Currently viewing the tag: "Deb Mills-Scofield"

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Networking for Survival by  Deborah Mills-Scofield

We think about networking as a very modern notion, with our accumulation of virtual “friends,” “followers,” and people-who-might-be-useful-to-us-someday. To me, it is just an extension of what my people, my family have been doing since 70 AD — making critical connections that enable both our survival. The tools may have changed, but our reliance on the network has not. In fact, without the network, I literally wouldn’t be alive.

 

Innovation is Impossible by Tim Kastelle

James Altucher recently suggested that “Eat All You Want of the Foods You Love and Still Lose Weight” would be a great book title – that no matter what was inside, it would sell. It’s easy to see why. Many of us like to eat all we want of the foods we love, and we also want to lose weight, so if we could do both at the same time, wouldn’t that be great?

                                                                                                                                                      To Know, but Not Understand: David Weinberger on Science and Big Data by  David Weinberger via Ralph Ohr

In an edited excerpt from his new book, Too Big to Know, David Weinberger explains how the massive amounts of data necessary to deal with complex phenomena exceed any single brain’s ability to grasp, yet networked science rolls on.

                                                                                                                                                         The Philosophy of Motivation by Greg Satell

Peter Drucker, the legendary management theorist, told us that we have to “accept the fact that we have to treat almost anybody as a volunteer.”

                                                                                                                                                        Why Organizational Innovation Is So Difficult by Joe Evans

In all ecosystems, organisms that evolve to survive the elements of their environments will likely continue their existence. Those that do not continue to evolve will most likely perish. Likewise, for business organizations to evolve, they must innovate their products, services, technologies, policies, processes and structures to capitalize on social, economic and industry trends within their environment. This is easier said than done.

                                                                                                                                                      How To (Not) Get Smart About Big Data by Wim Rampen

If you are to believe the talk of twitter-town and its suburbs, due to the connectivity of numerous devices worldwide, we (will) also have available so much data, it is just waiting to be mined and will change how we do, well..,  just about everything. All this is being referred to as Big Data. The problem with all this data of course is the filtering.

                                                                                                                                                    How Design Thinking Can Enrich Business and Marketing Innovation by  BEN WOOD, MARK WHITING & DAVID STOCKS

Design empowered innovation combines the best of right and left brain thinking. It has the capacity to deliver better ideas, with more relevance, realized earlier.

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Improving Your Idea Generating Skills… by  Paul Williams

A hunch is your creativity trying to tell you something” – Unknown

So where do you find yourself and what are you doing when you get a great idea…or any idea?

I’ll bet that you said something close to one of these:

Cultivating Innovation When The Future Is Unknowable by Joe Brewer via Ralph-Ohr

Sometimes what we think we know is more consequential than what we actually know.  As we nestled into our beds on the night of September 10th, 2001 most of us did not know that we would awaken to a terrorist attack that would unleash a decade of global unrest.

Before You Decide Vision Is Passé: 8 Reasons Why Vision Matters by Jesse Lyn Stoner

Have you ever been part of a team that magically came together? -where everyone thoroughly enjoyed being part of the team, worked together in synchronicity, and where you were really proud of what you accomplished?

The Rise of Shared Value by Arie Goldshlager

The JWT’s trendspotters recently included The Rise of Shared Value in their Top Ten trends for 2012:

Large Organizations and the Business Model Canvas by Paul Hobcraft

Recently I was having a ‘conversation’ with Alexander Osterwalder concerning the limited adoption of the Business Model Canvas within large organizations. I was asking him if he agreed and if he had any thoughts on this.

                                                                                                                                                 How permission to innovate leads to accidental innovation by Jorge Barba

Two weeks ago I wrote about the four signs that show that you have a culture of innovation. Well here’s another one:

A good sign that you’re innovating is when employees don’t ask for permission to do so. They just do it.

Use Your Value Proposition to Avoid Fatal Business Models by Tim Kastelle

What do you think of when you think of Swiss Watches?

