Currently viewing the tag: "Ellen Weber"

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What is Intelligence? By Greg Sattel

We know intelligence when we see it.  Witty repartee at a cocktail party. Outstanding results on standardized tests.  Winning the big prize on a quiz show.

 

Why Most Meetings Suck by Ellen Weber

When Tom Hansen said most meetings suck, he hit on a rampant waste of human talent today.

That problem begs the question: How do you engage talents, considering that:

 

Innovation When All You Have is a Noodle by Tim Kastelle

Most of the inspirational innovation stories that we hear are about technology firms like Google, Amazon and Apple. This sometimes makes it difficult to help people find the connections to their work if they are in less sexy industries, like mining, education or government.

 

Diagnose and Cure Team Drift by  Jesse Lyn Stoner

One of the most common complaints I hear from managers is, “I want to re-energize our team. We used to be cohesive and enjoy working together.

 

The Science of Irrationality by Jonah Lehrer via Ralph Ohr

Here’s a simple arithmetic question: “A bat and ball cost $1.10. The bat costs $1 more than the ball. How much does the ball cost?”

                                                                                                                                                     Innovation’s Natural Force by Deborah Mills-Scofield

A few weeks ago, I was driving by an abandoned Ford plant in Lorain, OH.   The plant, a key regional employer closed in 2005.  What struck me were the parking lots.  Some of them had become fields!

                                                                                                                                                     

Is innovation really going to save the economy? By Jorge Barba

First of all, I’m not even sure what we want out of innovation. If we take what we see out there as a signal, then we sure aren’t innovating anything.

 

Creativity in Business: My Interview with Bill Smith, PhD by Michelle James

Interview # 31 in our Creativity in Business Thought Leader Series is with 
Bill Smith, PhD, President of  ODII. Bill is an innovative thinker and practitioner in the field of leadership, organization and social development.

 

Service Design: The Most Important Term You Haven’t Heard Of by Darren Weiss

James Rock, the managing director and chief business designer for Cultivar Consulting Limited, a business and services design consultancy, talks about service design, its benefits and why it’s important for your business.

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The Crisis of Meaning in the Millennial Workforce by Megan Erickson

What’s the Big Idea?

For all the talk of trailblazing, the most successful businesses of the 20th century made it to the top by maintaining an edge in the same singular pursuit: maximizing shareholder value.

The Marvels and the Flaws of Intuitive Thinking by Daniel Kahneman via Ralph Ohr

“The power of settings, the power of priming, and the power of unconscious thinking, all of those are a major change in psychology. I can’t think of a bigger change in my lifetime. You were asking what’s exciting? That’s exciting, to me.”

Can mastery and innovation coexist? By Jorge Barba

Jonathan Fields posted this question in a Psychology Today article last week. Here is my answer and would love to hear yours.

It’s a great question and not at all difficult to answer, though it’s better said than done. First of all, mastery is never achieved. It’s a goal, but a goal we’ll never reach.

The Finnish Awesomeness and Entrepreneurship by Riitta Raesmaa

Something exceptional is happening here in Finland. However I think that the foundation for that has existed a long time, only to wait its time to come. And it seems that the time is here and now. Let me explain.

 

IDEO: Big Innovation Lives Right on the Edge of Ridiculous Ideas by Jake Cook

Imagine for a second if you could somehow wrap up the creative chaos of a kindergartner’s life and apply it at work. You’d go on field trips, make stuff, hatch crazy ideas, and be awed by the world on a daily basis. Sound ridiculous? At the renowned international design consultancy IDEO, it’s how work gets done every day.

 

Co-Creating Business Models by Deborah Mills-Scofield

In 2009,  I was privileged to co-create an awesome book, Business Model Generation, with Alex Osterwalder and Yves Pigneur.     Co-creating the book with Alex was an amazing experience, created some lasting friendships with other co-creators, and of course Alex.  After Angela Dunn‘s monthly twitter-chat, #ideachat, I decided to ask Alex what made him decide to do co-create this book:

The 10 Most Important Trends in Business by Haydn Shaughnessy

What is the single most important trend in business today? If there was a beauty contest or an arm wrestle to decide, then the big surprise would be the sheer number of contestants.

