Currently viewing the tag: "ariegoldshlager"

 

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The Problem With Communications Planning by Greg Satell

What is communications planning? I don’t mean to be cheeky, but I would assume that it should have something to do with communicating.

 

How ‘Sticky’ is Design Thinking? By will novosedlik via @ralph_ohr

On its way to meme-hood, even before it has had a chance to gain purchase in the minds of the people who need it most, the term ‘design thinking’ is showing signs of mutational stress that threaten a common understanding of its value and validity.

 

Employees don’t always share well with others, says new paper exposing “knowledge hiding.” By Rotman via @ariegoldshlager

Why isn’t knowledge transfer happening more often in companies spending money on it?

Maybe it’s because their staff don’t always want to share.

 

The Problem with Fitting New Ideas Into Old Business Models by Tim Kastelle

Malcolm Gladwell retells the story of the Xerox Palo Alto Research Center in the latest issue of the New Yorker (it’s readable behind a paywall here). The story of PARC is fascinating, and Gladwell provides a nice twist to it. One of the main threads in the story concerns their invention of the laser printer.

 

The Beginning of a New Discipline by Idris Mootee

Prague is mystical with a mix of medieval, Renaissance, and Art Nouveau architecture and the design scene is slowly taking shape. You still see traces of history of what communism had done to the city even after these buildings are completely restored. It is where Renaissance meets neo-Gothic and the baroque structures from the 18th centuries

 

Creating Infectious Action – Innovation Uncensored by Jennifer Aaker

“Slideshare”

 

The Different Taxonomies of Open Innovation by OIC editor

Professor Henry Chesbrough speaks with Gary Hamel, Visiting Professor of Strategic and International Management at the London Business School and Director of the Management Lab.

 

Can You Be Happy at Work? Should You Be? By Liz Alt Kislik

Consider these scenarios, each from a different organization, and the unfortunate, but logical, conclusions that can be drawn from each one:

 

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How Open Innovation & Modularity Accelerate Innovation at PsionTeklogix by Andrea Meyer via @ralph_ohr

Point: Use open innovation and modularity to identify new product/service needs and accelerate your pace of innovation

 

Don’t look for examples, be the example by Jorge Barba

I have a client who has (so far) the only SaaS payroll management solution for small businesses in Mexico. This is both great and bad. Let me explain…

In our initial meeting I was told they used Workday as an example to follow. Their reasoning was that Workday has a very simple to use and intuitive interface, plus they are the ‘leaders’ in the field. The studied them rigorously and brought the same principles over to their solution.

 

The No. 1 Reason Companies Don’t Innovate by Deborah Mills Scofield

This saga of Congress, the White House and the budget is horrendous.  If they can’t agree on 1% of the budget for six months, can they really create a budget to cut the deficit and debt for a year?

You Have the Power to Choose Prosperity by Umair Haque

Our forebears struggled, toiled, fought, and sweated for generations to create a future better, wealthier, stronger than their own. The gifts they handed down — democracy, markets, justice, opportunity, reason, equality, liberty — are the fundamental institutions — the building blocks — of enduring, authentic prosperity.

What Do You Do with Criticism? By Robyn McMaster

 

During a state conference, when I began working with Ellen Weber, someone asked a question that I perceived totally “put down” brain research. Ever experience that?

 

Father as leader by John Maeda

I have regular open office hours for students, staff, and faculty — a practice that is often suggested for college presidents and for other leaders — the so-called “open door” philosophy. You learn all kinds of things about your organization when you do so.

 

Taking it home, part 2: passion, permission and prototyping by

Tom Maiorana via @ariegoldshlager

We just wrapped up a Design Thinking Bootcamp with 37 executives from around the globe. A few came from start-ups, others from large corporations. We even had a few folks from governmental agencies. Despite the difference in organizational backgrounds, one thing was on almost all of our participants’ minds: “How do we make design thinking work back home?”

 

What’s Political about Human Brains? By Ellen Weber

Have you ever wondered how political leaders’ brains work for or against ethics, reason and emotion?

