Currently viewing the tag: "Greg Sattel"

 

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Design Thinking Is Failed Experiment? How Can That Be Because The Experiments Have Barely Started? Bruce, Not Too Fast! By Idris Mootee

This is my response to Bruce Nussbaum’s lastest Fast Company’s blog declaring “Design Thinking” is over and that he is moving on to something new. He is calling it “Creative Quotient” which is really his new book, I was wondering why he would make that statement.

 

Mental Bodybuilding for Knowledge Workers by Riitta Raesmaa

I stumbled upon a beautiful video about Michael Wolff, an acknowledged British graphic designer. I am not a part of the design professionals’ clan, but his message touched me. I think his way of thinking is applicable to all of us knowledge workers who are trying to cope with the changing work environment.

 

Is subtractive thinking the new normal? By Jorge barba

Apple is on everybody’s minds these days. Yesterday, along with my partner and new team member ( @dario_rivera), I was talking to a client about a few observations we had about some processes in their restaurant operation and how we think they are creating bottlenecks.

 

Innovation Without Entrepreneurship Doesn’t Make A Lucrative Business by Andrew Penny via @ralph_ohr

A lot has been said about creating an Innovative Culture. Research labs, government departments and agencies are all trying to figure out just how to make us innovate. The thought being that innovation equals wealth creation.

 

Understanding the Language of Innovation by H. James Wilson via @ariegoldshlager

We all know innovation has its own language conventions, rich with revolutions, evolutions, ecosystems, and more. This may seem like a harmless dialect that simply reflects the nature of the work.

 

Structure, Agency and Open Innovation by Greg Sattel

As a young student, Nobel laureate Eugene Wigner took up physics because he felt stupid in math class.  John von Neumann, his classmate at the Fasori Gimnázium and one of the great mathematical geniuses of the 20th century, was simply in another league.

 

The Antibodies Sitting in the Innovation Petri Dish by Paul Hobcraft

For many years I’ve been fascinated by these ‘Corporate Antibodies’ that we find in that classic management pathology that instinctively rejects and refuses to alter its ways, so as to protect itself.

 

The AIR Model (Action, Intention, Result)by Sinan Alhir

Human nature and every human endeavor can generally be explored as a Meaningfully-Purposeful Enterprise relative to two dimensions, a system dimension and a socio-cultural dimension, with hundreds if not thousands of perspectives/paradigms, models, bodies of knowledge, etc.

 

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THE DARK SIDE OF BEST PRACTICES by Michael Wade via @ariegoldshlager

How can you possibly argue with best practices? These practices are, more often than not, superior to your own. Indeed, best practices embody how the best firms within an industry conduct business. By adopting them, you can share in that success. So, if they are better than what you currently have, and they are proven to be effective in your industry, then why not make the switch?

 

The Power of Synthesis and the Problem with Experts by Greg Sattel

How much do we need specialized experts for the information economy?

If history is any guide, probably not much.  It makes little sense for capable people to spend an entire career doing the same job when they would probably be much more effective if they gained experience in more than one area.

 

Are you Benevolent Dictator or BrainPowered Facilitator? By Ellen Weber

10 Key differences between…Leader traits.

 

The Rotman Design Challenge: A Review by Helen Walters

In recent years, calls for a more creative or innovative approach to, well, pretty much everything but our financial instruments, have become more pointed. As the western economy in particular has evolved away from its industrial roots and as the Internet has wrought digital havoc on the old, understood ways of doing things, so have many accepted that the education of those who will effectively lead progress toward a healthy, sustainable future must also shift — and fast.

 

Insultants not Consultants: Balancing Mastery and Questioning by Jorge Barba

Though people/clients see me as a Consultant, I’ve never really liked the label of Consultant and don’t really consider myself one because I don’t specialize. I’m more of an ‘Insultant in Residence’, not a Consultant.

 

Get in touch with your Inner Jester to have a more joyful life by Teresa Van Lanen

Here I am just recently flying a kite on the beach and laughing. Having fun and laughing on vacation is not too hard to do for most of us. But at times finding our inner jester can be difficult. With April fools day upon us I felt this topic would make a great article, enjoy!

 

Four Roadblocks for a Corporate Network Culture by Stefan Lindegaard

In working with companies that are trying to build a networking culture, here are some reasons I’ve identified for why such efforts can fail or not reach the hoped-for degree of success.

 

The art of innovation by Kate Oakley, Brooke Sperry and Andy Pratt via @ralph_ohr

In the 21st century, the UK’s economic competitiveness and social wellbeing will increasingly depend on our ability to innovate. A significant part of the innovation process revolves around ‘creativity’ – the ability to generate new ideas, or to restructure and redeploy old ones.

 

When Customer Rebellion Becomes Open Revolution by Umair Haque

What if your business isn’t just fundamentally ill-equipped to survive and thrive in the 21st century — but is actually unequipped for it?

 

Art and design in service of our world by John Maeda

I’m on a video call with the World Economic Forum Global Agenda Councils that links together experts across the world in response to global challenges. The topic of our call is centering around the situation in Japan. Prof. Toshiko Mori of Harvard shared how there is a gallery in Tokyo that is informing citizens, using art and design, as to how one-third of the electricity in Tokyo utilizes the failed nuclear powered plants — and the importance of saving energy right now in Tokyo.

