Currently viewing the tag: "Deb Mills-Scofield"

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You Get Better at What You Do by Tim Kastelle 

If you want to get better at innovation, you have start innovating more.

That probably sounds obvious, but in practice, not all that many people do it.

I was reminded of this by an interesting post by John Gruber discussing Apple’s transition to cloud computing. It includes this section:

 

10 Divergent Strategies – Break through the Box! By Robyn McMaster

Why is it that creative people tend to break rules? Innovators imagine something that will work better. They don’t like being boxed in, but somehow have a glint in their eyes for the adventure of a challenge. Is that where you see yourself?

 

Why Trends Are For Suckers by Greg Satell

It feels good to be trendy.  You can be sure that you’ll have a lot of company.  And that’s exactly the problem.  It’s easy to go wrong when everybody around you thinks it’s right.

 

Paradox of Innovation & Intellectual Property by Deb Mills-Scofield

Yesterday was the 3rd Open Innovation Summit at BW‘s Center for Innovation & Growth: Practical Challenges of Global Open Innovation featuring P&G.  Too much happened for one post so I’m going to do one on each panelist’s story and discussion, starting with Kelly McDow, Associate General Counsel for P&G’s Connect+Develop.

 

A Cool Neurological Explaination for the Power of Small Wins by Bob Sutton

Regular readers of this blog know that I am a huge fan of the power of small wins, and following Karl Weick’s classic article, have argued in Good Boss, Bad Boss and here at HBR that big hairy goals cause people to freak-out and freeze-up if they aren’t broken down into smaller stepping stones.

 

Seven Steps To Better Brainstorming. Or May Be There Are More. Is Brainstorming The Right Word? By Idris Mootee

Let’s start with this…this is not the best title. I really don’t like the word “brainstorming.” It means a group of people getting together to generate a lot of deas for the solution of a problem.

 

Why Right Brainers Will Rule The Future By Diane Jacobsen

Traditional business thinking has generally followed a linear, compartmentalized process that molded the sum of its various known parts into a logical, pragmatic solution. This process was born primary out of the dawn of manufacturing, which attenuated the sequenced progression, and didn’t allow for continuous discovery, collaboration, rapid prototyping, or integrated thinking.

 

We Have Designed, We Build, You Will Runby by Thierry de Baillon

However we want to call it, Enterprise 2.0, social business or collaborative whatsitsname, what we are watching now is a vendors-claimed increasing evolution toward maturity of leading platforms. During its last symposium, the Gartner Group held a session entitled “Managing Social Software Maturity: Supporting Pioneers and Settlers“, and is predicting a near-billion figure for the social software market in 2011.

 

The Cycle of Innovation (Closing Thoughts) by Paul Williams via Ralph Ohr

Hopefully our step-by-step review of the Continuous Innovation Loop has been helpful.  I wanted to use a separate blog entry to focus on how the individual steps link together.

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How Open Innovation & Modularity Accelerate Innovation at PsionTeklogix by Andrea Meyer via @ralph_ohr

Point: Use open innovation and modularity to identify new product/service needs and accelerate your pace of innovation

 

Don’t look for examples, be the example by Jorge Barba

I have a client who has (so far) the only SaaS payroll management solution for small businesses in Mexico. This is both great and bad. Let me explain…

In our initial meeting I was told they used Workday as an example to follow. Their reasoning was that Workday has a very simple to use and intuitive interface, plus they are the ‘leaders’ in the field. The studied them rigorously and brought the same principles over to their solution.

 

The No. 1 Reason Companies Don’t Innovate by Deborah Mills Scofield

This saga of Congress, the White House and the budget is horrendous.  If they can’t agree on 1% of the budget for six months, can they really create a budget to cut the deficit and debt for a year?

You Have the Power to Choose Prosperity by Umair Haque

Our forebears struggled, toiled, fought, and sweated for generations to create a future better, wealthier, stronger than their own. The gifts they handed down — democracy, markets, justice, opportunity, reason, equality, liberty — are the fundamental institutions — the building blocks — of enduring, authentic prosperity.

What Do You Do with Criticism? By Robyn McMaster

 

During a state conference, when I began working with Ellen Weber, someone asked a question that I perceived totally “put down” brain research. Ever experience that?

 

Father as leader by John Maeda

I have regular open office hours for students, staff, and faculty — a practice that is often suggested for college presidents and for other leaders — the so-called “open door” philosophy. You learn all kinds of things about your organization when you do so.

