Currently viewing the tag: "Idris Mootee"

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Creating ‘Places of Possibility’ by Rotman via Ralph-Ohr

With the analogue generation still in control of the organization and the digital generation performing the daily work, clashes are imminent and inevitable.

 

Make Little Bets for Innovation Success by Tim kastelle

To succeed at innovation, you need to be making a lot of little bets. What are little bets? According to Peter Sims in his excellent book called Little Bets, they are:

 

Caffeine: It Undermines Performance on Collaborative Tasks for Men, Enhances It For Women by Bob Sutton

I can’t believe that I missed this study reported by BPS research last January.  Way cool.  It compared the performance of men working in pairs to women working pairs.

 

Three Ways to Get the Most Out of Each Moment by Jesse Lyn Stoner

Learn from the past, plan for the future, and live in the present.

How can you have a vision and live in the present? Don’t you live for the future?

 

Rockstart Studios knows how to innovate by Jorge Barba

Yesterday I wrote about how innovation requires courage. It takes guts and vision to do something that is so remarkable, that it changes everything. Here then, is a great example.

 

The Surplus Society by Luke Williams

If you’re seeking disruptive innovation with a team—or even if you’re doing it alone—you need to identify the assumptions that seem to influence the way insiders (and often outsiders) think about your industry, segment, or category.

 

Going flat? Creating the freedom to succeed by Dov Seidman via Arie Goldshlager

What if leaders of flat organisations invested as much effort in inspiring people to build cultures without “boxes” by constructing a new mindset for the behaviour they want as they invest in deconstructing the vertical and functional restraints that limit space in hierarchical structures?

 

Design Thinking, Business Transformation And The Creative Enterprise. By Idris Mootee

It is time to take a look at the report card of our design for business organization, management and strategy. After half a century of quality movement, brand management, marketing and catefory management, globalization, customer service automation and organizational design fine-tuning, we should have a pretty good of idea of what is working and what is not.

 

What Are You Telling the World? By Kare Anderson

How do others perceive you? How well do you anticipate another person’s discomfort before the person freezes up and becomes paralyzed, withdrawn, or even destructive in a situation.

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The Problem With Communications Planning by Greg Satell

What is communications planning? I don’t mean to be cheeky, but I would assume that it should have something to do with communicating.

 

How ‘Sticky’ is Design Thinking? By will novosedlik via @ralph_ohr

On its way to meme-hood, even before it has had a chance to gain purchase in the minds of the people who need it most, the term ‘design thinking’ is showing signs of mutational stress that threaten a common understanding of its value and validity.

 

Employees don’t always share well with others, says new paper exposing “knowledge hiding.” By Rotman via @ariegoldshlager

Why isn’t knowledge transfer happening more often in companies spending money on it?

Maybe it’s because their staff don’t always want to share.

 

The Problem with Fitting New Ideas Into Old Business Models by Tim Kastelle

Malcolm Gladwell retells the story of the Xerox Palo Alto Research Center in the latest issue of the New Yorker (it’s readable behind a paywall here). The story of PARC is fascinating, and Gladwell provides a nice twist to it. One of the main threads in the story concerns their invention of the laser printer.

 

The Beginning of a New Discipline by Idris Mootee

Prague is mystical with a mix of medieval, Renaissance, and Art Nouveau architecture and the design scene is slowly taking shape. You still see traces of history of what communism had done to the city even after these buildings are completely restored. It is where Renaissance meets neo-Gothic and the baroque structures from the 18th centuries

 

Creating Infectious Action – Innovation Uncensored by Jennifer Aaker

“Slideshare”

 

The Different Taxonomies of Open Innovation by OIC editor

Professor Henry Chesbrough speaks with Gary Hamel, Visiting Professor of Strategic and International Management at the London Business School and Director of the Management Lab.

 

Can You Be Happy at Work? Should You Be? By Liz Alt Kislik

Consider these scenarios, each from a different organization, and the unfortunate, but logical, conclusions that can be drawn from each one:

 

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You Get Better at What You Do by Tim Kastelle 

If you want to get better at innovation, you have start innovating more.

That probably sounds obvious, but in practice, not all that many people do it.