5 Things You Need To Know About (Social) CRM (Definitions) by Wim Rampen

I think trying to define something is a very good exercise to understand what you are dealing with or what you are trying to do it for. It also helps to communicate internally. And regardless of what many say, I don’t think there are enough definitions of (Social) CRM, at least not good ones.. But that is a personal opinion, not relevant to today’s post.

Building a Better Business by Design by RAYLENE KNUTSON

Are you a business that wants to innovate? Think like a designer. That’s the message from a growing number of consultants, business leaders, policy makers and educators who think companies need to swap obsessive analytics for more right-brain experimentation.

When Working Memory Kicks In by Ellen Weber

Unless looking for lost golf balls, that hold up games –  stay with a thing until you find it. The brain’s working memory kicks in to land life-changing dreams, when you GO FOR IT. On the flip side of waiting for windfalls – winners run with What if … possibilities – and working memory lands new deals.

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Good Ideas and Great Ideas by Greg Satell

The world is full of ideas, but very few good ones. As an old saying goes, “ideas are like assholes, everybody’s got one and they’re usually full of shit.” They are, however, important.

 

Two Footed Questions Fuse Arts and Science by Ellen Weber

Two-footed questions drive curiosity and they can  convert even ordinary minds, into expert problem solvers?

 

The Role of Relaxation in Consumer Behavior by ScienceDaily via Ralph Ohr

This phenomenon is demonstrated in six experiments involving two different methods of inducing relaxation, a large number of products of different types, and various methods of assessing monetary valuation.

 

Vision: How It’s Created Is As Important As What It Says by Jesse Lyn Stoner

If you want to create a vision that engages the hearts and spirits of everyone in your organization, remember what’s important is not only “what it says” but also how it’s created.

 

Little Innovations Matter! By John Steen

What’s better…. a lot of little innovations or one big innovation? If we had to choose, would it better to have an economy made up of a lot of firms trying to make small improvements to their business or do we want a game-changer like Apple or Google?

 

Management by Imagination by Roger Martin

The perception that good management is closely linked to good measurement runs deep. How often do you hear these old saws repeated: “If you can’t measure it, it doesn’t count”;

 

Strategic Innovation And The Quest For Breakthrough Ideas by Idris Mootee

Innovation is now a very hot topic at the C-Suites. I have speaking a lot on the subject the last 5 years. The funny part is I am talking about Strategic Innovation and many still talk about Technology Innovation as if it was the sole source of innovation.

 

A Talk On Fast Innovation, All In One Great Picture by Bob Sutton

A couple weeks ago, I did a talk on “fast innovation” at IDEO.  I gave the talk from a powerpoint deck, but at the same time, while the audience and I discussed the talk, there was a guy named Kevin Bain who does this thing called
“graphics scribing.”

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What’s Your Platform for Value Co-Creation? By  Graham Hill

A couple of years back I wrote a speculative blog post at CustomerThink entitled How Customer Co-Creation is the Future of Business. In many ways my prediction was right, Customer Co-Creation IS the future of business, but not exactly in the way I had imagined.

 

Two Footed Questions Fuse Arts and Science by Ellen Weber

Two-footed questions drive curiosity and they can convert even ordinary minds, into expert problem solvers?

Marketing, Science and Pseudoscience by Greg Satell

“Science” is a word that gets thrown around a lot.  We hear that “scientists say” so and so and then hear later that other scientists say something totally different.

 

More Mental Oomph though Others! By Robyn McMaster

Just go down diagonally…

 

Come On Over by Nilofer Merchant

First, I would spend a month or two in a frenzy of painting, and buying new furnishings that I wanted to arrive immediately, hanging art up in just the perfect spot, updating floorboards, changing out light fixtures and, well, obsessing to make the place “homey”.

