficarem ainda mais simples junte bastante aprendizagem, porque o conhecimento liberta tarefas de tentativa desnecessárias ao uso de equipamentos ou ferramentas.

È verdade! Simplicidade e complexidade precisam uma da outra! E porquê? Porque à medida que a complexidade aumenta, como é o caso da tecnologia, mais premente é a simplicidade oferecida ao utilizador. Considerando que os utilizadores não estão todos no mesmo meio ambiente importa considerar o contexto para que a simplicidade seja real.

A sétima lei de Maeda é fundamental para a vida. “ Mais vale mais emoção do que menos”. É fácil entender que os objectos ou uma história bem contada transmitem emoções se eles e elas nos conseguirem por dentro de si. “È simples, eu gosto!” e mais do que isso, “É simples, eu confio”.

Apesar desta minha dedicação às coisas simples eu sei que há coisas que nunca podem ser simples. Mas isso não serve de desculpa para usar a tantas vezes enunciada frase “É muito complexo, não é para mim”.

A simplicidade consiste em subtrair o óbvio e acrescentar o significativo.

A constante evolução da tecnologia e das redes sociais fez-me evocar estas leis da simplicidade escritas por Maeda.

Cada vez mais temos à nossa disposição um conjunto de ferramentas para comunicar, com cada vez mais aplicações disponíveis para utilizar e muitas delas trazem consigo a complexidade sem oferecerem o bónus da usabilidade.

Ou então são tão simples que não me permitem a velocidade desejável ou a abrangência que eu preciso.

Felizmente há ferramentas que são resultado de um equilíbrio entre a simplicidade no uso e a complexidade necessária para a sua eficácia de funcionamento.

Quer comentar? É simples!

A minha sandwich em Design Thinking

A resposta ou orientação que eu procuro envolve dois conceitos aparentemente contraditórios, complexidade e simplicidade.

Complexidade é o domínio da emergência, composto de muitas partes diferentes e conectadas que flui e é imprevisível.

É como diz Tim Brown, “acho que a simplicidade, complexidade, minimalismo, medialismo maximalismo, todos têm um papel a desempenhar no design. Noutra altura afirmava também que ”as ideias simples são mais úteis quando podem interagir com outras ideias simples para criar complexidade. Voltar para regras simples criar resultados complexos.”

Uma das propostas de conceito de simplicidade, diz que , simplicidade é construída com base em quatro princípios: a previsibilidade, a acessibilidade económica, a performance e a sua capacidade de aglomeração. É um pouco como o lego, a palete ou o contentor.

Este caminho de utilizar coisa simples para construir complexidade está na base da existência da internet ou no conjunto de Mandelbort, que se tornou popular tanto por seu apelo estético como por ser uma estrutura complicada decorrente de uma definição simples.

Donald Norman afirma que “uma vez que reconhecemos que a verdadeira questão é descobrir coisas que são compreensíveis, estamos a meio caminho em direcção à solução. Um bom design pode salvar-nos. Como podemos gerir a complexidade? Nós usamos uma série de regras de design simples. Por exemplo, considere como três princípios simples pode transformar um aglomerado desregrado de recursos confusos numa experiência, estruturada e compreensível: modularização, mapeamento, modelos conceptuais. Existem inúmeros princípios de design importantes, mas estes irão fazer o ponto.”

A questão, mais saliente, que Norman refere é que, não devemos falar de simplicidade mas de compreensão, o que afasta a bipolarização criada com os conceitos. Mas o conteúdo do pensamento mantém-se através do uso da modularização, isto é temos uma actividade (complexa) e dividimo-la em pequenos módulos passíveis de gestão. É o caso das impressoras multifuncionais HP concebidas para realizar tarefas com scanners, copiadoras e aparelhos de fax. A HP criou um mecanismo de controlo comum, “simplicidade”, para os mesmos princípios que rege o uso de todas as funções.

Aprendendo a fazer uma função, então sabemos como fazer todas elas. Eu compreendo e é simples, mas Maeda vai mais longe e diz que a primeira lei, das leis da simplicidade, é reduzir.

Só porque eu sou capaz e isto funciona, não significa que eu vou ter que adicionar. Eu tenho que me centrar nas pessoas e perceber que nem todos são cientistas ou possuem elevadas capacidades de raciocínio ou de manuseamento. Há muitas diferenças que importa chamar para resolver problemas. Veja-se a actuação da P& G par resolver grandes problemas com coisas simples, como as láminas de barbear para senhoras.

Nas leis da simplicidade referidas surge ainda a questão da organização. Construamos uma hierarquia sensata para que os usuários não se distraiam com características e funções que não precisam. Afinal a maior parte dos objectos que utilizamos no quotidiano não são jogos com elevado índice de dificuldade de execução.

Eu tenho a minha tendência para a simplicidade e reconheço que há coisas que nunca serão simples. Mas se a orientação for no sentido de simplificar sem retirar conforto ou bem-estar, criamos o equilíbrio, e então os resultados serão magníficos. Não necessitarei de múltiplas funções que por vezes mais vale desconhecer. A necessidade é rainha!

Fiquemos com a Lei nº 10 – “A simplicidade consiste em subtrair o óbvio e acrescentar o significativo.”

Simplicidade ou complexidade? Qual a tendência? Comente!

 
 

Reduzir

John Maeda

é professor de Media Arts & Sciences do MIT e no seu livro “As leis da Simplicidade” fala de 10 leis, orientações ou reflexões para enfrentar a complexidade da “tecnologia”, onde proliferam os menus e os manuais.