I was reminded of this by an interesting post by John Gruber discussing Apple’s transition to cloud computing. It includes this section:

 

10 Divergent Strategies – Break through the Box! By Robyn McMaster

Why is it that creative people tend to break rules? Innovators imagine something that will work better. They don’t like being boxed in, but somehow have a glint in their eyes for the adventure of a challenge. Is that where you see yourself?

 

Why Trends Are For Suckers by Greg Satell

It feels good to be trendy.  You can be sure that you’ll have a lot of company.  And that’s exactly the problem.  It’s easy to go wrong when everybody around you thinks it’s right.

 

Paradox of Innovation & Intellectual Property by Deb Mills-Scofield

Yesterday was the 3rd Open Innovation Summit at BW‘s Center for Innovation & Growth: Practical Challenges of Global Open Innovation featuring P&G.  Too much happened for one post so I’m going to do one on each panelist’s story and discussion, starting with Kelly McDow, Associate General Counsel for P&G’s Connect+Develop.

 

A Cool Neurological Explaination for the Power of Small Wins by Bob Sutton

Regular readers of this blog know that I am a huge fan of the power of small wins, and following Karl Weick’s classic article, have argued in Good Boss, Bad Boss and here at HBR that big hairy goals cause people to freak-out and freeze-up if they aren’t broken down into smaller stepping stones.

 

Seven Steps To Better Brainstorming. Or May Be There Are More. Is Brainstorming The Right Word? By Idris Mootee

Let’s start with this…this is not the best title. I really don’t like the word “brainstorming.” It means a group of people getting together to generate a lot of deas for the solution of a problem.

 

Why Right Brainers Will Rule The Future By Diane Jacobsen

Traditional business thinking has generally followed a linear, compartmentalized process that molded the sum of its various known parts into a logical, pragmatic solution. This process was born primary out of the dawn of manufacturing, which attenuated the sequenced progression, and didn’t allow for continuous discovery, collaboration, rapid prototyping, or integrated thinking.

 

We Have Designed, We Build, You Will Runby by Thierry de Baillon

However we want to call it, Enterprise 2.0, social business or collaborative whatsitsname, what we are watching now is a vendors-claimed increasing evolution toward maturity of leading platforms. During its last symposium, the Gartner Group held a session entitled “Managing Social Software Maturity: Supporting Pioneers and Settlers“, and is predicting a near-billion figure for the social software market in 2011.

 

The Cycle of Innovation (Closing Thoughts) by Paul Williams via Ralph Ohr

Hopefully our step-by-step review of the Continuous Innovation Loop has been helpful.  I wanted to use a separate blog entry to focus on how the individual steps link together.

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Design Thinking Is Failed Experiment? How Can That Be Because The Experiments Have Barely Started? Bruce, Not Too Fast! By Idris Mootee

This is my response to Bruce Nussbaum’s lastest Fast Company’s blog declaring “Design Thinking” is over and that he is moving on to something new. He is calling it “Creative Quotient” which is really his new book, I was wondering why he would make that statement.

 

Mental Bodybuilding for Knowledge Workers by Riitta Raesmaa

I stumbled upon a beautiful video about Michael Wolff, an acknowledged British graphic designer. I am not a part of the design professionals’ clan, but his message touched me. I think his way of thinking is applicable to all of us knowledge workers who are trying to cope with the changing work environment.

 

Is subtractive thinking the new normal? By Jorge barba

Apple is on everybody’s minds these days. Yesterday, along with my partner and new team member ( @dario_rivera), I was talking to a client about a few observations we had about some processes in their restaurant operation and how we think they are creating bottlenecks.

 

Innovation Without Entrepreneurship Doesn’t Make A Lucrative Business by Andrew Penny via @ralph_ohr

A lot has been said about creating an Innovative Culture. Research labs, government departments and agencies are all trying to figure out just how to make us innovate. The thought being that innovation equals wealth creation.

 

Understanding the Language of Innovation by H. James Wilson via @ariegoldshlager

We all know innovation has its own language conventions, rich with revolutions, evolutions, ecosystems, and more. This may seem like a harmless dialect that simply reflects the nature of the work.

 

Structure, Agency and Open Innovation by Greg Sattel

As a young student, Nobel laureate Eugene Wigner took up physics because he felt stupid in math class.  John von Neumann, his classmate at the Fasori Gimnázium and one of the great mathematical geniuses of the 20th century, was simply in another league.