 

Taking it home, part 2: passion, permission and prototyping by

Tom Maiorana via @ariegoldshlager

We just wrapped up a Design Thinking Bootcamp with 37 executives from around the globe. A few came from start-ups, others from large corporations. We even had a few folks from governmental agencies. Despite the difference in organizational backgrounds, one thing was on almost all of our participants’ minds: “How do we make design thinking work back home?”

 

What’s Political about Human Brains? By Ellen Weber

Have you ever wondered how political leaders’ brains work for or against ethics, reason and emotion?

News of political infighting, stalemates, accusations and posturing flood us daily.  We watch  opportunities for greatness fade, when political leaders  fail to grow emotional and rational skills to achieve what they campaigned for. But do you know why  brain operations differ between ethical and self-serving  public leaders?

 

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Das perguntas tolas à empatia.

 

Deb Mills-Scofield escreveu um artigo extraordinário “A arte de fazer perguntas idiotas” onde se pode ler:

“Isso leva-me a propor que a transformação do 20 º século para a 21º seja a Era de Respostas para a Era das perguntas.   Embora as respostas sejam importantes, é mais importante saber que perguntas fazer para chegar às respostas.   A falta de interrogatório é parte do que nos levou a bagunça dos últimos três anos (ou mais).   Aprendemos perguntando e usando esse conhecimento para fazer mais perguntas e diferentes. É por isso que eu espero que o 21 º C aperfeiçoe a arte da pergunta idiota.”

Proposta aceite!

É imperativo que comecemos a pensar seriamente, que partes de nós determinam o futuro da nossa vida e dos nossos ecossistemas ou do nosso mundo, e eu só posso fazer isso fazendo perguntas, muitas, diferentes e mesmo tolas.

Há algum tempo escrevi um artigo “Pense na forma como pensa e as coisas mudarão” onde foco a necessidade de estar preparado para repensar como fazemos as coisas.

Agora pense em fazer perguntas em vez de dar respostas. O mundo está em constante mudança.

Porque é que eu faço o tipo de perguntas que faço?

“Porque perguntas idiotas desafiam o status quo.   Perguntas idiotas testam o básico, os pressupostos tácitos.   Perguntas idiotas fazem- nos parar e pensar sobre as verdades fundamentais.  Perguntas idiotas chegar ao núcleo” – Deb Mills!

Às vezes a forma como pensamos é boa e outras vezes não é! Como e quando é que sabemos a diferença?

As pessoas são habitualmente egoístas e talvez por essa razão não utilizem o pensamento crítico para compreender até que ponto as perguntas que fazem as leva a pensar sobre a “verdade”.

O pensamento crítico é a capacidade de compreender um sistema ou uma declaração e de lhe responder.

Parece ser um facto alargado a muita gente que a nossa capacidade de utilizar o pensamento crítico foi condicionada ao longo da nossa vida e particularmente nas escolas superiores. É preciso parar para pensar e compreender as coisas, as relações, as pessoas e encontrar soluções inovadoras para os problemas.

Aprender a pensar criticamente – como formular de forma imaginativa perguntas e considerar múltiplas perspectivas – tem sido historicamente associado a uma educação em artes liberais, e não a um currículo da escola de negócios, então essa alteração representa algo de uma mudança profunda para os líderes da escola de negócios. Roger Martin

Ser capaz de fazer perguntas tolas, imaginativas e considerar várias perspectivas pode implicar um afastamento do nosso egocentrismo.

Nós temos uma tendência para procurar informação que valide ou confirme as nossas opiniões e afirmações e isso promove uma selecção quase automática das perguntas que fazemos.

Então como é que isso acontece?

“As pessoas, quase sempre, percebem o seu pensamento como sendo correcto e verdadeiro; caso contrário iria alterá-lo (ou assim pensam). Como resultado, quando confrontados com formas alternativas de ver as coisas, as pessoas muitas vezes rejeitam-nas como ‘ilógicas’ ou ‘não razoáveis’ simplesmente porque os pontos de vista são diferentes dos seus. Isso leva a uma espécie de rigidez em pensamento e acção. Quando as pessoas estão neste “modus operandi”, vêem o seu discurso como perfeitamente razoável, e enquanto as pessoas o validarem, eles estão felizes. Mas em caso de contestação, muitas vezes resistiam, retaliam ou amuam. – Linda Elder

Sem amuar ou resistir, pensar em todos em todas as perspectivas e todos os pontos de vista pertinentes a fim de os compreender e a par disso ser idealista, realista e pragmático é um hábito mental que deveria ser cultivado conscientemente.