 

Why Creative People Are Rarely Seen as Leaders by Susan Cain via Ralph Ohr

We are in love with the word “Eureka,” and for good reason.  Creativity is magic: the ability to create something out of nothing, to make connections that others don’t see.

 

Strategic Innovation And The Quest For Breakthrough Ideas by Idris Mootee

Innovation is now a very hot topic at the C-Suites. I have speaking a lot on the subject the last 5 years. The funny part is I am talking about Strategic Innovation and many still talk about Technology Innovation as if it was the sole source of innovation.

 

A step backward by Tim Brown
The UK has long had an impressive track record of producing successful designers and engineers. Many credit that success to a focus on design within the education system. Significant investments were made in the second half of the 20th Century on design and engineering programs at the University level but more importantly for the last 20 years design and technology has been mandated as part of the core curriculum in high schools.

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How Open Innovation & Modularity Accelerate Innovation at PsionTeklogix by Andrea Meyer via @ralph_ohr

Point: Use open innovation and modularity to identify new product/service needs and accelerate your pace of innovation

 

Don’t look for examples, be the example by Jorge Barba

I have a client who has (so far) the only SaaS payroll management solution for small businesses in Mexico. This is both great and bad. Let me explain…

In our initial meeting I was told they used Workday as an example to follow. Their reasoning was that Workday has a very simple to use and intuitive interface, plus they are the ‘leaders’ in the field. The studied them rigorously and brought the same principles over to their solution.

 

The No. 1 Reason Companies Don’t Innovate by Deborah Mills Scofield

This saga of Congress, the White House and the budget is horrendous.  If they can’t agree on 1% of the budget for six months, can they really create a budget to cut the deficit and debt for a year?

You Have the Power to Choose Prosperity by Umair Haque

Our forebears struggled, toiled, fought, and sweated for generations to create a future better, wealthier, stronger than their own. The gifts they handed down — democracy, markets, justice, opportunity, reason, equality, liberty — are the fundamental institutions — the building blocks — of enduring, authentic prosperity.

What Do You Do with Criticism? By Robyn McMaster

 

During a state conference, when I began working with Ellen Weber, someone asked a question that I perceived totally “put down” brain research. Ever experience that?

 

Father as leader by John Maeda

I have regular open office hours for students, staff, and faculty — a practice that is often suggested for college presidents and for other leaders — the so-called “open door” philosophy. You learn all kinds of things about your organization when you do so.

 

Taking it home, part 2: passion, permission and prototyping by

Tom Maiorana via @ariegoldshlager

We just wrapped up a Design Thinking Bootcamp with 37 executives from around the globe. A few came from start-ups, others from large corporations. We even had a few folks from governmental agencies. Despite the difference in organizational backgrounds, one thing was on almost all of our participants’ minds: “How do we make design thinking work back home?”

 

What’s Political about Human Brains? By Ellen Weber

Have you ever wondered how political leaders’ brains work for or against ethics, reason and emotion?

News of political infighting, stalemates, accusations and posturing flood us daily.  We watch  opportunities for greatness fade, when political leaders  fail to grow emotional and rational skills to achieve what they campaigned for. But do you know why  brain operations differ between ethical and self-serving  public leaders?

 

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THE DARK SIDE OF BEST PRACTICES by Michael Wade via @ariegoldshlager

How can you possibly argue with best practices? These practices are, more often than not, superior to your own. Indeed, best practices embody how the best firms within an industry conduct business. By adopting them, you can share in that success. So, if they are better than what you currently have, and they are proven to be effective in your industry, then why not make the switch?

 

The Power of Synthesis and the Problem with Experts by Greg Sattel

How much do we need specialized experts for the information economy?

If history is any guide, probably not much.  It makes little sense for capable people to spend an entire career doing the same job when they would probably be much more effective if they gained experience in more than one area.