 

The Antibodies Sitting in the Innovation Petri Dish by Paul Hobcraft

For many years I’ve been fascinated by these ‘Corporate Antibodies’ that we find in that classic management pathology that instinctively rejects and refuses to alter its ways, so as to protect itself.

 

The AIR Model (Action, Intention, Result)by Sinan Alhir

Human nature and every human endeavor can generally be explored as a Meaningfully-Purposeful Enterprise relative to two dimensions, a system dimension and a socio-cultural dimension, with hundreds if not thousands of perspectives/paradigms, models, bodies of knowledge, etc.

 

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Diferentes focos sobre o medo?

 

Pode não se tratar apenas de resistência á mudança mas também pode ser o  medo do desconhecido o que bloqueia as organizações ao olhar para o futuro pensando em inovação.

Idris Mootee aconselha o mapeamento do espaço em branco em inovação como uma ferramenta para superar os medos.  

“Espaço em branco é um processo e uma ferramenta que nos permite olhar a paisagem da cadeia de valor para cima e para baixo com uma lente nova. Ele pode ajudar a descobrir oportunidades que não são óbvias. Ele pode identificar novas aberturas intocadas por concorrentes, ou ele pode ser considerado parte do que tradicionalmente foi considerado uma indústria remota, diferente ou fora dos limites da empresa.”

A descoberta de oportunidades surpreendentes não se faz exclusivamente por serendipidade. Essa descoberta de oportunidades únicas pode ser o resultado de um trabalho criativo e de pesquisa consistente e orientada.

O processo pode ser usado para identificar mercados inteiramente novos, ou pode ser usado para mapear inovação incremental em produtos ou serviços.

Para preencher esse espaço em branco é importante conhecer os interesses e necessidades dos clientes, isto é compreender como os indivíduos pensam e descobrir os seus “mapas cognitivos”, isto é, as suas necessidades ocultas.

A análise que está por trás de necessidades ocultas não é simples. Fazer perguntas pode ser ineficaz e por isso necessitamos de novas abordagens desenhadas em grande parte pela antropologia e psicologia, para descobrir opiniões e crenças das pessoas.

Quando uma organização se apercebe da necessidade de descobrir novos caminhos de desenvolvimento e procurar novos espaços de actuação, olhar para um espaço em branco sem preconceitos ou prisões de esquemas o melhor caminho é partir de um espaço em branco e dar-lhe cor.

Idris Mottee aponta três focos para o mapeamento do espaço em branco:

A perspectiva focada no exterior que “começa com o mapeamento do mercado, produtos ou serviços nos seus mercados e determinar se estes são servidos, parcialmente servidos ou não servidos. O objectivo é encontrar as lacunas existentes nos mercados, produtos ou linhas de serviços que representam oportunidades para o negócio”.

Não se procura apenas conhecer o posicionamento da organização no mercado mas sobretudo procurar uma aproximação ao desconhecido ou oculto através de um processo centrado nas pessoas. As necessidades não articuladas podem representar uma lacuna a preencher.

A perspectiva focada internamente permite mapear as capacidades da organização para lidar com novas oportunidades ou enfrentar as ameaças por parte dos concorrentes. “Este processo é usado para determinar a eficiência e a eficácia da reacção às oportunidades e ameaças de processos, sistemas estruturais e perspectivas”.

Nesta altura alguns dos medos mais profundos possivelmente começam a surgir e poderão caminhar em direcção à sublimação. As pessoas tendem a mostrar-se competentes mesmo reconhecendo falta de competências em alguns domínios.

A perspectiva focada no futuro no “processo de mapeamento de espaço em branco irá colocar ênfase na aplicação de prospectivas estratégicas. Normalmente, há um horizonte de tempo não inferior a cinco anos e envolvendo a entrada de exercícios de prospecção estratégica”.

Quando se fala de futuro ou de prospectiva o nosso ponto de partida pode variar muito, desde um perfil analítico até ao do sonhador e visionário.

Para muitos analíticos este processo de mapeamento pode tornar-se difícil e até doloroso. Os medos de embarcar numa viagem não determinada pelo passado ou exclusivamente por tendência podem (imagino) bloquear a visualização do futuro.