Isso significa abdicar do nosso próprio vista quando outro é considerado mais razoável, e talvez mais importante.

Isso significa ser justo. Isso significa criar empatia.

Linda Elder diz que “o pensamento crítico implica a integração de três dimensões: Ser idealista (capaz de imaginar um mundo melhor). Realista (ver as coisas como elas são); e pragmática (adoptando medidas eficazes para se mover em direcção aos nossos ideais).

O pensamento crítico e integrativo é a capacidade de identificar, avaliar e construir argumentos e propostas de soluções para os problemas. As pessoas devem ser capazes, através da lógica de análise e síntese, de categorizar informações, distinguir entre dados relevantes e irrelevantes e prever os resultados.

As pessoas hábeis na arte do pensamento crítico têm um de questionar tudo. Mesmo as suas próprias opiniões. Elas não se sentam necessariamente no chão no meio de qualquer debate, mas eles entendem a falibilidade potencial das fontes, e reconhecem a existência legítima de outros pontos de vista…sujeitos a exame, juntamente com os seus próprios. Torna-se possível, portanto, uma significativa exploração e discussão de temas. – Lane Wallace

Este foi um espaço de reflexão que deve ser alargado aos líderes que perderam bons hábitos!

Os líderes devem pôr em causa pressupostos, adoptar diferentes perspectivas, procurar potencial e fazer a gestão da ambiguidade!

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Putting Higher Principles into Innovation Management: How to Be Guided by The Classical Approach to People by Deb Mills-Scofield

As innovation becomes a prevalent activity in organizations is it time to rethink how we approach the culture of innovative people? Deborah Mills-Scofield who previously worked with Bell Labs and now consults on innovations practice, argues we need a return to timeless values if we are going to make innovation sustainable.

 

Why Customer Services isn’t always that important! By Wim Rampen

When reading “the web” one could be lead to think that a company’s poor Customer Services is the worst that could happen. Any mistake in this area would easily set off negative word-of-mouth. Armed with Social Media the “crowds” will seriously harm the brand(ed) reputation, seriously damaging a company’s growth opportunity. Some even consider Customer Services the new Marketing. The importance of Customer Services though, which in lots of cases is considered to be the same as the importance of a company’s (multi channel) customer services contact center, can easily be overrated.

 

A Lesson in Engaged Artistry by Gianpiero Petriglieri via Ralph Ohr

Orchestra conductors are surely overexploited by management thinkers to describe what effective leaders do in organizations. They attract and inspire talent, strive for excellence, discipline improvisation, foster innovation, set pace, build and resolve tension, and transform potential cacophony into melodious harmony—all with unique, personal style.

 

Innovation starts with empathy by Jorge Barba

A recent article on Fast Co. Design ‘Innovation always starts with empathy‘ got me thinking about empathy and for some reason I remembered the above text from  Colours of the wind from Disney’s Pocahontas.

 

14 smart tips from single women entrepreneurs by Daniel Pink

Erin Albert is a multi-talented, multi-tasking pharmacy professor at Butler University (Go Bulldogs! Beat Wisconsin!) who runs a couple of businesses and is pursuing a law degree on the side. Since she obviously has lots of time on her hands, she’s also just written a book.

 

“Design Thinking” Isn’t a Miracle Cure, but Here’s How It Helps by Helen Walters

The term has come in for a lot of scorn. But it’s because we haven’t been clear about what it actually entails, argues Helen Walters.

 

How Innovation and IT Drive Productivity by Andrea Meyer

Point: Getting maximum benefit from innovation requires new organizational practices

Story: In their book Wired for Innovation, Erik Brynjolfsson and Adam Saunders show how innovation and IT drive productivity growth. Productivity growth explains how cars, for  example, went from costing an average of three years of salary a century ago to costing only seven months of salary today

 

How Technology Evolves by Greg Sattel

Sometimes it’s hard to tell if technology is something to love or to fear. Are computers making us smarter or dumbing us down? Are genetically modified foods a miracle or a menace?

 

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The Art of the Dumb Question by Deb Mills-Scofield

When I was a child, my parents always answered a question with an answer that led to another question.  So early on, I learned to just keep asking questions.  It drove my teachers nuts (don’t get me started on education!) and drives my husband nuts (like that’s the only reason!).  Just to bug my husband further,  I’ve taught our kids to do the same thing!  Despite this annoying habit, it’s served me pretty well in my career, learning a lot (much of which I can’t remember) along the way.

