Currently viewing the tag: "Greg Satell"

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Creative thinking is not a one time activity by Jorge Barba

Late last year, in response to an article that stated that you need to stifle your creativity in order to get promoted, I argued that you needed to become a credible innovator to cut through the smoke and keep those objections at bay.

 

Pave the way for impact by striking a balance between the small and the big Jenny Comiskey via Ralph Ohr

Attempting to solve large-scale social challenges can be an overwhelming task. They are the domain of messy, interdependent, complicated issues, outdated models, and often mired in the status quo. It’s not unusual to face a paralysis in action or become stuck in endless debate when attempting change within this environment.

 

Iteration, Collaboration, and Innovation by Deborah Mills-Scofield

 “Even a brown box can be innovative when you think about supply chain, how you bring it to market,” Waite says. But that can only happen if you provide an atmosphere where your employees’ innovation can thrive.

 

Mind the Gap by Tim  Kastelle

I did a workshop last week with a group working on improving innovation within the Australian school system. I played my normal role of grenade-thrower, errr, thought-provoker on the topic of innovation, while working with eight other people that all have backgrounds in education.

 

Five Easy Ways To Tell If An Organization Is Really Values-Driven by Jesse Lyn Stoner

What do Zappos, Ben and Jerry’s, and Southwest Airlines have in common? They are all financially successful, values-driven companies.

 

How to Fix the System by Greg Satell

Pissed off at the system?  Most people are, as they should be. Systems suck.  Anybody who says he likes the system is either a liar, a fool or the guy who created it in the first place.

 

How NOT to Disrupt Yourself or The Pioneer-Maintainer’s Dilemna by Marion Chapsal

After read­ing @JohnsonWhitney’s excel­lent post on Har­vard Busi­ness Review, “Dis­rupt Your­self”, which encour­ages pio­neer and innovator’s val­ues, one of the com­ments caught my attention.

 

Towards Implementing Effective Employee-Driven Innovation Systems by Arie Goldshlager

This article outlines several of my key findings from a recent implementation of an Employee-Driven Innovation system.  The system facilitated generation, evaluation, development, promotion, and selection of employees’ ideas:

 

Ray Anderson: how to show the art of the possible by Mallen Baker

Ray Anderson has sadly lost his fight against cancer.
It’s worth reflecting on the example he gave, because it isn’t just that he was an inspirational figure who argued for a sustainable business model.

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Riding the Whitewater Rapids – 5 Life Lessons by Jon Mertz

One thing can be said about me – I am not a water-sports-type-of-guy. After nearly drowning as a very young kid, I never learned how to swim until I was in my early 20s, but that is another story…

 

Finding Your Next Big (Adjacent) Idea by James L. McQuivey via Ralph Ohr

It’s unusual that an analyst will ask you to stop thinking about the far future, but I need you to back away from the Corning A Day Made of Glass video on YouTube. All that clear glass is clouding your vision.

 

Would You Like a Smile With That? By Arie Goldshalager

This New York Times Case Study of Pret a Manger is packed full of instructive and innovative employee engagement and customer service practices.  See for example:

 

Innovation: Do What You Can, With What You Have, Where You Are by Tim Kastelle

One of the key points that Peter Sims makes in Little Bets is that if you wait until your idea is perfect before you act on it, your chances of success are greatly reduced. This means that if you are trying to innovate, you have to be able to work with what you have right now.

 

Gulp – Extreme Creativity in Stop-Motion Animation by Mike Brown

After writing about extreme creativity for a couple of days, here’s a real-life example: Gulp, the world’s largest stop-motion animation film. It’s extreme creativity in that it takes the skill set (manipulating and filming inanimate objects in a very controlled indoor setting) and scale (small) of typical stop-motion animation films in a completely different direction:

 

5 Principles of Creativity by Greg Satell

Back in the 1880’s, Frederick Winslow Taylor was able to make dramatic gains in efficiency by timing workers performing rote tasks.  His efforts spawned the idea and practice of scientific management.

 

Is Open Innovation Superficial? By Stefan Lindegaard

Perhaps the question should be: Is the term, open innovation, superficial? The topic was raised at the Open Innovation Summit in Chicago after a presentation given by Susan Harman, Group Manager, Open Innovation at Intuit.