Basicamente a base deste processo são as pessoas, o conhecimento que possuem e a capacidade de tirar conclusões prospectivas de registos de necessidades e desejos de outras pessoas. O espaço em branco pode proporcionar o medo de preencher algo sem ter certezas e pode proporcionar um bloqueio á intuição, mas quando bem trabalhado pode resultar na expressão de potencial encoberto e numa grande oportunidade de negócio.

Um espaço em branco pode permitir a passagem de um mistério (por exemplo, como é que as pessoas querem comer no mundo de hoje) – à heurística (um restaurante num ambiente de alto tráfego) para o algoritmo (um processo que pode ser replicado e implantado com velocidade).

Será que os medos são suficientemente fortes para impedir a descoberta de novos espaços?

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12 Sparks for Heads-Up Creativity by Robyn McMaster

Do you find your creativity at a lull and needing a jolt at times?  For extra spark, gain insights from leaders and designers to jump-start your creativity.  Consider the following:

 

Three Steps for Inventing the Future by Tim Kastelle

That’s the idea that framed yesterday’s post – Where’s My Flying Car? I argued that as innovators, our job is to invent the future – and that in doing so, instead of trying to come up with something that has never existed before, like a flying car, we’re better off trying to figure out how things that already exist can be redesigned so that they mean something completely new.

 

Why I’m Glad I Got Fired by Nilofer Merchant via @timkastelle and @ralph_ohr

I came to be an expert on collaboration because Carol Bartz both hired me and fired me — within 18 months. Here’s what happened.

 

Creativity – Risk or Regret? By Ellen Weber

If you agree with Sir Ken Robinson that creativity gets clobbered at school, you’ll likely also agree it takes risk to create and lead a finer future.

 

Making creative connections: What matters is that you make them by Jorge Barba

While there are a lot of organizations that aggregate trends (see Trend Hunter and Trend Watching to name a few), people often ask me how believable those trends are and if they should be arriving at the same conclusions while doing their own trend hunting.

 

Game Mechanics and Landscape Design for Customer Value Creation by  Riitta Raesmaa

I recently met a marketing professional who had seen the “social light”, or should I say Social Business Light. He was stressed about the fact that most of his colleagues and the management “don’t understand the value of social media and what is happening within marketing communication”. Very familiar set up!

 

The Power of Observing and Talking to Real Humans by Bob Sutton

Although Good Boss, Bad Boss focuses more squarely on the relationship between bosses and their immediate charges, one of the main themes of the book — following a design-thinking view of the world — is that the best bosses go to great lengths to develop empathy for both the people they lead and the customers served by their teams and organizations. 

 

“Build to Fail” And “Fail To Build” Can Have Different Meanings. To Fail Is Part Of To Build. To Fail Is To Hep To Build To Last. I Hope I’m Not Confusing You. By Idris Mootee

In London this week, fully packed with meetings. Staying at St. Marins Lane and it is one of my favourite hotels in London. Both for style and location even I am not the saturday night crowd that hangs out in the cocktail lounge. I am getting a lot of work done writing and editing for the next issue of M/I/S/C. Deadline is a few days away.

 

Innovation – Matching Needs and Solutions by Ralph Ohr

While revisiting some collected innovation readings, I recognized that it might be important to briefly emphasize again one “fundamental”: the distinction between needs and solutions.

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What is the Customer’s Role in Breakthrough Innovation?

by Ralph Ohr

There has been quite a lot of discussion recently about a post by Jens Martin Skibsted and Rasmus Bech Hansen, titled “User-Led Innovation Can’t Create Breakthroughs; Just Ask Apple and Ikea”. Their major claim is: “Great brands lead users, not the other way around.”

 

With The Emerging Of The New “Object-Culture” – Meanings Are Sought Through Social Identities, Visual Information and Interfaces / Interactions by Idris Mootee

There are objects that I love for many different reasons. They range from my Leicas to my JBL speakers, LV bags, Prada shoes and Mac computers.