You probably think of high-end brands, that have been making well-crafted watches for many years. Brands like Rolex, or Patek Philippe, or George Clooney and his Omega:

2012 – The Year of the Interface by Greg Satell

Besides his impressive array of trysts, Captain Kirk had very little on today’s average Joe. Personal communicators are now old hat, tricorders are right around the corner and even teleportation no longer seems completely out of reach.

Reinventing Collaboratively by Deborah Mills-Scofield

After co-creating on Business Model Generation with author Alex Osterwalder, I received an invitation from Steve Denning to review a book he was writing on transforming management (The Leader’s Guide to Radical Management).

Are You Standing Out Today? By Nilofer Merchant

People buy two categories of things.

The distinct. And the generic.

The distinct items are the things that have a limited commodity, that are artisan in nature, that are worth paying a premium for. They stand out for some reason. The generic items are, well, the things you find on Amazon.

Have a nice week!

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Status Quophiles and Quophobes by Deborah Mills Scofield

Ever know anyone who will explicitly say he/she doesn’t think innovation is important? No! So listen carefully for the magic word – “but”.   Some of you know how much I love to challenge the status quo so here’s my theory: Status Quophiles see the glass as half empty and want to make sure it doesn’t become totally empty.  Status Quophobes are Innovators – they see the half empty glass as half full, waiting to be filled up!

Life’s What You Make It by Tim Kastelle

Well, we’re all getting older. What do you make of it? I ran across an interesting post by Ben Casnocha, which referenced an article by Benjamin Schwarz which includes this comment on John Updike:

The Pitfalls of Prediction by Greg Satell

Prognostication is a multi-billion dollar industry.  We have weathermen, Wall Street Analysts, political pundits and futurologists.  They all claim some expertise.

 

Hang Your Work in a Tree Tonight by Jesse Lyn Stoner

If you do what you love for a living, you’ll never work a day in your life. ~anonymous

An appealing thought, if it means living an integrated life.
However…there’s a big difference between living an integrated life and being consumed by work.

Creativity And Innovation In Small And Medium Size Firms by Idris Mootee

I am in Egypt this week and trying to finish three big Power Point decks, writing 6 documents and finished reading 63 documents with a slow Internet connection. And trying to finalize the editorial content for March 2012 issue of my magazine. It is not easy.

Collaboration Revs Results by Robyn McMaster

Bantering ideas back and forth triggered new insights for me and four other leaders around around the table.  Innovative possibilities spoken helped us see past familiar approaches to consider the experimental.  At times ideas were spoken so quickly it was hard to keep up!

Change will happen whether you like it or not by Jorge Barba

Companies are still scrambling with the rise of social networks like Twitter. If people think you suck they’ll gladly express themselves and let everyone else who listens to them. Oh and by the way, this happens in real-time.

8 Dangers of Collaboration by Nilofer Merchant

Most of what is written about collaboration is positive. Even hip. Collaboration is championed enthusiastically by the Enterprise 2.0 experts, as well as leading thinkers like Don Tapscott as the crucial approach for the 21st century.

Do Nice Guys Finish Last?  By Jonah Lehrer via Ralph-Ohr

In 1948, the legendary baseball manager Leo Durocher declared that “nice guys finish last.” Although Durocher would later deny the quote, his pithy line summarizes a popular and pessimistic take on human nature. When it comes to success, we assume that making it to the top requires ethical compromises.

Have a nice week!

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What is Intelligence? By Greg Sattel

We know intelligence when we see it.  Witty repartee at a cocktail party. Outstanding results on standardized tests.  Winning the big prize on a quiz show.

 

Why Most Meetings Suck by Ellen Weber

When Tom Hansen said most meetings suck, he hit on a rampant waste of human talent today.

That problem begs the question: How do you engage talents, considering that:

 

Innovation When All You Have is a Noodle by Tim Kastelle

Most of the inspirational innovation stories that we hear are about technology firms like Google, Amazon and Apple. This sometimes makes it difficult to help people find the connections to their work if they are in less sexy industries, like mining, education or government.

 

Diagnose and Cure Team Drift by  Jesse Lyn Stoner

One of the most common complaints I hear from managers is, “I want to re-energize our team. We used to be cohesive and enjoy working together.