 

You Can’t Innovate If You Ignore Your Real Problems by Sohrab Vossoughi

Struggling companies often look to momentary design solutions, but, Ziba’s Sohrab Vossoughi warns, they won’t succeed unless they embrace internal change.

 

What is your Open Innovation partnering approach? By Kevin McFarthing

Open Innovation is now an accepted methodology for enhancing your new product or service development pipeline.  It is deployed to varying degrees depending on the industry or even the company attitude.

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Renaissance.. by Wim  Rampen

This morning I was listening to news coverage on the Oslo attack.. I don’t have this often, nor soon, but shivers continue to go down my spine listening to survivor stories and even when thinking about them..

 

Systems Intelligence, Serendipity and Listening for the Better Decisions by Riitta Raesmaa

I’ve earlier blogged about how I find intuition and seeing the value of the tacit knowledge as very interesting perspectives for the decision-making.

 

How Social Network Analysis Solves Real World Problems by Greg Satell

I’m LinkedIn.  I’ve got friends on Facebook.  I tweet.  Yo, I got stooopid Klout!  Look at me!  I’m connected!

And so are you and lots of other things, like ecosystems, molecules, our bodies’ metabolisms, the list goes on.

 

Innovation as a Means for Economic Evolution by Paul Hobcraft

Economic growth is an outcome of the innovation trajectory we set. Today managing innovation is complex; often success is measured and valued by the creative destruction of others.

 

Paradox of Innovation & Status Quo by Deborah Mills Scofield

As much as I love change, innovation, #RCUS (Random Collisions of Unusual Suspects per Saul Kaplan) and challenging the Status Quo, I realized how much the comfort and haven of some Status Quo means to me as we got settled at our place in Maine. 

 

In the Eye of the Beholder by Jason Plaks via Ralp Ohr

Imagine two people, Jim and John. Jim planned to succeed in business and accomplished his goal through a series of deliberate steps. John fell into the exact same business success through serendipity and coincidence.

 

A Trick of the Mind by Ronald Bailey

Superstitions arise as the result of the spurious identification of patterns. Even pigeons are superstitious. In an experiment where food is delivered randomly, pigeons will note what they were doing when the pellet arrived, such as twirling to the left and then pecking a button, and perform the maneuver over and over until the next pellet arrives

 

Bust Your Innovation Myths by Art Markman

It is common to tell stories of great discoveries. Hundreds of years later, we still talk about Galileo Galilei dropping balls of different weights off the Leaning Tower of Pisa to shatter existing beliefs about the way objects fall

 

Nothing kills an idea faster than common sense by Luke Williams

In his book This Means This, This Means That, Sean Hall asks readers to vote on which of two sentences is the best. “The cat sat on the mat.,” or “The cat sat on the dog’s mat?”

I know that may sound painfully simple, but it illustrates the point beautifully.

 

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Good Ideas and Great Ideas by Greg Satell

The world is full of ideas, but very few good ones. As an old saying goes, “ideas are like assholes, everybody’s got one and they’re usually full of shit.” They are, however, important.

 

Two Footed Questions Fuse Arts and Science by Ellen Weber

Two-footed questions drive curiosity and they can  convert even ordinary minds, into expert problem solvers?

 

The Role of Relaxation in Consumer Behavior by ScienceDaily via Ralph Ohr

This phenomenon is demonstrated in six experiments involving two different methods of inducing relaxation, a large number of products of different types, and various methods of assessing monetary valuation.

 

Vision: How It’s Created Is As Important As What It Says by Jesse Lyn Stoner

If you want to create a vision that engages the hearts and spirits of everyone in your organization, remember what’s important is not only “what it says” but also how it’s created.

 

Little Innovations Matter! By John Steen

What’s better…. a lot of little innovations or one big innovation? If we had to choose, would it better to have an economy made up of a lot of firms trying to make small improvements to their business or do we want a game-changer like Apple or Google?