 

Are you Benevolent Dictator or BrainPowered Facilitator? By Ellen Weber

10 Key differences between…Leader traits.

 

The Rotman Design Challenge: A Review by Helen Walters

In recent years, calls for a more creative or innovative approach to, well, pretty much everything but our financial instruments, have become more pointed. As the western economy in particular has evolved away from its industrial roots and as the Internet has wrought digital havoc on the old, understood ways of doing things, so have many accepted that the education of those who will effectively lead progress toward a healthy, sustainable future must also shift — and fast.

 

Insultants not Consultants: Balancing Mastery and Questioning by Jorge Barba

Though people/clients see me as a Consultant, I’ve never really liked the label of Consultant and don’t really consider myself one because I don’t specialize. I’m more of an ‘Insultant in Residence’, not a Consultant.

 

Get in touch with your Inner Jester to have a more joyful life by Teresa Van Lanen

Here I am just recently flying a kite on the beach and laughing. Having fun and laughing on vacation is not too hard to do for most of us. But at times finding our inner jester can be difficult. With April fools day upon us I felt this topic would make a great article, enjoy!

 

Four Roadblocks for a Corporate Network Culture by Stefan Lindegaard

In working with companies that are trying to build a networking culture, here are some reasons I’ve identified for why such efforts can fail or not reach the hoped-for degree of success.

 

The art of innovation by Kate Oakley, Brooke Sperry and Andy Pratt via @ralph_ohr

In the 21st century, the UK’s economic competitiveness and social wellbeing will increasingly depend on our ability to innovate. A significant part of the innovation process revolves around ‘creativity’ – the ability to generate new ideas, or to restructure and redeploy old ones.

 

When Customer Rebellion Becomes Open Revolution by Umair Haque

What if your business isn’t just fundamentally ill-equipped to survive and thrive in the 21st century — but is actually unequipped for it?

 

Art and design in service of our world by John Maeda

I’m on a video call with the World Economic Forum Global Agenda Councils that links together experts across the world in response to global challenges. The topic of our call is centering around the situation in Japan. Prof. Toshiko Mori of Harvard shared how there is a gallery in Tokyo that is informing citizens, using art and design, as to how one-third of the electricity in Tokyo utilizes the failed nuclear powered plants — and the importance of saving energy right now in Tokyo.

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12 Sparks for Heads-Up Creativity by Robyn McMaster

Do you find your creativity at a lull and needing a jolt at times?  For extra spark, gain insights from leaders and designers to jump-start your creativity.  Consider the following:

 

Three Steps for Inventing the Future by Tim Kastelle

That’s the idea that framed yesterday’s post – Where’s My Flying Car? I argued that as innovators, our job is to invent the future – and that in doing so, instead of trying to come up with something that has never existed before, like a flying car, we’re better off trying to figure out how things that already exist can be redesigned so that they mean something completely new.

 

Why I’m Glad I Got Fired by Nilofer Merchant via @timkastelle and @ralph_ohr

I came to be an expert on collaboration because Carol Bartz both hired me and fired me — within 18 months. Here’s what happened.

 

Creativity – Risk or Regret? By Ellen Weber

If you agree with Sir Ken Robinson that creativity gets clobbered at school, you’ll likely also agree it takes risk to create and lead a finer future.

 

Making creative connections: What matters is that you make them by Jorge Barba

While there are a lot of organizations that aggregate trends (see Trend Hunter and Trend Watching to name a few), people often ask me how believable those trends are and if they should be arriving at the same conclusions while doing their own trend hunting.

 

Game Mechanics and Landscape Design for Customer Value Creation by  Riitta Raesmaa

I recently met a marketing professional who had seen the “social light”, or should I say Social Business Light. He was stressed about the fact that most of his colleagues and the management “don’t understand the value of social media and what is happening within marketing communication”. Very familiar set up!

 

The Power of Observing and Talking to Real Humans by Bob Sutton

Although Good Boss, Bad Boss focuses more squarely on the relationship between bosses and their immediate charges, one of the main themes of the book — following a design-thinking view of the world — is that the best bosses go to great lengths to develop empathy for both the people they lead and the customers served by their teams and organizations. 