 

The Science of Irrationality by Jonah Lehrer via Ralph Ohr

Here’s a simple arithmetic question: “A bat and ball cost $1.10. The bat costs $1 more than the ball. How much does the ball cost?”

                                                                                                                                                     Innovation’s Natural Force by Deborah Mills-Scofield

A few weeks ago, I was driving by an abandoned Ford plant in Lorain, OH.   The plant, a key regional employer closed in 2005.  What struck me were the parking lots.  Some of them had become fields!

                                                                                                                                                     

Is innovation really going to save the economy? By Jorge Barba

First of all, I’m not even sure what we want out of innovation. If we take what we see out there as a signal, then we sure aren’t innovating anything.

 

Creativity in Business: My Interview with Bill Smith, PhD by Michelle James

Interview # 31 in our Creativity in Business Thought Leader Series is with 
Bill Smith, PhD, President of  ODII. Bill is an innovative thinker and practitioner in the field of leadership, organization and social development.

 

Service Design: The Most Important Term You Haven’t Heard Of by Darren Weiss

James Rock, the managing director and chief business designer for Cultivar Consulting Limited, a business and services design consultancy, talks about service design, its benefits and why it’s important for your business.

Have a nice week!

Enjoy it

 

The Finnish Awesomeness and Entrepreneurship by Riitta Raesmaa

Something exceptional is happening here in Finland. However I think that the foundation for that has existed a long time, only to wait its time to come. And it seems that the time is here and now. Let me explain.

Who’s Next – A spotlight on innovative thinkers who are changing the future of business. FastCompany via Ralph-Ohr

We’re helping people make decisions faster and in a better way,” says Christy Liu, cofounder and director of marketing at Wanderfly. “We’re also getting people to travel more. The whole idea of the site is about inspriation, so what we hope to do and what we are already doing is is getting people sort of off their bums and traveling the world.

The Customer Is Always Wrong by Wim Rampen

I think the Customer is wrong many more times than she’s right..

Customers don’t fill out (online) forms like they should, they don’t read the terms and conditions when they buy, they are wrong about what they thought they read (somewhere), about how to use your product and how to maintain it..

 

Co-Creating Business Models by Deborah Mills-Scofield

In 2009,  I was privileged to co-create an awesome book, Business Model Generation, with Alex Osterwalder and Yves Pigneur.     Co-creating the book with Alex was an amazing experience, created some lasting friendships with other co-creators, and of course Alex.  After Angela Dunn‘s monthly twitter-chat, #ideachat, I decided to ask Alex what made him decide to do co-create this book:

Your Customers’ Big Irritation is a Big Opportunity by Arie Goldshlager

I found this Don Sull  “top 10” field guide to clues for hidden breakthrough opportunities article packed full of instructive observations. Please note particularly:

 

Let’s Be A Little More Creative About Creativity. And What Does Collective Creativiry Means? By Idris Mootee

Scholarly interest in creativity ranges widely: Topics to which it is relevant include the relationship between creativity and general intelligence; the mental and neurological processes associated with creative activity; the relationship between personality type and creative ability; the relationship between creativity and mental health;

The Fat File by Patti Blackstaffe

Do you keep a file that holds all of the awards, recognition and comments made to you about your performance?  I do.  I keep everything written about my performance by the companies for whom I have worked in addition to the customers and clients I have served and I call it my Fat File.

How to Perform Under Pressure by Greg Satell

Okay, it’s your big day.  Everything is on the line.  All of your blood and sweat has led up to this point and now it really matters.  What happens next is up to you.

Have a nice week! 

Enjoy it!

 

Creative thinking is not a one time activity by Jorge Barba

Late last year, in response to an article that stated that you need to stifle your creativity in order to get promoted, I argued that you needed to become a credible innovator to cut through the smoke and keep those objections at bay.

 

Pave the way for impact by striking a balance between the small and the big Jenny Comiskey via Ralph Ohr

Attempting to solve large-scale social challenges can be an overwhelming task. They are the domain of messy, interdependent, complicated issues, outdated models, and often mired in the status quo. It’s not unusual to face a paralysis in action or become stuck in endless debate when attempting change within this environment.