 

For Innovation, Best Practice is a Verb not a Noun! By Deb Mills-Scofield

One of the central tenets of 20th Century business has been ‘best practices’.   Let’s dissect this veritable oxymoron:

  • Best: highest quality, standing (at a point in time, place and context)
  • Practice: a habit or custom (noun) or to do repeatedly to acquire proficiency

 

Follow-up on Destroying Customer Value: @Telfort is listening.. by Wim Rampen

Last week’s post Destroying Customer Value was in it’s essence not about getting attention from the Telco company involved (being Telfort).

 

Reviewing “A New Culture of Learning” by John Hagel

We all have the uncomfortable feeling that the education we received is serving us less and less well. The reassuring notion that the concentrated dose of education in our younger years would serve us well for the rest of lives appears increasingly suspect.

 

Dinosaur Communications Hold You Back? By Ellen Weber

Dinosaur communication departments impede innovation, much like spiked speed bumps obstruct an Indianapolis 500 race.

 

Design renews its relationship with science by Tim Brown

I have noticed a growing conversation recently concerning the relationship between design and science.

 

New Research: We Are More Creative When We Help Others Than Ourselves by Bob Sutton

There is an interesting set of findings from psychological experiments that suggest we see others’ flaws and strengths more clearly than our own (I wrote about this in Good Boss, Bad Boss) and that, on average, human-beings make more rational decisions when make them for others rather than themselves.

 

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Reinventing Management – A Process by Deb Mills-Scofield

As we look around us, 20th C regimes, institutions and businesses are failing.  It seems everyone is writing a book on management needs to change.

 

Unlocking your creativity to fulfill your personal vision by  Jorge Barba

I love this! Talk about freeing your mind, here’s a high powered conversation you don’t want to miss…

 

Building Creative Collaboration by Greg Satell

Soft power, noted Joseph Nye, is the power to get what you want without coercion.  That’s a good kind of power to have, but hard to define.  Nye argues that it is a combination of lots of things, like economic success, technological prowess, good governance, lack of corruption, etc.

 

A lesson about (de)motivating employees by Dan Ariely via @ralph_ohr

A few months ago an ex-student of mine, who was at the time working for a big software company, contacted me and asked me to meet with her and her team later in the summer.

 

Taking Work-Life Balance By The Horns by Judy Martin

A colleague recently told me she was suffering from anxiety about heading back to work, after a week off.  In gory detail, she described a nightmare in which her manager littered her office with big black hairy spiders. Pretty much how she feels at work, she effused.  “The creepy crawlies never seem to go away.”

 

I am a Knowledge Worker and a Serendipity Hippie by Riitta Raesmaa

Last weekend I attended Professor Esa Saarinen’s seminar, and as always I was touched and inspired by his thinking. Few days earlier futurist Jarno M. Koponen wrote a beautiful blog post about creative future thinking. Both of these gentlemen touched on a question I’ve been thinking lately:

What metrics should we apply for open innovation? By Stefan Lindegaard

I hear more and more requests on how to apply metrics to open innovation.

Personally, I do not really believe in metrics. The innovation community (companies, consultants and academics) has tried this for the last 20 years on innovation in general, but no success.

 

The Next Time You Pick Up The Phone To Call A Customer Service Agent You Might End Up Talking To An Inmate In Tijar, India by  Idris Mootee

Global customer servicing outsourcing is touching us everyday and sometimes you don’t know who you’re talking to on the phone or online when you call your service provider.

 

Is Open Innovation Sustainable? Video Interview with Henry Chesbrough

Professor Henry Chesbrough speaks with Gary Hamel,Visiting Professor of Strategic and International Management at the London Business School and Director of the Management Lab.

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The Art of Impossibility  by Umair Haque

Here’s a thought to chew on while you’re considering your new year’s resolution: if it’s not laughably impossible, hopelessly impractical, preposterously insurmountable—stop. Start over. You’re not doing it right.

The Neuroscience Of Music by John Lehrer

Why does music make us feel? On the one hand, music is a purely abstract art form, devoid of language or explicit ideas. The stories it tells are all subtlety and subtext. And yet, even though music says little, it still manages to touch us deep, to tickle some universal nerves.

Innovation – A New Match Between Need and Solution by Ralph-Christian Ohr

While revisiting some collected innovation readings, I recognized that it might be important to briefly emphasize again one “fundamental”: the distinction between needs and solutions.

