Currently viewing the tag: "Greg Satell"

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Networking for Survival by  Deborah Mills-Scofield

We think about networking as a very modern notion, with our accumulation of virtual “friends,” “followers,” and people-who-might-be-useful-to-us-someday. To me, it is just an extension of what my people, my family have been doing since 70 AD — making critical connections that enable both our survival. The tools may have changed, but our reliance on the network has not. In fact, without the network, I literally wouldn’t be alive.

 

Innovation is Impossible by Tim Kastelle

James Altucher recently suggested that “Eat All You Want of the Foods You Love and Still Lose Weight” would be a great book title – that no matter what was inside, it would sell. It’s easy to see why. Many of us like to eat all we want of the foods we love, and we also want to lose weight, so if we could do both at the same time, wouldn’t that be great?

                                                                                                                                                      To Know, but Not Understand: David Weinberger on Science and Big Data by  David Weinberger via Ralph Ohr

In an edited excerpt from his new book, Too Big to Know, David Weinberger explains how the massive amounts of data necessary to deal with complex phenomena exceed any single brain’s ability to grasp, yet networked science rolls on.

                                                                                                                                                         The Philosophy of Motivation by Greg Satell

Peter Drucker, the legendary management theorist, told us that we have to “accept the fact that we have to treat almost anybody as a volunteer.”

                                                                                                                                                        Why Organizational Innovation Is So Difficult by Joe Evans

In all ecosystems, organisms that evolve to survive the elements of their environments will likely continue their existence. Those that do not continue to evolve will most likely perish. Likewise, for business organizations to evolve, they must innovate their products, services, technologies, policies, processes and structures to capitalize on social, economic and industry trends within their environment. This is easier said than done.

                                                                                                                                                      How To (Not) Get Smart About Big Data by Wim Rampen

If you are to believe the talk of twitter-town and its suburbs, due to the connectivity of numerous devices worldwide, we (will) also have available so much data, it is just waiting to be mined and will change how we do, well..,  just about everything. All this is being referred to as Big Data. The problem with all this data of course is the filtering.

                                                                                                                                                    How Design Thinking Can Enrich Business and Marketing Innovation by  BEN WOOD, MARK WHITING & DAVID STOCKS

Design empowered innovation combines the best of right and left brain thinking. It has the capacity to deliver better ideas, with more relevance, realized earlier.

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Improving Your Idea Generating Skills… by  Paul Williams

A hunch is your creativity trying to tell you something” – Unknown

So where do you find yourself and what are you doing when you get a great idea…or any idea?

I’ll bet that you said something close to one of these:

Cultivating Innovation When The Future Is Unknowable by Joe Brewer via Ralph-Ohr

Sometimes what we think we know is more consequential than what we actually know.  As we nestled into our beds on the night of September 10th, 2001 most of us did not know that we would awaken to a terrorist attack that would unleash a decade of global unrest.

Before You Decide Vision Is Passé: 8 Reasons Why Vision Matters by Jesse Lyn Stoner

Have you ever been part of a team that magically came together? -where everyone thoroughly enjoyed being part of the team, worked together in synchronicity, and where you were really proud of what you accomplished?

The Rise of Shared Value by Arie Goldshlager

The JWT’s trendspotters recently included The Rise of Shared Value in their Top Ten trends for 2012:

Large Organizations and the Business Model Canvas by Paul Hobcraft

Recently I was having a ‘conversation’ with Alexander Osterwalder concerning the limited adoption of the Business Model Canvas within large organizations. I was asking him if he agreed and if he had any thoughts on this.

                                                                                                                                                 How permission to innovate leads to accidental innovation by Jorge Barba

Two weeks ago I wrote about the four signs that show that you have a culture of innovation. Well here’s another one:

A good sign that you’re innovating is when employees don’t ask for permission to do so. They just do it.

Use Your Value Proposition to Avoid Fatal Business Models by Tim Kastelle

What do you think of when you think of Swiss Watches?

You probably think of high-end brands, that have been making well-crafted watches for many years. Brands like Rolex, or Patek Philippe, or George Clooney and his Omega:

2012 – The Year of the Interface by Greg Satell

Besides his impressive array of trysts, Captain Kirk had very little on today’s average Joe. Personal communicators are now old hat, tricorders are right around the corner and even teleportation no longer seems completely out of reach.

Reinventing Collaboratively by Deborah Mills-Scofield

After co-creating on Business Model Generation with author Alex Osterwalder, I received an invitation from Steve Denning to review a book he was writing on transforming management (The Leader’s Guide to Radical Management).