 

“Build to Fail” And “Fail To Build” Can Have Different Meanings. To Fail Is Part Of To Build. To Fail Is To Hep To Build To Last. I Hope I’m Not Confusing You. By Idris Mootee

In London this week, fully packed with meetings. Staying at St. Marins Lane and it is one of my favourite hotels in London. Both for style and location even I am not the saturday night crowd that hangs out in the cocktail lounge. I am getting a lot of work done writing and editing for the next issue of M/I/S/C. Deadline is a few days away.

 

Innovation – Matching Needs and Solutions by Ralph Ohr

While revisiting some collected innovation readings, I recognized that it might be important to briefly emphasize again one “fundamental”: the distinction between needs and solutions.

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The Art of the Dumb Question by Deb Mills-Scofield

When I was a child, my parents always answered a question with an answer that led to another question.  So early on, I learned to just keep asking questions.  It drove my teachers nuts (don’t get me started on education!) and drives my husband nuts (like that’s the only reason!).  Just to bug my husband further,  I’ve taught our kids to do the same thing!  Despite this annoying habit, it’s served me pretty well in my career, learning a lot (much of which I can’t remember) along the way.

 

Spur your Personal Growth with Creative Guidance by Teresa van Lanen

I once heard that all the answers and support are right in front of us, clearing the mind and opening the spirit will get us there. It’s kind of like when you can’t find your car keys or the one sock that matches the other in your hand and no matter how hard you try to retrace your steps and dig through the drawer, you cannot find it

 

Tapping for Emotional Freedom by Kat Tansey

I’ve been fooling around with the Emotional Freedom Technique (EFT), or “Tapping” as it is being called by more and more people, for several years.

 

Small Things Are Big by Becky Robinson

We’ve had a lot of new visitors to Weaving Influence over the past few days.

Can I tell you I love that?

We’ve also had a lot of conversation from visitors who have commented for the first time. Thank you.

 

Dinosaur Communications Hold You Back? By Ellen Weber

Dinosaur communication departments impede innovation, much like spiked speed bumps obstruct an Indianapolis 500 race.

 

Maker, fixer, tinkerer, techie, hacker, inventor, whiz by Clare O’neill

Recognise yourself in the title?  You are legion…

In a fascinating survey, researchers at MIT have shown that UK consumers spend more on product development than the whole of UK industry does. 

 

Pollen’s Love Released in France!…Oh la la! By Marion Chapsal

Last saturday, at the cinema,  as I was waiting in a joyful excitement for The King’s Speech to start, I came across an amazingly surprising and beautiful trailer.

 

Could it be time for a change? By Robyn McMaster

If you went down the hall and peered inside Bologna’s standard 11th Century lecture room, you wouldn’t feel as if you were in a museum.  You would feel at home.  John Medina in Brain Rules Minus mikes and PowerPoints, what’s the difference?

 

Change Management by Lubaia

How do you manage changes in your project?

The change is one of the most difficult things to deal with during a project. There are many reasons for this, you don’t have extra resources, the project timeline can not change, the budget is short, etc.

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What is the Customer’s Role in Breakthrough Innovation?

by Ralph Ohr

There has been quite a lot of discussion recently about a post by Jens Martin Skibsted and Rasmus Bech Hansen, titled “User-Led Innovation Can’t Create Breakthroughs; Just Ask Apple and Ikea”. Their major claim is: “Great brands lead users, not the other way around.”

 

With The Emerging Of The New “Object-Culture” – Meanings Are Sought Through Social Identities, Visual Information and Interfaces / Interactions by Idris Mootee

There are objects that I love for many different reasons. They range from my Leicas to my JBL speakers, LV bags, Prada shoes and Mac computers.