A primeira lei da simplicidade de Maeda é reduzir. Não é necessariamente benéfico adicionar funções tecnológicas só porque podemos. Será que muita gente precisa deles? Ou será porque pensei neles e já está!

Os recursos que temos devem estar organizados com uma hierarquia clara para os utilizadores e para que não haja lugar a distracção com características e funções que não precisam.

Tantas vezes nos queixamos de não ter tempo e afinal somos utilizadores de ferramentas que nos devoram as horas. Nós queremos ter tempo para aprender porque pensamos que o conhecimento torna tudo mais simples. Menos tempo com o uso e mais com o usufruto.

Ser sociável é um bem ao alcance de todos o que permite explorar a complexidade das relações. Esta complexidade resulta da diferença entre as pessoas e torna as relações mais ricas, mas estas são simples. É o elogio da diferença: complexidade e simplicidade precisam uma da outra.

As relações sociais precisam de um contexto. O contexto, proporciona-nos emoções e reside na simplicidade que gera confiança.

Maeda fala ainda do fracasso e de como se deve aceitar que algumas coisas não são simples.

E finalmente a única: “A simplicidade consiste em subtrair o óbvio e acrescentar o significativo.”

John Maeda apresenta três soluções:

Distanciamento – O afastamento torna o que parece “MAIS”, “menos”

Abertura – Dá uma visão mais simples.

 Energia – Usando menos ganha

Simplicidade, usabilidade e elegância ajudam. Basta pensar.

Tagged with:
 

Complexidade ou simplicidade

Uma nova abordagem de conceitos vem alimentar as possibilidades e crescimento do pensar design.

“Eu sou um campeão da elegância, simplicidade e facilidade de uso. Mas, como uma pessoa de negócios, também sei que as empresas têm que fazer para ganhar dinheiro, o que significa que eles têm que entregar os produtos que seus clientes querem, e não os produtos que eles acreditam que eles deveriam querer. E a verdade é que a simplicidade não vende. Por quê?” – Donald A. Norman

A hipótese que agora surge é uma alteração à estrutura do debate sobre a lógica que sustenta as preferências dos consumidores e como ser inovador.

Por um lado os consumidores reclamam mais capacidade nos produtos e portanto, mais recursos. Toda a gente quer facilidade no uso, e por isso, querem simplicidade.

Na opinião de D.A. Norman essa lógica simples é falsa, pois segue as implicações no sentido inverso.

Os que as pessoas querem são produtos usáveis, o que se traduz por produtos compreensíveis.

A complexidade é necessária: é a confusão e a complicação desnecessária que deve ser eliminada.

Sabendo nós que o conhecimento faz a diferença, sabemos que a compreensão derrota a complexidade.

O que importa portanto é que o pensar design proporcione um modelo conceptual coeso e compreensível, para que a pessoa entenda o que está a ser feito, o que está a acontecer, e o que é de se esperar. Isto exige um feedback informativo contínuo a exemplo da necessidade de contacto regular com os consumidores evocada por Tim Brown.

MUJI

Estamos a falar de Design emocional que é fundamental para a fruição de um produto por parte de uma pessoa.

A variável mais importante aqui é a necessidade de a pessoa se sentir no controlo. Isto é especialmente importante quando as coisas dão erro. A chave é o design, ao saber que as coisas estão mal, está garantido que as pessoas vão entender o que está a acontecer e sabem o que fazer.

A questão não está entre adicionar recursos e simplicidade, entre a adição de capacidade e facilidade de uso. A verdadeira questão é sobre o projecto: projectar coisas que têm a potência necessária para o trabalho, mantendo a compreensibilidade, a sensação de controlo, e o prazer da realização.

“Eu sempre fui um fã da marca Muji marca. E gosto especialmente da forma como Muji simplesmente expressa o seu ponto de vista sobre como a simplicidade é enganosamente complexo, pois é um processo pensativo.” – John Maeda”

Em pensar design todos os caminhos vão dar à voz dos consumidores.

Afunilo um monte de ideias…

a que chamo convergência (apróximação a um valor definido de uma visão comum ou opinião ou ainda para um estado de equilibrio).

No linguagem de negócios podemos dizer que se trata de uma técnica, onde ideias de diferentes àreas ou participantes de um grupo de trabalho são colocadas juntas para encontrar uma única solução óptima a um problema definido de forma clara.

Ao procurar resolver um problema não devo apenas procurar a única solução.

É importante que seja única e se possível que resulte da subtração de elementos não rentáveis ou meramente acessórios. Algumas aplicações informáticas são um bom exemplo disso (excesso de funcionalidades).

Esta possibilidade (subtrair) vai de alguma forma comprometer um velho hábito que é “…e se tivesse mais isto? Ficava mais completo!”.

Eu diria ficava mais completamente complicado, (não confundir com complexo).

Importa a simplicidade, sinónimo de agilidade de processo e de rapidez. A simplicidade facilita a aprendizagem e permite a abragência da população a que se destina o processo ou produto e promove a elegância.

Um conceito, que emerge e que acomanha muitas vezes o negócio, chamado elegância, aquilo que não é habitual e é simples ou uma questão de bom gosto até nas palavras. 

 

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6ILQrUrEWe8]

De uma nuvem de ideias convergiu uma solução fruto de subtracções cujo resultado foi a elegância com requintes de simplicidade!

A inovação!

Aconselhamento: Leitura sobre o trabalho de John Maeda