Are You Standing Out Today? By Nilofer Merchant

People buy two categories of things.

The distinct. And the generic.

The distinct items are the things that have a limited commodity, that are artisan in nature, that are worth paying a premium for. They stand out for some reason. The generic items are, well, the things you find on Amazon.

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Customer Service in 2012 and Beyond Technology.. by Wim Rampen

Today’s post is triggered by Esteban Kolsky’s 2012 prediction for Customer Service markets. His predictions make sense, because Esteban is a good analyst that understands his job and takes it seriously. And since I do not understand a lot about the IT market, and frankly don’t want to, I advice you to trust Esteban’s views on that.

IDEO’s Steve Bishop on the Future of Sustainable Design Thinking by Rachel Signer

Steve Bishop is global lead of environmental impact at the design and business innovation firm IDEO. At IDEO, Bishop helps companies build brands, develop new products, and design new innovation processes inspired by principles of sustainability.

Ten Tensions in Innovation – Revised by Tim Kastelle

The single most important management skill to develop is a tolerance for ambiguity. Why? Because we often must manage objectives that are contradictory. For example, Firms that are successful at innovation are able to simultaneously come up with ideas that allow them to take advantage of what they’re really good at (exploitation) while also being able to search for novel new ideas (exploration).

Do Experts Slow Innovation? By Joseph F Coughlin via Ralph-Ohr

Innovation – everyone says they want it, but when it’s time to personally embrace it and change what they do everyday there is often reluctance, if not outright resistance.

 

Innovation in Psychology by Moses Ma

This blog is about innovation and invention of things, and I was recently provided an opportunity to glimpse into the creation of one of humanity’s greatest inventions – psychotherapy. A new film.

The New Psychology of Marketing by Greg Satell

Clearly, psychology and marketing are deeply related. What we buy is a function of how we think and what we think is a product of the way our minds work.

Are We Happy Yet? The Unexpected Links Between Happiness and Choice by Alice LaPlante via Riitta Raesmaa

The key to happiness lies in the choices you make, or so they say.

Yet, new research by long-time collaborators Jennifer Aaker, Cassie Mogilner, and Sep Kamvar suggests that people don’t make choices based on a single or shared notion of happiness.

What If You Changed and No One Noticed? By Jesse Lyn Stoner

Have you ever tried changing a behavior and no one noticed you were different? It’s not uncommon.

Jim was a “hands-on boss.” He had high standards and his team performed well. However, they depended on him for almost all decisions, and as a result he worked long hours and on weekends.

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Status Quophiles and Quophobes by Deborah Mills Scofield

Ever know anyone who will explicitly say he/she doesn’t think innovation is important? No! So listen carefully for the magic word – “but”.   Some of you know how much I love to challenge the status quo so here’s my theory: Status Quophiles see the glass as half empty and want to make sure it doesn’t become totally empty.  Status Quophobes are Innovators – they see the half empty glass as half full, waiting to be filled up!

Life’s What You Make It by Tim Kastelle

Well, we’re all getting older. What do you make of it? I ran across an interesting post by Ben Casnocha, which referenced an article by Benjamin Schwarz which includes this comment on John Updike:

The Pitfalls of Prediction by Greg Satell

Prognostication is a multi-billion dollar industry.  We have weathermen, Wall Street Analysts, political pundits and futurologists.  They all claim some expertise.

 

Hang Your Work in a Tree Tonight by Jesse Lyn Stoner

If you do what you love for a living, you’ll never work a day in your life. ~anonymous

An appealing thought, if it means living an integrated life.
However…there’s a big difference between living an integrated life and being consumed by work.

Creativity And Innovation In Small And Medium Size Firms by Idris Mootee

I am in Egypt this week and trying to finish three big Power Point decks, writing 6 documents and finished reading 63 documents with a slow Internet connection. And trying to finalize the editorial content for March 2012 issue of my magazine. It is not easy.

Collaboration Revs Results by Robyn McMaster

Bantering ideas back and forth triggered new insights for me and four other leaders around around the table.  Innovative possibilities spoken helped us see past familiar approaches to consider the experimental.  At times ideas were spoken so quickly it was hard to keep up!

Change will happen whether you like it or not by Jorge Barba

Companies are still scrambling with the rise of social networks like Twitter. If people think you suck they’ll gladly express themselves and let everyone else who listens to them. Oh and by the way, this happens in real-time.