 

For Innovation, Best Practice is a Verb not a Noun! By Deb Mills-Scofield

One of the central tenets of 20th Century business has been ‘best practices’.   Let’s dissect this veritable oxymoron:

  • Best: highest quality, standing (at a point in time, place and context)
  • Practice: a habit or custom (noun) or to do repeatedly to acquire proficiency

 

Follow-up on Destroying Customer Value: @Telfort is listening.. by Wim Rampen

Last week’s post Destroying Customer Value was in it’s essence not about getting attention from the Telco company involved (being Telfort).

 

Reviewing “A New Culture of Learning” by John Hagel

We all have the uncomfortable feeling that the education we received is serving us less and less well. The reassuring notion that the concentrated dose of education in our younger years would serve us well for the rest of lives appears increasingly suspect.

 

Dinosaur Communications Hold You Back? By Ellen Weber

Dinosaur communication departments impede innovation, much like spiked speed bumps obstruct an Indianapolis 500 race.

 

Design renews its relationship with science by Tim Brown

I have noticed a growing conversation recently concerning the relationship between design and science.

 

New Research: We Are More Creative When We Help Others Than Ourselves by Bob Sutton

There is an interesting set of findings from psychological experiments that suggest we see others’ flaws and strengths more clearly than our own (I wrote about this in Good Boss, Bad Boss) and that, on average, human-beings make more rational decisions when make them for others rather than themselves.

 

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Redesigned Thinking for Diverse Brains! by Ellen Weber 

Why does design thinking exclude diversity at work, when it could include more brainpower for innovative renewal? Design thinking, according to Dr. Roger Martin – Dean of Rotman School of Management – in a recent HSM online seminar,  calls upon two ways of thinking.

 

All Life is an Experiment by Tim Kastelle

Uncertainty is one thing that makes a lot of people uncomfortable. Unfortunately, in most business situations, uncertainty is a fact of life.

Graham Hill made an interesting response to my post yesterday about simplistic, complex and simple models. He said:

The real world is complex . Most businesses simplify the complexity to ‘manage’ it. Complex is too hard!

 

Social Wolf in Sheep’s Clothing, ready for the Social Business? By Riitta Raesmaa

I recently found my old thesis, and yes, some of its topics and content are (still) relevant, as this one: the evolution of organization and work structures. The very same topic Esko Kilpi is researching. The discussion in my old thesis and Esko’s blog posts inspire me to learn more about this topic.

 

“Have Some Sugar” and Six Other Ways to Be Good: Evidence from BPS Research by Bob Sutton

One of the my favorite blogs on the planet is BPS Research,  where folks from the British Psychological Society summarize the latest psychological research — and do so with delightful charm and accuracy.  I was just visiting (it is a great place to look around) and, as part of just one post, they offer “7 Ways to Be Good.”

 

Find the revolution in constraints by Jorge Barba

Before I fell in love with technology my intent was to become an architect. Because of this I have an acute sensitivity with architects, so when I heard about the ideas of Bjarke Ingels a few years ago I was blown away.

 

Managing the Hype Cycle by Greg Sattel

Should you believe the hype?

Hype, much like the proverbial soldier’s girlfriend, doesn’t exactly lie, but doesn’t tell the whole truth either.  We’re told our whole world will change, lots of journalists and investment bankers drive expectations further and then we are inevitably disappointed.  Only later, we find that, after all, there really was something to it all along.

 

Dan Ariely on irrationality in the workplace McKinsey Quarterly  Via  @ralph_ohr

The behavioral economist explains why executives need to recognize—and embrace—the irrational forces that affect themselves and their employees.

 

The unbearable lightness of design thinking by Guido Stompff

My latest blog: the unbearable lightness of designthinking. It considers 4 contesting paradigms / woldviews on innovation, based on a famous model of Daft and Weick (1984). These paradigms can be explained alongside two axes:

 

Brain Surgery, Corporate Culture & Leadership Consistency by Alicia Arenas

The anticipation, wondering if it was benign or cancerous (it was benign), praying that the neurosurgeon would not suddenly get the shakes, being in a hospital away from home and having no family nearby all added up to make this one of the most stressful experiences I’ve gone through in a long time.

 

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