 

Spur your Personal Growth with Creative Guidance by Teresa van Lanen

I once heard that all the answers and support are right in front of us, clearing the mind and opening the spirit will get us there. It’s kind of like when you can’t find your car keys or the one sock that matches the other in your hand and no matter how hard you try to retrace your steps and dig through the drawer, you cannot find it

 

Tapping for Emotional Freedom by Kat Tansey

I’ve been fooling around with the Emotional Freedom Technique (EFT), or “Tapping” as it is being called by more and more people, for several years.

 

Small Things Are Big by Becky Robinson

We’ve had a lot of new visitors to Weaving Influence over the past few days.

Can I tell you I love that?

We’ve also had a lot of conversation from visitors who have commented for the first time. Thank you.

 

Dinosaur Communications Hold You Back? By Ellen Weber

Dinosaur communication departments impede innovation, much like spiked speed bumps obstruct an Indianapolis 500 race.

 

Maker, fixer, tinkerer, techie, hacker, inventor, whiz by Clare O’neill

Recognise yourself in the title?  You are legion…

In a fascinating survey, researchers at MIT have shown that UK consumers spend more on product development than the whole of UK industry does. 

 

Pollen’s Love Released in France!…Oh la la! By Marion Chapsal

Last saturday, at the cinema,  as I was waiting in a joyful excitement for The King’s Speech to start, I came across an amazingly surprising and beautiful trailer.

 

Could it be time for a change? By Robyn McMaster

If you went down the hall and peered inside Bologna’s standard 11th Century lecture room, you wouldn’t feel as if you were in a museum.  You would feel at home.  John Medina in Brain Rules Minus mikes and PowerPoints, what’s the difference?

 

Change Management by Lubaia

How do you manage changes in your project?

The change is one of the most difficult things to deal with during a project. There are many reasons for this, you don’t have extra resources, the project timeline can not change, the budget is short, etc.

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What is the Customer’s Role in Breakthrough Innovation?

by Ralph Ohr

There has been quite a lot of discussion recently about a post by Jens Martin Skibsted and Rasmus Bech Hansen, titled “User-Led Innovation Can’t Create Breakthroughs; Just Ask Apple and Ikea”. Their major claim is: “Great brands lead users, not the other way around.”

 

With The Emerging Of The New “Object-Culture” – Meanings Are Sought Through Social Identities, Visual Information and Interfaces / Interactions by Idris Mootee

There are objects that I love for many different reasons. They range from my Leicas to my JBL speakers, LV bags, Prada shoes and Mac computers.

 

For Innovation, Best Practice is a Verb not a Noun! By Deb Mills-Scofield

One of the central tenets of 20th Century business has been ‘best practices’.   Let’s dissect this veritable oxymoron:

  • Best: highest quality, standing (at a point in time, place and context)
  • Practice: a habit or custom (noun) or to do repeatedly to acquire proficiency

 

Follow-up on Destroying Customer Value: @Telfort is listening.. by Wim Rampen

Last week’s post Destroying Customer Value was in it’s essence not about getting attention from the Telco company involved (being Telfort).

 

Reviewing “A New Culture of Learning” by John Hagel

We all have the uncomfortable feeling that the education we received is serving us less and less well. The reassuring notion that the concentrated dose of education in our younger years would serve us well for the rest of lives appears increasingly suspect.

 

Dinosaur Communications Hold You Back? By Ellen Weber

Dinosaur communication departments impede innovation, much like spiked speed bumps obstruct an Indianapolis 500 race.

 

Design renews its relationship with science by Tim Brown

I have noticed a growing conversation recently concerning the relationship between design and science.

 

New Research: We Are More Creative When We Help Others Than Ourselves by Bob Sutton

There is an interesting set of findings from psychological experiments that suggest we see others’ flaws and strengths more clearly than our own (I wrote about this in Good Boss, Bad Boss) and that, on average, human-beings make more rational decisions when make them for others rather than themselves.

 

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The Importance of Organizational Design and Structure by Gill Corkindale via @ralph_ohr

One of the wonderful things about being a coach is that I meet hundreds of executives who freely share their business and leadership challenges with me. As well as helping me understand how hard it is to run an organization, they show me how they are managing to adapt — or not — to changing organizational structures.