 

Management by Imagination by Roger Martin

The perception that good management is closely linked to good measurement runs deep. How often do you hear these old saws repeated: “If you can’t measure it, it doesn’t count”;

 

Strategic Innovation And The Quest For Breakthrough Ideas by Idris Mootee

Innovation is now a very hot topic at the C-Suites. I have speaking a lot on the subject the last 5 years. The funny part is I am talking about Strategic Innovation and many still talk about Technology Innovation as if it was the sole source of innovation.

 

A Talk On Fast Innovation, All In One Great Picture by Bob Sutton

A couple weeks ago, I did a talk on “fast innovation” at IDEO.  I gave the talk from a powerpoint deck, but at the same time, while the audience and I discussed the talk, there was a guy named Kevin Bain who does this thing called
“graphics scribing.”

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What’s Your Platform for Value Co-Creation? By  Graham Hill

A couple of years back I wrote a speculative blog post at CustomerThink entitled How Customer Co-Creation is the Future of Business. In many ways my prediction was right, Customer Co-Creation IS the future of business, but not exactly in the way I had imagined.

 

Two Footed Questions Fuse Arts and Science by Ellen Weber

Two-footed questions drive curiosity and they can convert even ordinary minds, into expert problem solvers?

Marketing, Science and Pseudoscience by Greg Satell

“Science” is a word that gets thrown around a lot.  We hear that “scientists say” so and so and then hear later that other scientists say something totally different.

 

More Mental Oomph though Others! By Robyn McMaster

Just go down diagonally…

 

Come On Over by Nilofer Merchant

First, I would spend a month or two in a frenzy of painting, and buying new furnishings that I wanted to arrive immediately, hanging art up in just the perfect spot, updating floorboards, changing out light fixtures and, well, obsessing to make the place “homey”.

 

Why Creative People Are Rarely Seen as Leaders by Susan Cain via Ralph Ohr

We are in love with the word “Eureka,” and for good reason.  Creativity is magic: the ability to create something out of nothing, to make connections that others don’t see.

 

Strategic Innovation And The Quest For Breakthrough Ideas by Idris Mootee

Innovation is now a very hot topic at the C-Suites. I have speaking a lot on the subject the last 5 years. The funny part is I am talking about Strategic Innovation and many still talk about Technology Innovation as if it was the sole source of innovation.

 

A step backward by Tim Brown
The UK has long had an impressive track record of producing successful designers and engineers. Many credit that success to a focus on design within the education system. Significant investments were made in the second half of the 20th Century on design and engineering programs at the University level but more importantly for the last 20 years design and technology has been mandated as part of the core curriculum in high schools.

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Why Diversity is Good for Business by Jeanette Mulvey via Ralph-Ohr

There’s lots of talk about innovation being the key to growing American businesses, but exactly how companies get innovative remains less clearly defined. One way to drive innovation, according to a new Forbes study, is to hire a more diverse work force.

 

Getting Open Innovation Participation by Andrea Meyer

Point: Crowdsourcing and open innovation efforts rely on participation.  Attracting participants and encouraging activity is a key success factor in obtaining and vetting new product, service and process innovation ideas.

 
‘Better’ is the more practical approach to innovation in general by Jorge Barba

It all starts with the question: How can I make this better?

Framing is important and when talking about innovation that usually means deciding between incremental and radical change. Yet for most businesses, they don’t want to hear about change. They want the world they exist in just the way it is, especially if they’ve had some level of success.

 

Set Up Your Team for Success by Jesse Lyn Stoner 

Do you have a new team or are you starting a new project? Most teams rush into the work of the team without getting clear agreements in the beginning about where they are going or how they want to get there.

 

And the All Time Winner is… by Wim Rampen

We’ve already past the first 6 months of this year. A good time to take a look at what you have been reading around here. I’ve put together two lists: one Top 5 of all time best viewed posts and one Top 5 of the best viewed posts over the first six months of this year.

 

Incumbentitis – The Anti-Innovation Disease by Deb Mills-Scofield

Well, will congress put the country or their own political careers first?  You’d think they should be one and the same but we know they aren’t. With the upcoming elections, getting re-elected will matter more.  In 2010, it was out with the ‘old’, in with the new, mostly.  Washington DCers (and Wall Street) want desperately to maintain the status quo, yet America is asking for government by the people, of the people and for the people (sound familiar?). Can the US Government re-invent itself? Well, can big established companies even do it?