8 Dangers of Collaboration by Nilofer Merchant

Most of what is written about collaboration is positive. Even hip. Collaboration is championed enthusiastically by the Enterprise 2.0 experts, as well as leading thinkers like Don Tapscott as the crucial approach for the 21st century.

Do Nice Guys Finish Last?  By Jonah Lehrer via Ralph-Ohr

In 1948, the legendary baseball manager Leo Durocher declared that “nice guys finish last.” Although Durocher would later deny the quote, his pithy line summarizes a popular and pessimistic take on human nature. When it comes to success, we assume that making it to the top requires ethical compromises.

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How To Find Your Passion by Bruce Upbin via Ralph-Ohr

What causes stress, both the personal kind (money woes, boss-hate, road-rage) and the societal kind (#OWS, congressional gridlock, volatile stock markets)? John Hagel has a theory about stress–and a solution.

11 Uncomfortable Facts About How IQ Affects Your Life by Kim Bhasin


We’d like to think that IQ isn’t the determining factor for success in life.

But psychology professors David Hambrick and Elizabeth Meinz recently wrote an Op-Ed for The New York Times, “Sorry Strivers, Talent Matters,” where they cite a few scientific studies that point to innate talent — not practice — as what separates the good from the great.

Complexity and User Experience by Jon Bolt

The best products don’t focus on features, they focus on clarity. Problems should be fixed through simple solutions, something you don’t have to configure, maintain, control. The perfect solution needs to be so simple and transparent you forget it’s even there.

 

People don’t buy what you do, people buy why you do it by Jorge Barba

Yesterday I went to TEDex TijuanaSalon at Cety’s University in Tijuana. While three of the four speakers talked about entrepreneurship, it was the speaker in a video from a previous TED that got the most applause. The people who organized the event apparently wanted to add more content and so decided to play Simon Sinek’s video for the audience.

The Truth About Strategy by Greg Satell

Over the years I’ve done a lot of things.  I’ve lived in a bunch of countries, run a number of businesses and even spent some years as an independent strategic consultant. Clients would come to me to solve their problems and, inevitably, they always traced them back to strategy.

The Unboxed Life: Giving by Jon Mertz

One side of our life needs to be boxed in, and another needs to be unboxed. Our unboxed life needs to be spirit-led, soul-inspired.

We hear words like “listen to your spirit” or “reach into your soul” and, at times, it just seems like a lot of nonsense. Yet, we know it when we feel it, and we know it when we hear it. Both come from within, soulful and spirited-minded.

 

The Innovating Power of Eight Words by Paul Hobcraft

Lately eight words have come up more often than not as the new imperative for business, not just for the start up but the more established business to measure themselves against. We live in ‘volatile’ times and they reflect what we have to constantly remind ourselves to do and they just are keeping me buzzing at present.

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Beyond the Social Network: Tips for Engaging Professional Relationships to Last a Lifetime by Gary Polsky

It used to be that you met someone at a meeting or a mixer, had a real conversation with them, perhaps saw them again at a luncheon, exchanged an email or phone conversation, and eventually, developed those initial interactions into a long-term business relationship.

Innovation and Social Leadership by Riitta Raesmaa

My brain is bubbling after the TEDxHelsinki event – a creatively built lineup of innovative speakers. The themes were exactly those I’ve been working on lately: Entrepreneurship, innovation, age & generations, and leadership. So here are random thoughts I’d like to share.

Lee Chipman: I Can Do Anything by Whitney Johnson

Lee Chipman is a busy mother of five girls. When she’s not baking, cleaning or helping with homework, she enjoys decorating her home.

 

Get Your Process Right to Innovate Successfully by Tim Kastelle

Ideally, you’ll have both. But I suspect that if it’s either/or, process wins.

There is an interesting example from the world of chess in Michael Nielsen’s fantastic new book Reinventing Discovery: The New Era of Networked Science. The book discusses how our improved ability to network via the internet is changing the face of science. It’s an interesting book, and also an important one and I recommend it highly.

Deconstructing the Design Thinker by Sohrab Vossoughi via Ralph-Ohr

The term ‘design thinking’ has lost some of its lustre of late, particularly in business publications. In my view, this is the natural result of throwing around a term with a bit too much enthusiasm and not enough understanding, and it is truly unfortunate, because the qualities it describes have never been more important.

 

The Future by Design by Greg Satell

The future has a nice ring to it.  It is fairly busting with promise.  We can let our dreams run wild, imagine that some of the bullshit we currently have to endure will subside and that cool new things will replace boring old ones.