 

Invention without Commercialization = Extinction, not Innovation by Deb Mills-Scofield

My job at Bell Labs was to invent and create.  We dreamed up all sorts of wonderful solutions to problems that did and didn’t exist.  But how did we learn about these problems? Some we just thought up.  Some came from AT&T corporate product management & marketing. But few came from seeing customers firsthand, so we ended up using ourselves as ‘examples’ – not good.  AT&T corporate product managers and marketers were supposed to commercialize our inventions; to decide if it met the market needs or if there even was a need.  

 

Innovate like a Kindergartner by Peter Merholz

One of my most popular posts for hbr.org is “Why Design Thinking Won’t Save You“. It clearly struck a chord, as well over a year since it was posted, it still regularly gets picked up in the Twittersphere.

 

The Future of Design Consulting: 4 Business Models to Consider by design sojourn via @vanetuit

Over the recent Chinese New Year holidays, I met a very well traveled designer. We were discussing the pitfalls of running a design consultancy, and that conversation eventually led to consulting business models.

 

Are You Different on Purpose? By Bill Taylor

Roy Spence, one of the toughest-minded business thinkers I know, is a cofounder of GSD&M, the legendary advertising agency based in Austin, Texas. In a provocative and saucy book, It’s Not What You Sell, It’s What You Stand For

 

Welcome to the Age of Dilemma by Umair Haque

Another week, another potentially destabilizing global mini-crisis. This time, it’s (yet another) global food crisis: food prices are set to skyrocket and the FAO’s food price index is already spiking. It’s likely to ignite even more political instability and social turmoil — in layman’s terms, that’s riots, panics, protests, and violence.

 

HOW TO: Build & Maintain A Talent Community by Heather R. Huhman

A talent community is not a list of candidates on a web page or in a spreadsheet; it is an environment consisting of people who can share ideas for the purpose of career networking or social recruiting of candidates.

 

Because it is time you take Customer Service seriously.. by Wim Rampen

Despite the economic crisis, the rise of the “Social Customer” and the popularity of Customer engagement strategies through Social Media, I sometimes get the feeling that managers in Customer Services put in a lot more effort to ensure the company does not get bad press, or negative “buzz” in stead of providing a better then expected Customer service experience. We know companies do not always take Customer service seriously. I think though many managers of Customer Services should start taking their discipline a lot more serious than they are doing today..

 

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Reinventing Management – A Process by Deb Mills-Scofield

As we look around us, 20th C regimes, institutions and businesses are failing.  It seems everyone is writing a book on management needs to change.

 

Unlocking your creativity to fulfill your personal vision by  Jorge Barba

I love this! Talk about freeing your mind, here’s a high powered conversation you don’t want to miss…

 

Building Creative Collaboration by Greg Satell

Soft power, noted Joseph Nye, is the power to get what you want without coercion.  That’s a good kind of power to have, but hard to define.  Nye argues that it is a combination of lots of things, like economic success, technological prowess, good governance, lack of corruption, etc.

 

A lesson about (de)motivating employees by Dan Ariely via @ralph_ohr

A few months ago an ex-student of mine, who was at the time working for a big software company, contacted me and asked me to meet with her and her team later in the summer.

 

Taking Work-Life Balance By The Horns by Judy Martin

A colleague recently told me she was suffering from anxiety about heading back to work, after a week off.  In gory detail, she described a nightmare in which her manager littered her office with big black hairy spiders. Pretty much how she feels at work, she effused.  “The creepy crawlies never seem to go away.”

 

I am a Knowledge Worker and a Serendipity Hippie by Riitta Raesmaa

Last weekend I attended Professor Esa Saarinen’s seminar, and as always I was touched and inspired by his thinking. Few days earlier futurist Jarno M. Koponen wrote a beautiful blog post about creative future thinking. Both of these gentlemen touched on a question I’ve been thinking lately:

What metrics should we apply for open innovation? By Stefan Lindegaard

I hear more and more requests on how to apply metrics to open innovation.

Personally, I do not really believe in metrics. The innovation community (companies, consultants and academics) has tried this for the last 20 years on innovation in general, but no success.

 

The Next Time You Pick Up The Phone To Call A Customer Service Agent You Might End Up Talking To An Inmate In Tijar, India by  Idris Mootee

Global customer servicing outsourcing is touching us everyday and sometimes you don’t know who you’re talking to on the phone or online when you call your service provider.

 

Is Open Innovation Sustainable? Video Interview with Henry Chesbrough

Professor Henry Chesbrough speaks with Gary Hamel,Visiting Professor of Strategic and International Management at the London Business School and Director of the Management Lab.