 

Transformation further Distilled by Sinan Si Alhir

Thriving and high performing organizations are founded on strong cultures, which involve shared values, strategy alignment, and interconnection. Such organizations achieve 4 times higher revenue, 7 times more expanded work force, 12 times higher stock prices, and 756% higher net income. However, approximately 70% of all change initiatives focused on improving performance fail!

 

The Mona Lisa Code by Greg Satell

Everybody knows the Mona Lisa.  She’s iconic; as much of a symbol of art as art itself. Housed in Paris but reproduced everywhere, there is probably nothing else on earth that so thoroughly fuses the ridiculous and the sublime as the Mona Lisa.

 

The New Game Of Strategy: Applied Design Thinking In Business Innovation And Transformation by Idris Mootee

Just when I thought I can have 2 days in an office then I realized I have to be In NYC tomorrow for a few days. I am writing this post on a flight after missing my connection in Houston, and just finished teaching a three days Strategy graduate course with a focus on strategic innovation and design thinking.

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Diversity, complexity, chaos and working smarter by Harold Jarche via Ralp-Ohr

Here are some of the things I learned via Twitter this past week.

What Diversity Really Means by Alicia Arenas

There was a pretty fantastic Twitter conversation happening last week on #TChat; it was about diversity. Be sure to check out the preview on MonsterThinking and the #TChat recap.

 

SOMETHING NEW: MEASURING TEAM IQ by Karsten Jonsen via Arie Goldshlager

Teams have intelligence just like individual people do. But the intelligence factor of human groups is not simply the average of its members, in fact that has only little to do with it.

This Space Intentionally Left White by Sabina Nawaz

Looking for an edge over your competition? Searching for an untapped market? Try slowing down to see more, two hours at a time.

 

 

Value Co-Creation Canvas by Wim Rampen

Presentation

6 Ways to Spot Liars and Fools by Greg Sattel

Some people are dishonest, some are just plain stupid and lots write articles and provide commentary.  Inevitably there’s going to be some intersection between the three sets.

Random Thoughts On Muggles, Magic And Design Thinking by Idris Mootee

For those of you who are not familiar with Muggles, they are people who are incapable of magic, and who are usually unaware of the wizarding world. Design Thinking is sort of like wizardries, it takes certain type of people with the certain type of training, Hogwarts or Harvard.

Laughter sets your mind free by Jorge Barba

A few days ago I was part of a brainstorming session for a client who recently opened a new restaurant in Mexico. The goal of the brainstorming session was to come up with ideas on how to create an experience that would make customers talk about it to their friends.

Picking the Big Idea by Nilofer Merchant

Most of us make things happen, get results, and deliver. But ask us if we’re focused on building our vision, on our big goals or if we even know what our big goal is, and what will likely follow is some combination of this: a big pause, or a look down at the carpeted floor, or talk of corporate handcuffs, or a nervous laugh, or a sudden change of subject.

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The Innovation Matrix Reloaded by Tim Kastelle

This is a bit of a distillation of observations over time.  I thought of it because I think that a lot of people that are trying to improve innovation within an organisation think that they can go from the bottom left (No Innovation Capability) to the top right (World Class Innovator) in one jump, simply by introducing some sort of innovation program. 

 

Would You Skydive Without a Parachute? How to Delegate With Confidence. By Jesse Lyn Stoner

Roger had been working way too much and knew he needed to reprioritize and delegate. But he was nervous about letting go of control and was having difficulty identifying what he could delegate.

 

Value Networks and our Sense of the Beautiful by Verna Allee

In a wonderful Ted Talk Denis Dutton traces our sense of the beautiful back to the earliest prehistoric artifacts of hand axes. Hand shell necklaces, body paint, and hand-crafted objects preceded even language. Dutton reminds us that beauty is not in the eye of the beholder, it is deep within us as an innate gift. Our powerful reaction to images, to emotion in art, to the night sky will be with us as long as the human race exists.