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Putting Higher Principles into Innovation Management: How to Be Guided by The Classical Approach to People by Deb Mills-Scofield

As innovation becomes a prevalent activity in organizations is it time to rethink how we approach the culture of innovative people? Deborah Mills-Scofield who previously worked with Bell Labs and now consults on innovations practice, argues we need a return to timeless values if we are going to make innovation sustainable.

 

Why Customer Services isn’t always that important! By Wim Rampen

When reading “the web” one could be lead to think that a company’s poor Customer Services is the worst that could happen. Any mistake in this area would easily set off negative word-of-mouth. Armed with Social Media the “crowds” will seriously harm the brand(ed) reputation, seriously damaging a company’s growth opportunity. Some even consider Customer Services the new Marketing. The importance of Customer Services though, which in lots of cases is considered to be the same as the importance of a company’s (multi channel) customer services contact center, can easily be overrated.

 

A Lesson in Engaged Artistry by Gianpiero Petriglieri via Ralph Ohr

Orchestra conductors are surely overexploited by management thinkers to describe what effective leaders do in organizations. They attract and inspire talent, strive for excellence, discipline improvisation, foster innovation, set pace, build and resolve tension, and transform potential cacophony into melodious harmony—all with unique, personal style.

 

Innovation starts with empathy by Jorge Barba

A recent article on Fast Co. Design ‘Innovation always starts with empathy‘ got me thinking about empathy and for some reason I remembered the above text from  Colours of the wind from Disney’s Pocahontas.

 

14 smart tips from single women entrepreneurs by Daniel Pink

Erin Albert is a multi-talented, multi-tasking pharmacy professor at Butler University (Go Bulldogs! Beat Wisconsin!) who runs a couple of businesses and is pursuing a law degree on the side. Since she obviously has lots of time on her hands, she’s also just written a book.

 

“Design Thinking” Isn’t a Miracle Cure, but Here’s How It Helps by Helen Walters

The term has come in for a lot of scorn. But it’s because we haven’t been clear about what it actually entails, argues Helen Walters.

 

How Innovation and IT Drive Productivity by Andrea Meyer

Point: Getting maximum benefit from innovation requires new organizational practices

Story: In their book Wired for Innovation, Erik Brynjolfsson and Adam Saunders show how innovation and IT drive productivity growth. Productivity growth explains how cars, for  example, went from costing an average of three years of salary a century ago to costing only seven months of salary today

 

How Technology Evolves by Greg Sattel

Sometimes it’s hard to tell if technology is something to love or to fear. Are computers making us smarter or dumbing us down? Are genetically modified foods a miracle or a menace?

 

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Redesigned Thinking for Diverse Brains! by Ellen Weber 

Why does design thinking exclude diversity at work, when it could include more brainpower for innovative renewal? Design thinking, according to Dr. Roger Martin – Dean of Rotman School of Management – in a recent HSM online seminar,  calls upon two ways of thinking.

 

All Life is an Experiment by Tim Kastelle

Uncertainty is one thing that makes a lot of people uncomfortable. Unfortunately, in most business situations, uncertainty is a fact of life.

Graham Hill made an interesting response to my post yesterday about simplistic, complex and simple models. He said:

The real world is complex . Most businesses simplify the complexity to ‘manage’ it. Complex is too hard!

 

Social Wolf in Sheep’s Clothing, ready for the Social Business? By Riitta Raesmaa

I recently found my old thesis, and yes, some of its topics and content are (still) relevant, as this one: the evolution of organization and work structures. The very same topic Esko Kilpi is researching. The discussion in my old thesis and Esko’s blog posts inspire me to learn more about this topic.

 

“Have Some Sugar” and Six Other Ways to Be Good: Evidence from BPS Research by Bob Sutton

One of the my favorite blogs on the planet is BPS Research,  where folks from the British Psychological Society summarize the latest psychological research — and do so with delightful charm and accuracy.  I was just visiting (it is a great place to look around) and, as part of just one post, they offer “7 Ways to Be Good.”

 

Find the revolution in constraints by Jorge Barba

Before I fell in love with technology my intent was to become an architect. Because of this I have an acute sensitivity with architects, so when I heard about the ideas of Bjarke Ingels a few years ago I was blown away.

 

Managing the Hype Cycle by Greg Sattel

Should you believe the hype?

Hype, much like the proverbial soldier’s girlfriend, doesn’t exactly lie, but doesn’t tell the whole truth either.  We’re told our whole world will change, lots of journalists and investment bankers drive expectations further and then we are inevitably disappointed.  Only later, we find that, after all, there really was something to it all along.

 

Dan Ariely on irrationality in the workplace McKinsey Quarterly  Via  @ralph_ohr

The behavioral economist explains why executives need to recognize—and embrace—the irrational forces that affect themselves and their employees.

 

The unbearable lightness of design thinking by Guido Stompff

My latest blog: the unbearable lightness of designthinking. It considers 4 contesting paradigms / woldviews on innovation, based on a famous model of Daft and Weick (1984). These paradigms can be explained alongside two axes:

 

Brain Surgery, Corporate Culture & Leadership Consistency by Alicia Arenas

The anticipation, wondering if it was benign or cancerous (it was benign), praying that the neurosurgeon would not suddenly get the shakes, being in a hospital away from home and having no family nearby all added up to make this one of the most stressful experiences I’ve gone through in a long time.

 

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