 

Sketchnotes of Ezio Manzini at School of the Art Institute of Chicago by Craighton Berman

This past Monday evening, on an unseasonably warm night in Chicago, sustainability expert Ezio Manzini gave a thought-provoking lecture at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. Mr Manzini is a Professor of Industrial Design at Politecnico Milano, and is a renowned expert in the application of strategic design for sustainability.

Why We Cannot Perceive the World Objectively by Michael Michalko

People tend to think of perception as a passive process. We see, hear, smell, taste or feel stimuli that impinge upon our senses. We think that if we are at all objective, we record what is actually there.

 

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Sorry, Marketing’s 4P framework is not dead.. by Wim Rampen

Why Do B-Schools Still Teach The Famed 4P’s Of Marketing, When Three Are Dead?That was the question raised by Jens Martin Skibsted and Rasmus Bech Hansen and it received some good traction. Skibsted and Hansen argue that the only P of the four alive is Product.

4 Roles for Your Innovation Team by Tim Kastelle

Here’s a persistent innovation management question: is it better to have a dedicated team responsible for innovation, or should this responsibility be distributed throughout your entire organisation? The best answer depends on your circumstances. But if you set up a dedicated team, it’s important to consider what role you want them to play. There are four different roles that a dedicated innovation team can fill.

Reward insight or reward ideas? Both and… by Jorge Barba

This is a tricky question.

First of all, insights are different from ideas. Insights are more important than ideas. Breakthrough businesses are build on insights, not ideas. Ideas come after the insight. Yet in innovation circles we constantly hear that we should reward people for coming up with ideas. What about rewarding people for insights?

The Ultimate Code by Greg Satell

Digeratti are an unusual bunch.  Branded with distinctive facial hair configurations and fueled by caffeine, they run around coding, pitching, inventing and envisioning a bold new future.

GEN Z IN THE WORKPLACE – THOUGHTS AFTER #TCHAT by Pam Ross

There was a great discussion, and at times, debate, on #TChat last week, all about Generation Z and the workplace.  It feels like we just learned about Gen Y and how to engage them in the workplace, and it’s already time to prepare for Gen Z!

What Do Workplace Pit Bulls Do to Accountability? By Kate Nasser

Leaders, do you appoint someone the workplace pit bull believing it will make everyone more responsible and accountable? Let’s considerwhat workplace pit bulls do to accountability.

Two Collaborative Care Case Studies by Arie Goldshlager

The Collaborative Chronic Care Network (C3N) is certainly a very inspiring case of Collaborative Care Networks:

“Americans receive only 50% of recommended care and typically perform only about half of the “self-management” procedures and behaviors necessary to keep them healthy.

Explained: Why We Don’t Like Change by Heidi Grant Halvorson via Ralp-Ohr

Thinking about trying to shake things up at work? Brimming with new ideas and strategies? Hoping to get your organization to try a new way of doing things, or maybe just get your family to alter their holiday traditions a bit? Good for you.

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Can consumers discover what they want in products and services by designing them? By Arie Goldshlager

“It is in design that people find what they want. Furthermore, consumer involvement in product/service design almost always gets creative results.

 

How to Pay People by Dan Ariely

Most of the time, when you hire people you don’t want to specify exactly what they are to do and how much they would get paid—you don’t want to say if you do X you will get this much, and if you do Y you will get that much.

 

What is Intelligence? By Greg Satell

We know intelligence when we see it.  Witty repartee at a cocktail party. Outstanding results on standardized tests.  Winning the big prize on a quiz show.

 

The T-Model and Strategies for Hiring IA Practitioners: Part 1 by Nathaniel Davis

In 2004, UX design professional Peter Boersma suggested that information architecture was one of the many disciplines that come together to shape the multidisciplinary practice of user experience design for the Web.

Making the Most of Analogies by Peter Lloyd via Ralph-Ohr

It has happened to me. I know it has happened to you. You’re making a point in a political, philosophical, or personal argument. A brilliant analogy pops into your head and you use it, confident you will make your point.

Clay Shirky Says Good Collaboration is Structured Fighting by

Joe Brockmeier

Companies and projects focusing on large-scale collaboration might want to start thinking about collaboration in a new way. Clay Shirky, author of  Here Comes Everybody closed out the second day ofLinuxCon North America 2011 with a contrarian look at collaboration. While many treat collaboration as a “love fest” or harmonious interaction, Shirky put forward the idea that productive methods of fighting are the most successful, particularly in open source.