 

The Simple Dilemma by Greg Satell

“Keep it simple, stupid” is often repeated and invariably good advice. Nevertheless, it’s easier said than done.  The truth is that simplicity is anything but simple

 

Claiming Our Circle of Selves. The Shadows… by Marion Chapsal

Are you ready to embark on your heroine’s journey?
Before we embark together, let me give you a gentle reminder. One of the myths around coaching and personal development, is that it will enable you to discover your “true self”, your “authentic voice” and clearly reveal “your unique path”.

 

GenY: The Challenge of “Doing It All” and Technology Overload by Katrina Kibben

This is not your father’s workplace anymore – literally. This year, the oldest Baby Boomers are turning 65 years old, including President Bill Clinton.   This means that the 79 million baby boomers, about 26 percent of this country’s population will be retiring in the next few years.

 

People Skills Mistakes Won’t Define You If … by Kate Nasser

Interacting with others can be carefree or treacherous depending on the situation. Using your best people-skills steers you through the tough moments. But what if you make a mistake?

 

Lessons from a crowdsourcing experiment by Jorge Barba

One of the great things about social media is that it gives organizations the capability (if they choose to) and advantage of co-creating new products and services with their customers.

 

Father as leader by John Maeda

I have regular open office hours for students, staff, and faculty — a practice that is often suggested for college presidents and for other leaders — the so-called “open door” philosophy. You learn all kinds of things about your organization when you do so.

 

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A simplicidade não é complicada

 

Simplicidade é uma percepção que temos de uma experiência e não reside no produto ou no serviço.

A simplicidade é a solução minimamente satisfatória que chega com o menor custo e como uma percepção que depende de mim e do contexto onde a experiência é vivida.

A simplicidade é uma função do tempo, do dinheiro, do esforço físico, das regras e da rotina.

– O tempo importa porque se eu tenho pouco tempo disponível é bom que a solução seja aplicada rapidamente.

– O dinheiro é quase sempre fundamental porque se eu tenho pouco dinheiro preciso de preços simples (baixos).

– Quanto menos esforço despender na solução mais simples ela é, isso significa que o meu cérebro também tem descanso.

– Se as regras são quebradas eu sinto-me desconfortável com receio da crítica social.

– E se a rotina é alterada o desconforto acentua-se.

Muitas pessoas concordam em absoluto com estas afirmações e para eles a simplicidade, embora diferente de pessoa para pessoa, é tudo o que é percebido como produzindo pouco consumo, seja tempo ou energia.

Uma tarefa é percebida como simples se uma pessoa a completa com menos recursos do que o esperado, isto é, uma tarefa é simples se a pessoa esperava que a solução seja mais difícil.

Por isso as expectativas têm um grande papel na simplicidade!

Quando realizamos uma tarefa a forma como percebemos a simplicidade pode ir de um grau, mais elevado, semelhante a admiração até ao mais baixo como a frustração. Dependendo da dimensão do custo e do nível dos benefícios esperados também podem resultar em sentido de gratidão ou de competência a crescer, contentamento ou de satisfação, de sensação de ressentimento ou de impotência.

“Regras simples para um mundo complexo” é um dos pontos abordados por Greg Satell no seu excelente artigo “O simples dilema” e onde podemos ler:

“A evidência é clara: Não há nada simples sobre a simplicidade. O nosso mundo está a ficar cada vez mais complexo. O poder computacional está a aumentar exponencialmente. As barreiras estão a romper-se. Os resultados são extremamente sensíveis às condições iniciais porque os eventos se materializam a partir de interacções não planeadas.

Portanto, o nosso objectivo não deve ser a buscar maior simplicidade, mas no máximo de gestão e existem alguns princípios básicos que nos podem ajudar a fazer isso.” – Greg Satell

Embora eu concorde com muito do que Greg diz eu sinto uma vontade enorme de continuar a procurar maior simplicidade e porque a simplicidade é percepcionada de forma diferente de pessoa para pessoa eu também procuro gerir a complexidade.

De facto o mundo em que vivemos está cheio de desordem e cheio de contradições.

A energia que nos faz mover surge do conflito de escolhas e de emoções.

Raramente temos um leque razoável de opções e muito menos oportunidade de criar uma nova. Quase sempre somos conduzidos a premir o botão nas escolhas que nos são oferecidas e para as quais o nosso contributo foi nulo e onde o nosso conhecimento se resume muitas vezes a algumas ancoras aí deixadas para não causar rejeição. Mas nem sempre é assim!