News of political infighting, stalemates, accusations and posturing flood us daily.  We watch  opportunities for greatness fade, when political leaders  fail to grow emotional and rational skills to achieve what they campaigned for. But do you know why  brain operations differ between ethical and self-serving  public leaders?

 

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Designing for the Future Customer With Foresight Thinking by Bernhard Schindlholzer

Many organizations make the common mistake of designing a future product or service for today’s user. The user today will not be the same user you want to target in two or three product cycles.

Innovators Go It Alone by Ndubuisi Ekekwe Via @ariegoldshlager 

For a long time, Ford, Chrysler, and GM followed the same strategy: they built big gas-guzzlers. Asian competitors attacked that model, took market share, and transformed the U.S. automobile industry.

 

Collaboration and Co-creation: Incentives Are Important by Gaurav Bhalla Via @ralph_ohr

Customer collaboration and co-creation rests on a few key assumptions; that customers are passionate about the collaboration objective(s), and are willing and able to offer their time and creativity.

 

Open Innovation and Open Source: What They Share and How They Differ by Stefan Lindegaard

Based on the positive feedback from this webcast, we followed up with a conversation with regular opensource.com contributor Chris Grams and myself on the ways open source and open innovation are different and the things they share.

Relational Knowledge – We discover what we know in our relations by Daniel Durrant

Might our knowledge increase as we extend our relations further through structured learning networks? Relational knowledge transcends my brain and your brain, I can tell you that much. It is the relational space of reflection that I believe will take us to the next level: greater challenges, greater opportunities

Open Innovation Measurement – Part 3: Mass Customization by Volker Bilgram

Research on mass customization has examined the value accrued by co-creation in a stage of the value chain very close to commercialization.

Northrop Grumman, Eastman Chemical: Where to Innovate in this Economy by Andrea Meyer

Story: At Invention Machine’s Power to Innovate user conference, Jim Belfiore, Senior Director of Client Innovation and Practices, posed the question of where to innovate in this economy. Numerous presenters provided varied and surprising answers about where they find innovation and innovation-related opportunities.

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In 01/01/2001

Welcome to the 2001 Weblog Awards™. I’m Nikolai Nolan, and I’ll be your host for this month.

The Bloggies ™ are publicly-chosen Weblog Awards Given to Those related to writers and weblogs in 30 categories. And not much more introduction is necessary. Here are the rules:

 

Best article or essay about weblogs

What the Hell Is a Weblog? And why leave me alone Will not They? By Derek M. Powazek

I fell in love with the web to long time in August It entered my bloodstream Like a virus, took root, and changed my life forever. And, Almost Immediately, the virus spread to HAD.

I made piles of homepages, the oldest of Which are lost forever in the digital ether. I did my college thesis online. I got a job in the biz. I started with lofty goals vague projects like “doing it right.” I cared too much.

And You Can read today 10/10/10:

Modernizers, preservationists and Innovation by Tim Kastelle

Adam Thierer wrote a terrific post today exploring his theme optimists and pessimists major ongoing Comparing Internet. Has he written a very interesting series of posts Assessing the arguments of the pessimists That Think That the impact of the Internet on society is Generally bad (eg Nick Carr, Andrew Keen, Jaron Lanier), and the optimists think That That the Internet is transformational , and positive (eg, Clay Shirky, Kevin Kelly, all the guys Cluetrain Manifesto).

How to fight the confirmation bias by Jorge Barba

Aha! you got an idea and you want to add the research to know if you’re idea has wings. You set up google alerts, hashtags on twitter about related topics, follow people in the know, join related groups on Linkedin, etc.. .. You know the drill!

The future of open innovation by Oliver Gassmann, Ellen Enkel & Henry Chesbrough via @ ralph_ohr

Institutional openness is becoming Increasingly popular in practice and academia: open innovation, open R & D, and open business models. This special issue builds on the concepts, underlying Assumptions and Implications discussed in two previous R & D Management Special Issue (2006, 2009).

