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Why Diversity is Good for Business by Jeanette Mulvey via Ralph-Ohr

There’s lots of talk about innovation being the key to growing American businesses, but exactly how companies get innovative remains less clearly defined. One way to drive innovation, according to a new Forbes study, is to hire a more diverse work force.

 

Getting Open Innovation Participation by Andrea Meyer

Point: Crowdsourcing and open innovation efforts rely on participation.  Attracting participants and encouraging activity is a key success factor in obtaining and vetting new product, service and process innovation ideas.

 
‘Better’ is the more practical approach to innovation in general by Jorge Barba

It all starts with the question: How can I make this better?

Framing is important and when talking about innovation that usually means deciding between incremental and radical change. Yet for most businesses, they don’t want to hear about change. They want the world they exist in just the way it is, especially if they’ve had some level of success.

 

Set Up Your Team for Success by Jesse Lyn Stoner 

Do you have a new team or are you starting a new project? Most teams rush into the work of the team without getting clear agreements in the beginning about where they are going or how they want to get there.

 

And the All Time Winner is… by Wim Rampen

We’ve already past the first 6 months of this year. A good time to take a look at what you have been reading around here. I’ve put together two lists: one Top 5 of all time best viewed posts and one Top 5 of the best viewed posts over the first six months of this year.

 

Incumbentitis – The Anti-Innovation Disease by Deb Mills-Scofield

Well, will congress put the country or their own political careers first?  You’d think they should be one and the same but we know they aren’t. With the upcoming elections, getting re-elected will matter more.  In 2010, it was out with the ‘old’, in with the new, mostly.  Washington DCers (and Wall Street) want desperately to maintain the status quo, yet America is asking for government by the people, of the people and for the people (sound familiar?). Can the US Government re-invent itself? Well, can big established companies even do it?

 

Transformation further Distilled by Sinan Si Alhir

Thriving and high performing organizations are founded on strong cultures, which involve shared values, strategy alignment, and interconnection. Such organizations achieve 4 times higher revenue, 7 times more expanded work force, 12 times higher stock prices, and 756% higher net income. However, approximately 70% of all change initiatives focused on improving performance fail!

 

The Mona Lisa Code by Greg Satell

Everybody knows the Mona Lisa.  She’s iconic; as much of a symbol of art as art itself. Housed in Paris but reproduced everywhere, there is probably nothing else on earth that so thoroughly fuses the ridiculous and the sublime as the Mona Lisa.

 

The New Game Of Strategy: Applied Design Thinking In Business Innovation And Transformation by Idris Mootee

Just when I thought I can have 2 days in an office then I realized I have to be In NYC tomorrow for a few days. I am writing this post on a flight after missing my connection in Houston, and just finished teaching a three days Strategy graduate course with a focus on strategic innovation and design thinking.

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How Open Innovation & Modularity Accelerate Innovation at PsionTeklogix by Andrea Meyer via @ralph_ohr

Point: Use open innovation and modularity to identify new product/service needs and accelerate your pace of innovation

 

Don’t look for examples, be the example by Jorge Barba

I have a client who has (so far) the only SaaS payroll management solution for small businesses in Mexico. This is both great and bad. Let me explain…

In our initial meeting I was told they used Workday as an example to follow. Their reasoning was that Workday has a very simple to use and intuitive interface, plus they are the ‘leaders’ in the field. The studied them rigorously and brought the same principles over to their solution.

 

The No. 1 Reason Companies Don’t Innovate by Deborah Mills Scofield

This saga of Congress, the White House and the budget is horrendous.  If they can’t agree on 1% of the budget for six months, can they really create a budget to cut the deficit and debt for a year?

You Have the Power to Choose Prosperity by Umair Haque

Our forebears struggled, toiled, fought, and sweated for generations to create a future better, wealthier, stronger than their own. The gifts they handed down — democracy, markets, justice, opportunity, reason, equality, liberty — are the fundamental institutions — the building blocks — of enduring, authentic prosperity.

What Do You Do with Criticism? By Robyn McMaster

 

During a state conference, when I began working with Ellen Weber, someone asked a question that I perceived totally “put down” brain research. Ever experience that?

 

Father as leader by John Maeda

I have regular open office hours for students, staff, and faculty — a practice that is often suggested for college presidents and for other leaders — the so-called “open door” philosophy. You learn all kinds of things about your organization when you do so.

 

Taking it home, part 2: passion, permission and prototyping by

Tom Maiorana via @ariegoldshlager

We just wrapped up a Design Thinking Bootcamp with 37 executives from around the globe. A few came from start-ups, others from large corporations. We even had a few folks from governmental agencies. Despite the difference in organizational backgrounds, one thing was on almost all of our participants’ minds: “How do we make design thinking work back home?”

 

What’s Political about Human Brains? By Ellen Weber

Have you ever wondered how political leaders’ brains work for or against ethics, reason and emotion?

News of political infighting, stalemates, accusations and posturing flood us daily.  We watch  opportunities for greatness fade, when political leaders  fail to grow emotional and rational skills to achieve what they campaigned for. But do you know why  brain operations differ between ethical and self-serving  public leaders?

 

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Putting Higher Principles into Innovation Management: How to Be Guided by The Classical Approach to People by Deb Mills-Scofield

As innovation becomes a prevalent activity in organizations is it time to rethink how we approach the culture of innovative people? Deborah Mills-Scofield who previously worked with Bell Labs and now consults on innovations practice, argues we need a return to timeless values if we are going to make innovation sustainable.