“Nós gastamos muito tempo a estudar como tornar as coisas mais simples — como fazê-las centrados no utilizador. É importante ficar pensativo sobre isso. Pensativo bastante não para simplificar as coisas da maneira usual, deitando fora todas as peças complicadas.” – LARRY KEELEY, Presidente, The Doblin Group

A simplicidade tem como missão fazer o complexo claro.

A simplicidade procura criar uma determinada ordem, mas que alavanca a alteração dinâmica, a experimentação, a emergência de ideias, a inovação e a aprendizagem.

Esta ordem resulta da criação de clareza e significado para as pessoas que realizaram o seu trabalho.

A simplicidade funciona porque se baseia na natureza humana e no senso comum, não na lógica corporativa.

Primeiro: Começar com o pressuposto de que a maioria das pessoas quer fazer coisa certa e fazer a diferença.

Segundo: Reconhecer que estamos a viver num mundo de infinitas escolhas, e que a maioria das pessoas realmente estão a esforçar-se para descobrir o que fará a maior diferença. (Lembrar que mesmo que você tenha criada uma visão partilhada, a necessidade humana para fazer as próprias escolhas vai saltar fora sempre.)

Conclusão: Criar ordem através da clareza. Investir em como as pessoas realmente fazem escolhas.”

Esta é a minha simplicidade!

Quer comentar?

Inspirado em Bj Fogg e Greg Satell

 

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Analytics And Info Overload: Insights From eBay, Adobe, And Oracle by Adrian Ott

Are analytics a prescription for information overload? Three top Silicon Valley tech titans share views on what’s new in e-commerce and retailing.

Last week I moderated a panel for FountainBlue which explored the latest trends and opportunities in e-Commerce and Retail Analytics. This panel included three distinguished executive panelists from Oracle, eBay and Adobe, namely:

 

How Technology Makes Us Smarter by Greg Satell

Are we getting smarter or dumber?  That’s a question that goes back at least 2000 years to the time of Plato.

 

Why you need to break out of your network to innovate by Jorge Barba

Yesterday @JuhaLipponen shared his post on how gathering people from diverse backgrounds to brainstorm breeds new and fresh insights. This idea of bringing in outsiders to shake things up isn’t new, but it’s definitely one that you don’t find being practiced more widely.

 

“Service design” is what exactly? By John W Lewis

The term “service design” seems to have been cropping up in a variety of contexts recently. This sounds interesting, possibly useful and, perhaps even, ground breaking.

However, based on initial investigation, I am non-plussed and increasingly sceptical.

 

The Challenges of Real Change Required by Innovation Consultants by Paul Hobcraft

Recently I was reminded of an article by Daniel Krauss, writing on the Forrester blog site (http://blogs.forrester.com) about the “Path to Revolution In Management Consulting” which lead me to reply to his question of “what constitutes a management consulting firm 2.0?”

 

Ten Good Reasons Not To Delegate by Jesse Lyn Stoner

A few years ago, Frank, a senior leader, asked if I could run a training program to teach his people how to delegate better. When I asked him what problem the program would solve, he shared his frustration.

 

The big can, the small do by The Economist via @ralph_ohr

 

MIKE KONCZAL has written an interesting post considering whether large corporate oligopolists or small fry are more likely to do the heavy lifting of innovation. He quotes Arpit Gupta, who says:

 

Designing our library future: be involved or be forgotten by Zaana Howard

What is the future of the Library? What is the future of the Librarian? These are questions we hear and see discussed ad nauseum at conferences, in blogs, in our tea rooms. In reality the ‘future library’ has already snuck in the back door. We were just too focused on the discussion to notice.

 

Pixie Dust & The Mountain of Mediocrity by Hugh  Macleod

We’re always searching for that secret formula, that magic pixie dust to sprinkle over our products, services, books, causes, brands, blogs to bring them to life and make them Super Successful. Most marketing-related buzzwords gain traction by promising pixie dust results if applied to whatever it is we make, do, sell. “Add more Social!”. “Just need a Viral Video!” “It’s about the Storytelling!”. “Be Authentic!”

Have a nice week!