 

Iteration, Collaboration, and Innovation by Deborah Mills-Scofield

 “Even a brown box can be innovative when you think about supply chain, how you bring it to market,” Waite says. But that can only happen if you provide an atmosphere where your employees’ innovation can thrive.

 

Mind the Gap by Tim  Kastelle

I did a workshop last week with a group working on improving innovation within the Australian school system. I played my normal role of grenade-thrower, errr, thought-provoker on the topic of innovation, while working with eight other people that all have backgrounds in education.

 

Five Easy Ways To Tell If An Organization Is Really Values-Driven by Jesse Lyn Stoner

What do Zappos, Ben and Jerry’s, and Southwest Airlines have in common? They are all financially successful, values-driven companies.

 

How to Fix the System by Greg Satell

Pissed off at the system?  Most people are, as they should be. Systems suck.  Anybody who says he likes the system is either a liar, a fool or the guy who created it in the first place.

 

How NOT to Disrupt Yourself or The Pioneer-Maintainer’s Dilemna by Marion Chapsal

After read­ing @JohnsonWhitney’s excel­lent post on Har­vard Busi­ness Review, “Dis­rupt Your­self”, which encour­ages pio­neer and innovator’s val­ues, one of the com­ments caught my attention.

 

Towards Implementing Effective Employee-Driven Innovation Systems by Arie Goldshlager

This article outlines several of my key findings from a recent implementation of an Employee-Driven Innovation system.  The system facilitated generation, evaluation, development, promotion, and selection of employees’ ideas:

 

Ray Anderson: how to show the art of the possible by Mallen Baker

Ray Anderson has sadly lost his fight against cancer.
It’s worth reflecting on the example he gave, because it isn’t just that he was an inspirational figure who argued for a sustainable business model.

Have a great week!

 

 

 

 

Enjoy it!

 

Renaissance.. by Wim  Rampen

This morning I was listening to news coverage on the Oslo attack.. I don’t have this often, nor soon, but shivers continue to go down my spine listening to survivor stories and even when thinking about them..

 

Systems Intelligence, Serendipity and Listening for the Better Decisions by Riitta Raesmaa

I’ve earlier blogged about how I find intuition and seeing the value of the tacit knowledge as very interesting perspectives for the decision-making.

 

How Social Network Analysis Solves Real World Problems by Greg Satell

I’m LinkedIn.  I’ve got friends on Facebook.  I tweet.  Yo, I got stooopid Klout!  Look at me!  I’m connected!

And so are you and lots of other things, like ecosystems, molecules, our bodies’ metabolisms, the list goes on.

 

Innovation as a Means for Economic Evolution by Paul Hobcraft

Economic growth is an outcome of the innovation trajectory we set. Today managing innovation is complex; often success is measured and valued by the creative destruction of others.

 

Paradox of Innovation & Status Quo by Deborah Mills Scofield

As much as I love change, innovation, #RCUS (Random Collisions of Unusual Suspects per Saul Kaplan) and challenging the Status Quo, I realized how much the comfort and haven of some Status Quo means to me as we got settled at our place in Maine. 

 

In the Eye of the Beholder by Jason Plaks via Ralp Ohr

Imagine two people, Jim and John. Jim planned to succeed in business and accomplished his goal through a series of deliberate steps. John fell into the exact same business success through serendipity and coincidence.

 

A Trick of the Mind by Ronald Bailey

Superstitions arise as the result of the spurious identification of patterns. Even pigeons are superstitious. In an experiment where food is delivered randomly, pigeons will note what they were doing when the pellet arrived, such as twirling to the left and then pecking a button, and perform the maneuver over and over until the next pellet arrives

 

Bust Your Innovation Myths by Art Markman

It is common to tell stories of great discoveries. Hundreds of years later, we still talk about Galileo Galilei dropping balls of different weights off the Leaning Tower of Pisa to shatter existing beliefs about the way objects fall

 

Nothing kills an idea faster than common sense by Luke Williams

In his book This Means This, This Means That, Sean Hall asks readers to vote on which of two sentences is the best. “The cat sat on the mat.,” or “The cat sat on the dog’s mat?”