3 Fascinating Facts About Our Brilliant Brains by Margarita Tarrakovsky

Our brains do a lot of work behind the scenes to help us function and thrive. But we largely know this already.

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What is Intelligence? By Greg Sattel

We know intelligence when we see it.  Witty repartee at a cocktail party. Outstanding results on standardized tests.  Winning the big prize on a quiz show.

 

Why Most Meetings Suck by Ellen Weber

When Tom Hansen said most meetings suck, he hit on a rampant waste of human talent today.

That problem begs the question: How do you engage talents, considering that:

 

Innovation When All You Have is a Noodle by Tim Kastelle

Most of the inspirational innovation stories that we hear are about technology firms like Google, Amazon and Apple. This sometimes makes it difficult to help people find the connections to their work if they are in less sexy industries, like mining, education or government.

 

Diagnose and Cure Team Drift by  Jesse Lyn Stoner

One of the most common complaints I hear from managers is, “I want to re-energize our team. We used to be cohesive and enjoy working together.

 

The Science of Irrationality by Jonah Lehrer via Ralph Ohr

Here’s a simple arithmetic question: “A bat and ball cost $1.10. The bat costs $1 more than the ball. How much does the ball cost?”

                                                                                                                                                     Innovation’s Natural Force by Deborah Mills-Scofield

A few weeks ago, I was driving by an abandoned Ford plant in Lorain, OH.   The plant, a key regional employer closed in 2005.  What struck me were the parking lots.  Some of them had become fields!

                                                                                                                                                     

Is innovation really going to save the economy? By Jorge Barba

First of all, I’m not even sure what we want out of innovation. If we take what we see out there as a signal, then we sure aren’t innovating anything.

 

Creativity in Business: My Interview with Bill Smith, PhD by Michelle James

Interview # 31 in our Creativity in Business Thought Leader Series is with 
Bill Smith, PhD, President of  ODII. Bill is an innovative thinker and practitioner in the field of leadership, organization and social development.

 

Service Design: The Most Important Term You Haven’t Heard Of by Darren Weiss

James Rock, the managing director and chief business designer for Cultivar Consulting Limited, a business and services design consultancy, talks about service design, its benefits and why it’s important for your business.

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The Finnish Awesomeness and Entrepreneurship by Riitta Raesmaa

Something exceptional is happening here in Finland. However I think that the foundation for that has existed a long time, only to wait its time to come. And it seems that the time is here and now. Let me explain.

Who’s Next – A spotlight on innovative thinkers who are changing the future of business. FastCompany via Ralph-Ohr

We’re helping people make decisions faster and in a better way,” says Christy Liu, cofounder and director of marketing at Wanderfly. “We’re also getting people to travel more. The whole idea of the site is about inspriation, so what we hope to do and what we are already doing is is getting people sort of off their bums and traveling the world.

The Customer Is Always Wrong by Wim Rampen

I think the Customer is wrong many more times than she’s right..

Customers don’t fill out (online) forms like they should, they don’t read the terms and conditions when they buy, they are wrong about what they thought they read (somewhere), about how to use your product and how to maintain it..

 

Co-Creating Business Models by Deborah Mills-Scofield

In 2009,  I was privileged to co-create an awesome book, Business Model Generation, with Alex Osterwalder and Yves Pigneur.     Co-creating the book with Alex was an amazing experience, created some lasting friendships with other co-creators, and of course Alex.  After Angela Dunn‘s monthly twitter-chat, #ideachat, I decided to ask Alex what made him decide to do co-create this book:

Your Customers’ Big Irritation is a Big Opportunity by Arie Goldshlager

I found this Don Sull  “top 10” field guide to clues for hidden breakthrough opportunities article packed full of instructive observations. Please note particularly:

 

Let’s Be A Little More Creative About Creativity. And What Does Collective Creativiry Means? By Idris Mootee

Scholarly interest in creativity ranges widely: Topics to which it is relevant include the relationship between creativity and general intelligence; the mental and neurological processes associated with creative activity; the relationship between personality type and creative ability; the relationship between creativity and mental health;

The Fat File by Patti Blackstaffe

Do you keep a file that holds all of the awards, recognition and comments made to you about your performance?  I do.  I keep everything written about my performance by the companies for whom I have worked in addition to the customers and clients I have served and I call it my Fat File.

How to Perform Under Pressure by Greg Satell

Okay, it’s your big day.  Everything is on the line.  All of your blood and sweat has led up to this point and now it really matters.  What happens next is up to you.

Have a nice week!