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Service Design meets (Social) CRM by Wim Rampen

This is part 2 in a short series on Service Design. I would recommend reading part 1 before reading this.

Recap: What is Service?

As I tried to explain a couple of days ago, I think Service Design is about designing for Service, not serviceS. Where I defined Services as:

 

Natural Innovation by John Steen 

A couple of weeks before Christmas I noticed something odd in the garden of my house in Brisbane. While I often see ants around the home, there were now large clusters of ants moving upstairs and taking their eggs with them. The folklore is that when this happens it means that we are in for a really wet spell of weather and I am on the record with Tim as making a prediction based on this.

 

Use constraints to fuel your creativity by Jorge Barba

Quickly think of as many white things as you can in ten seconds.  Now think of white things in your kitchen.  Did the more constrained prompt spark more ideas? Yes.

 

Lens Shifting: Leading Indicators for Innovation by Deb Mills-Scofield

Recently, my friend Jackie Hutter and I did a workshop on Leading Indicators for Innovation from 2 aspects: 1) how can you look around you for leading indicators of areas ripe for innovation; and 2) what are leading indicators in your innovation process itself. 

 

The art of innovation by Kate Oakley, Brooke Sperry and Andy Pratt via Ralph-Ohr (PDF)

 

How Children Perceive “Vintage” Technology – Design mind via Wim Rampen

Design is all about context. When that contextual information is removed, products can be very confusing. As designers we often see this when people are introduced to a new technology that is manifested in a design that breaks so strongly with tradition that they don’t know how to use it. We often try to build in affordances that allow them to relate their current technology to their new technology. Think of how the play button from your Walkman went straight to you Discman, then to your iPod, and as a digtal button on interfaces.

 

Communities of Passion…and com-passion? Raymond Campbell

The main challenges we faced was doing what seemed to be an impossible task for the group leading the effort and seeking the assistance of others to come alongside us…catch the same fire and enthusiasm to make this happen in such a short period of time.

 

The open innovation model – Ideas from Henry Chesbrough Ideas economy

 

Have a nice week!

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The Art of Integrative Thinking by Roger Martin and Hilary Austen via @ralph_ohr

Modern leadership needs integrative thinking. Integrative thinkers

embrace complexity, tolerate uncertainty, and manage tension in searching for

creative solutions to problems.

 

Adam Smith Explains the Network Economy by Tim Kastelle

The economy is a network. To understand how new ideas integrate into it, we first have to understand how interconnected and interdependent it is. Here is a passage from The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith making this point (from Adam Gopnik’s good review of Smith’s work in The New Yorker):

 

Working With Strangers to Solve Open Innovation Challenges: What’s It Like? By Stefan Lindegaard

In writing and making public presentations about open innovation, I often remind people that while process is important, in the end success comes down to having people with the right mindset and skills. So much can be accomplished when a good team comes together, even when that team consists of experts in various disciplines around the globe who are total strangers to one another.

 

It’s Time for Some New Habits–the Year of the Meaning Organization by Umair Haque

This time of year we tend to subject ourselves to tough review. We zero in on our practices and tendencies and resolve to take up new, positive habits–and, more importantly, to break the bad. It can be a productive exercise if approached with a clear eye and dedicated follow-through. My question: why don’t we subject our institutions to the same ritualistic rigor?

Surprise yourself by Jorge Barba

We all have different likes and dislikes. That’s just how it is. A personal example how is I like video games and although I do have preferences for shooters, sports and espionage; I’ll give any genre a shot.

 

We Need To Change The Way We Use Trash, One Imagination At A Time. It Is About Behavior As Much As Economics. By Idris Mootee

We all love shopping and some do more than other. We love to buy shoes, clothes, electronic gadgets, toys and cameras. We all know we can’t continue on like this, the stuff we buy today is way worse than what we were buying a decade ago, everything has tons of electronic components inside which is really hard to recycle.

 

Team Guidelines From A New Boss: How Can He Make Sure People Live Them? By Bob Sutton

I got a fascinating note from an employee of a big company about the “team norms” that were articulated by his new boss.  I think they are great, but have a crucial question about them. Here they are: 

 

Happy or Valuable New Year? By Deb Mills-Scofield

21st century capitalism is shifting focus from making money to making meaning (ends vs. means, trailing indicators v leading indicators). This is good and necessary.  However, ‘happiness’ is starting to dominate discussions about 21st C capitalism, even in governments’ measures of economic growth

 

Have a nice weekend!