 

A Rationale for Pursuing Open Innovation by Stefan Lindegaard

CoDev 2011 is coming up next week in Scottsdale, AZ. As part of the effort to build exciting for the event, for which 15Inno.com serves as a media sponsor, they hosted a webinar last week entitled “Expanding Open Innovation Networks to Solve Difficult Technology Roadblocks.”

 

Passion and Plasticity – The Neurobiology of Passion by John Hagel

What if you could evolve and shape your brain in ways that help you to get better faster? What if you could unleash a virtuous cycle that connects passion, practice and performance? 

9 Practices for Cultivating Creative Aliveness by Michelle James

The following practices are not necessarily in a linear order, and you might go back and forth between them. It’s not as much about a sequence as it is about engaging and responding in the moment: sometimes listening receptively; others times creating it out actively.

Laser Focused Products Are More Emotional by Jorge Barba

This post isn’t about Steve Jobs, it’s about emotion and how to create it with your product.

 

Meetings and Bosshole Behavior: A Classic Case By Bob Sutton

One of the themes in Good Boss, Bad Boss, as well as some of my past academic research (see this old chapter on meetings as status contests), is that bosses and other participants use meetings to establish and retain prestige and power.

 

Powerful And Affordable Real Time Data Mining, Visualization And Interactions Are Powering Up A New Culture Act – And Enabling “Infovation”. By Idris Mootee

Just landed in Rhode Island and spendin the next 2 days in Providence, long working sessions ahead, expect to some productive knowledge exchange. The topic will be around where arts meets science, design meets technology.

 

The Chemistry of Storytelling Marguerite Granat

Stories are what make us human. I can’t think of an aspect of our lives that is not affected by them. We begin our young lives with lots of storytelling. I have fond memories of stories that I heard as a child, and I’m sure you do too.

Have a nice weekend!

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The Art of Integrative Thinking by Roger Martin and Hilary Austen via @ralph_ohr

Modern leadership needs integrative thinking. Integrative thinkers

embrace complexity, tolerate uncertainty, and manage tension in searching for

creative solutions to problems.

 

Adam Smith Explains the Network Economy by Tim Kastelle

The economy is a network. To understand how new ideas integrate into it, we first have to understand how interconnected and interdependent it is. Here is a passage from The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith making this point (from Adam Gopnik’s good review of Smith’s work in The New Yorker):

 

Working With Strangers to Solve Open Innovation Challenges: What’s It Like? By Stefan Lindegaard

In writing and making public presentations about open innovation, I often remind people that while process is important, in the end success comes down to having people with the right mindset and skills. So much can be accomplished when a good team comes together, even when that team consists of experts in various disciplines around the globe who are total strangers to one another.

 

It’s Time for Some New Habits–the Year of the Meaning Organization by Umair Haque

This time of year we tend to subject ourselves to tough review. We zero in on our practices and tendencies and resolve to take up new, positive habits–and, more importantly, to break the bad. It can be a productive exercise if approached with a clear eye and dedicated follow-through. My question: why don’t we subject our institutions to the same ritualistic rigor?

Surprise yourself by Jorge Barba

We all have different likes and dislikes. That’s just how it is. A personal example how is I like video games and although I do have preferences for shooters, sports and espionage; I’ll give any genre a shot.

 

We Need To Change The Way We Use Trash, One Imagination At A Time. It Is About Behavior As Much As Economics. By Idris Mootee

We all love shopping and some do more than other. We love to buy shoes, clothes, electronic gadgets, toys and cameras. We all know we can’t continue on like this, the stuff we buy today is way worse than what we were buying a decade ago, everything has tons of electronic components inside which is really hard to recycle.

 

Team Guidelines From A New Boss: How Can He Make Sure People Live Them? By Bob Sutton

I got a fascinating note from an employee of a big company about the “team norms” that were articulated by his new boss.  I think they are great, but have a crucial question about them. Here they are: 

 

Happy or Valuable New Year? By Deb Mills-Scofield

21st century capitalism is shifting focus from making money to making meaning (ends vs. means, trailing indicators v leading indicators). This is good and necessary.  However, ‘happiness’ is starting to dominate discussions about 21st C capitalism, even in governments’ measures of economic growth

 

Have a nice weekend!