I know that may sound painfully simple, but it illustrates the point beautifully.

 

Have a nice week!

 

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Why Diversity is Good for Business by Jeanette Mulvey via Ralph-Ohr

There’s lots of talk about innovation being the key to growing American businesses, but exactly how companies get innovative remains less clearly defined. One way to drive innovation, according to a new Forbes study, is to hire a more diverse work force.

 

Getting Open Innovation Participation by Andrea Meyer

Point: Crowdsourcing and open innovation efforts rely on participation.  Attracting participants and encouraging activity is a key success factor in obtaining and vetting new product, service and process innovation ideas.

 
‘Better’ is the more practical approach to innovation in general by Jorge Barba

It all starts with the question: How can I make this better?

Framing is important and when talking about innovation that usually means deciding between incremental and radical change. Yet for most businesses, they don’t want to hear about change. They want the world they exist in just the way it is, especially if they’ve had some level of success.

 

Set Up Your Team for Success by Jesse Lyn Stoner 

Do you have a new team or are you starting a new project? Most teams rush into the work of the team without getting clear agreements in the beginning about where they are going or how they want to get there.

 

And the All Time Winner is… by Wim Rampen

We’ve already past the first 6 months of this year. A good time to take a look at what you have been reading around here. I’ve put together two lists: one Top 5 of all time best viewed posts and one Top 5 of the best viewed posts over the first six months of this year.

 

Incumbentitis – The Anti-Innovation Disease by Deb Mills-Scofield

Well, will congress put the country or their own political careers first?  You’d think they should be one and the same but we know they aren’t. With the upcoming elections, getting re-elected will matter more.  In 2010, it was out with the ‘old’, in with the new, mostly.  Washington DCers (and Wall Street) want desperately to maintain the status quo, yet America is asking for government by the people, of the people and for the people (sound familiar?). Can the US Government re-invent itself? Well, can big established companies even do it?

 

Transformation further Distilled by Sinan Si Alhir

Thriving and high performing organizations are founded on strong cultures, which involve shared values, strategy alignment, and interconnection. Such organizations achieve 4 times higher revenue, 7 times more expanded work force, 12 times higher stock prices, and 756% higher net income. However, approximately 70% of all change initiatives focused on improving performance fail!

 

The Mona Lisa Code by Greg Satell

Everybody knows the Mona Lisa.  She’s iconic; as much of a symbol of art as art itself. Housed in Paris but reproduced everywhere, there is probably nothing else on earth that so thoroughly fuses the ridiculous and the sublime as the Mona Lisa.

 

The New Game Of Strategy: Applied Design Thinking In Business Innovation And Transformation by Idris Mootee

Just when I thought I can have 2 days in an office then I realized I have to be In NYC tomorrow for a few days. I am writing this post on a flight after missing my connection in Houston, and just finished teaching a three days Strategy graduate course with a focus on strategic innovation and design thinking.

Have a nice week 

 

 

Enjoy it!

 

Tackling Complexity and Wicked Problems with Design Thinking by Thierry de Baillon and Ralph-Ohr

The world we live in becomes increasingly complex. Complex systems in different areas of our life, such as business, environment, economy etc. involve ever larger numbers of interacting elements.

 

The Economics of Co-Creation. Can What Happened To Microbrewery Happens To The Auto Industry? By Idris Mootee

A lot of talk and interest around the concept of co-creation. It is no question that this is going to have asting implications of how products and experiences are designed, developed and marketed.

 

Is the customer always [or rarely] right? By Arie Goldshlager

This quote from Charlie Trotter was recently featured as a metacool Thought of the Day on Diego Rodriguez’s blog:

 

Innovation: The Age of the Heretic by Deb Mills-Scofield

For some reason, I’ve always been fascinated with the word “heretic”.  Perhaps it’s the Devil’s Advocate in me (oh! What a pun!).  Perhaps its because I love being ‘heretical.’ Perhaps its because being heretical is key to innovating.  And this word has been around for millennia! 