The Power Of Storytelling by chrisbrogan via @ Ariegoldshlager

Storytelling is the most powerful way to put ideas into the world today.
-Robert McKee

Innovation by Measure Outcomes Saul Kaplan

If Boston, NYC, San Francisco and are the top three U.S. cities of Their Economic why innovation, education, health care, energy systems and produce the results the Same Poor cities around the rest of the country?

Return on Failure: The Equation by Deb Mills-Scofield

What is failure? When things go According to the plan or not expectations, ending up with unexpected and / or undesired outcomes (Which We Can argue Could Have Been avoidable, or not). The key is ‘undesired’ – because if They Were not desired or expected and planned, That would still be great! But the Will we see, failure is a terrific way to learn. Maybe We Could measure the Return on Learning Failure: ROF.

 

What makes a great-capable Innovation Culture? By Drew CM

The part of Our ongoing research into how Organizations are building innovation-capable cultures, Primed Associates is conducting a new survey on the drivers of innovation culture. This survey Will Assess the current state of an organization’s support for processes, systems and behaviors That Influence ITS culture of innovation.

Mood and the Impact of Memorable Experiences by Mike Brown

Yesterday’s video with innovation gurus Stone Payton and Todd Schnick was shot last Wednesday night at # InnobeerATL to get together planned for the original # Innochat innovation guys along with friends from Atlanta and some of the AMA Marketing Research Conference and social media team.

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The Power of Co-Creation by Terry Kosdrosky via @ariegoldshlager

A Q&A with marketing professor Venkat Ramaswamy.

The traditional goods-and-services model of business is getting a makeover. Shoe companies, fashion houses — even cement companies — increasingly are engaged with customers, suppliers, and other stakeholders in a quest to co-create value.

 

Prepare for the unexpected by Jorge Barba

Imagine that you are a pilot and you have to fly through a 5 mile canyon upside down. It’s actually kind of hard to imagine because it’s not something you’re trained to do but it’s something that could happen in a real life situation.

 

Innovation and Porter’s Value Chain by Jeffrey Phillips via @ralph_ohr

I’m reviewing the relationship between a number of tried and true strategic management models and innovation, to see if those models and concepts hold up under the increasing importance of innovation.

 

Great Quotes on Open Innovation by Psion by Stefan Lindegaard

I just went through the tweets from our recent Twitter Chat with the executives from Psion and I found some great quotes worth sharing.

Seek Conflicting Views to Improve Innovation by Tim Kastelle

Innovation occurs when we creatively connect ideas in new and novel ways. If we are trying to differentiate ourselves, or our organisation, we need to be able to do this well. One way to approach this is to consciously seek out viewpoints and information that we normally wouldn’t encounter, or which conflict with our normal world view.

There Is One Thing That Is In Common Between Apple And China. Both Are Unstoppable And Locomotives Of Innovation For The Future. By Idris Mootee

It is so fascinating that everywhere I go in China this week, people are trying to sell me the Chinese versions of iPhone, iPad and other iThings that Apple has yet invented.

Sex and Smart Phones by Dan Ariely

Popular online dating site OkCupid recently released some numbers users reported regarding their sex lives. One interesting correlation was between smart phone usage and number of sexual partners. As you see below, women iPhone users (at the age of 30) report having had 12.3 sexual partners, over twice as many as women Android users. Male smart phone users show a similar jump: from 6.0 sexual partners on Android to 10 on the iPhone. Blackberry users fall almost exactly in the middle.

Bad Is Stronger Than Good: Why Good Bosses Eliminate the Negative First by Bob Sutton

Of all the tunes in the Johnny Mercer songbook, the most generally beloved must be “Accentuate the Positive” — whether your favorite cover is Bing Crosby’s, Willie Nelson’s, or someone else’s.

Stories Can Change the World by Saul  Kaplan

“Facts are facts, but stories are who we are, how we learn, and what it all means.”  My friend Alan Webber, Co-founder of Fast Company and author of Rules of Thumb, has it exactly right. 

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