 

Design thinking The new office by John Hagel and John Seely Brown

From exercising with Wii to staying at boutique hotels, we are increasingly immersed in designed experiences. Our expectations grow. Even previously prosaic objects become better-designed set pieces in the scenes of our life, mimicking what the media show us we can have. From soap dishes to store signage, what is mundane we pass over for the more elegant alternative. 

 

Become A Critical Thinker by Karen Christensen

It is of course important to recognize that many people are working hard to create a better world – animal rights groups such as PETA, the Farm Sanctuary, the Humane Society, groups like Amnesty International and environmental groups trying to curb destruction of the planet are a few that come to mind. But what is missing is a conversation about what is at the root of all the problems these groups and other advocacy groups are attempting to address:

 

Innovation’s Nine Critical Success Factors by Vijay Govindarajan

Your organization won’t innovate productively unless some underlying factors are in good shape. If “10” is outstanding and “1” is poor, how do you rate your organization on each of these?

 

Innovation Lessons from Orson Welles by Tim Kastelle

I’m still in Italy, where one of the topics of conversation is the recent special issue of The Economist, which discussed some of the problems that the economy here has experienced during the Berlusconi years (the special articles are summarised and linked here).

Have a nice week!

 

 

Enjoy it!

 

P&G: A Very Early Open Innovation Adopter by Deb Mills-Scofield

(This post ends the summary of fabulous stories and interactions at the 3rd Open Innovation (OI) Summit at BW’s Center for Innovation & Growth: Practical Challenges of Global Open Innovation featuring P&G on April 21st.)

 

Innovation Myth: Ideas Spread Quickly by Tim Kastelle

When scientists first started talking about Artificial Intelligence in the 1950s and 1960s, a lot of the discussion centred around how to best create AI that would think like people do. This view of AI has dominated our imagination ever since.

 

The Contingent Effect of Absorptive Capacity: An Open Innovation Analysis by Andrew A. King and Karim R. Lakhani  

Does experience with adopting technology improve a person’s capacity for inventing better technology? On the other hand, does invention experience increase the capacity for adoption?

 

How to Create Fantastic Media User Experience by Greg Satell

An American jurist once famously remarked that, although he couldn’t define pornography, he knows it when he sees it.  In other words, porn looks like porn, seedy and crass (or so I’ve heard).  Nobody would mistake it for anything else.

 

The future is podular by Dave Gray

One of the most difficult challenges companies face today is how to be more flexible and adaptive in a dynamic, volatile business environment. How do you build a company that can identify and capitalize on opportunities, navigate around risks and other challenges, and respond quickly to changes in the environment? How do you embed that kind of agility into the DNA of your company?

 

Superstar Leadership: Workplace Damage Control by Meghan Biro

I’ve written lately about various aspects of workplace culture – People are always the number one consideration in my opinion. This topic always directly relates to recruitment and employee retention. It’s inescapable.

 

Presentation: Customer Service, Serious Business? By Wim Rampen

Early february I wrote a post titled: Because it is time you take Customer Service seriously. For my speaking engagement on the 2011 Dutch Customer Contact Days in Utrecht this week, I translated the post into a 30-minute presentation, I’d like to share with you here.

 

Stories From the Field: Insights for Intern Training and Mentoring by Danielle McCulloch

This Story from the Field is based on Fuentek’s real-world experience with training tech transfer interns at a major research university

 

A $300 idea that is priceless by Schumpeter via @ralph_ohr

Applying the world’s business brains to housing the poor

 

From Personalized to Empathetic Technologies by Bradley Kreit via @ariegoldshlager

 

There’s a lot to like about Eli Pariser’s recent TED talk about the ways in which algorithms designed to personalize our experiences of digital information, in effect, put us into information bubbles. In effect, he argues that as sites like Google and Facebook customize and increasingly large percentage of the content we see, we’ll naturally, and without our knowledge, be exposed to a progressively narrower range of new ideas and information.

 

Have a nice week!