 

Why Customer Services isn’t always that important! By Wim Rampen

When reading “the web” one could be lead to think that a company’s poor Customer Services is the worst that could happen. Any mistake in this area would easily set off negative word-of-mouth. Armed with Social Media the “crowds” will seriously harm the brand(ed) reputation, seriously damaging a company’s growth opportunity. Some even consider Customer Services the new Marketing. The importance of Customer Services though, which in lots of cases is considered to be the same as the importance of a company’s (multi channel) customer services contact center, can easily be overrated.

 

A Lesson in Engaged Artistry by Gianpiero Petriglieri via Ralph Ohr

Orchestra conductors are surely overexploited by management thinkers to describe what effective leaders do in organizations. They attract and inspire talent, strive for excellence, discipline improvisation, foster innovation, set pace, build and resolve tension, and transform potential cacophony into melodious harmony—all with unique, personal style.

 

Innovation starts with empathy by Jorge Barba

A recent article on Fast Co. Design ‘Innovation always starts with empathy‘ got me thinking about empathy and for some reason I remembered the above text from  Colours of the wind from Disney’s Pocahontas.

 

14 smart tips from single women entrepreneurs by Daniel Pink

Erin Albert is a multi-talented, multi-tasking pharmacy professor at Butler University (Go Bulldogs! Beat Wisconsin!) who runs a couple of businesses and is pursuing a law degree on the side. Since she obviously has lots of time on her hands, she’s also just written a book.

 

“Design Thinking” Isn’t a Miracle Cure, but Here’s How It Helps by Helen Walters

The term has come in for a lot of scorn. But it’s because we haven’t been clear about what it actually entails, argues Helen Walters.

 

How Innovation and IT Drive Productivity by Andrea Meyer

Point: Getting maximum benefit from innovation requires new organizational practices

Story: In their book Wired for Innovation, Erik Brynjolfsson and Adam Saunders show how innovation and IT drive productivity growth. Productivity growth explains how cars, for  example, went from costing an average of three years of salary a century ago to costing only seven months of salary today

 

How Technology Evolves by Greg Sattel

Sometimes it’s hard to tell if technology is something to love or to fear. Are computers making us smarter or dumbing us down? Are genetically modified foods a miracle or a menace?

 

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10 Open Innovation Questions for SME’s by Stefan Lindegaard

As a follow-up to my slightly provocative blog post, Why Open Innovation is Not for Small Companies, I have begun looking further into the interesting topic on how small companies can innovate with others

How Ideas Take Flight Fred Sheahan

I love this video lecture from Stanford’s Entrepreneurship Corner. Within it, Jennifer Aaker (Twitter: @aaker) explores the importance of happiness, meaning, and story in successful and powerful social media campaigns. I highly recommend spending an hour of your time on this topic; it’s immensely applicable to any business, education, and nonprofit organization with a need to leverage activism and outreach in a networked world.

 

The Path to Outcome-Driven Innovation by Bryan Mahoney

Innovation does not often come along on its own. As Hemingway might have said, there is no one rule to innovating. Sometimes it comes easily and perfectly; sometimes it’s like drilling through rock and blasting it out with charges.

 

Which Ideas Are the Good Ones? By Tim Kastelle

The New York Times has just published The 10th Annual Year in Ideas. As part of this, they asked Tyler Cowen to comment on the previous reviews. He noted this quote from the introduction to the piece:

 

Who’s Really Innovative? By Gary Hamel

If you were compiling a list of the world’s most innovative companies, which businesses would top your list? No one would be surprised if you picked Google, Apple or Amazon, but what about Wal-Mart? (Huh?) Or PG&E (a utility, for crying out loud)? Surely there must be some mistake! Or how ’bout the Chinese data equipment maker Huawei (umm, who are they)? While a few of these companies might not have made it onto your top 10 list, all of them were featured in Fast Company’s 2010 ranking of innovation all-stars.

 

Leadership vs Management: Tale of the tape by Jorge Barba

After seeing Scott Berkun’s post on innovation vs usability in numbers, I decided to do my own search on Google’s Ngram Viewer and compared four words: innovation, creativity, management and leadership. Graph below or click through to page:

 

Innovation-Inspiring Prizes by Andrea Meyer

Point: Use open innovation challenges and prizes to inspire solutions, participation and collaboration from employees, partners and customers

 

What’s remarkable about innovation by Jeffrey Phillips

Like many of you I participate in the social media world.  That world has opened up new relationships and new sources of information for me that were completely unexpected.  I’ve learned a lot from individuals on Twitter and Facebook and Linkedin, and I’ve become a real believer in the use of social media to support innovation.

 

In Pursuit of the Perfect Brainstorm by David Segal via Ralph-Ohr

Last month, in a small room on the fifth floor of a high-rise building in San Mateo, Calif., three men sat around a table, thinking. The place was wallpapered with Post-it notes, in a riot of colors, plus column after column of index cards pinned to foam boards. Some of the cards had phrases like “space maximizers” or “stuff trackers” written on them.

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Designing for the Future Customer With Foresight Thinking by Bernhard Schindlholzer

Many organizations make the common mistake of designing a future product or service for today’s user. The user today will not be the same user you want to target in two or three product cycles.

Innovators Go It Alone by Ndubuisi Ekekwe Via @ariegoldshlager 

For a long time, Ford, Chrysler, and GM followed the same strategy: they built big gas-guzzlers. Asian competitors attacked that model, took market share, and transformed the U.S. automobile industry.

 

Collaboration and Co-creation: Incentives Are Important by Gaurav Bhalla Via @ralph_ohr

Customer collaboration and co-creation rests on a few key assumptions; that customers are passionate about the collaboration objective(s), and are willing and able to offer their time and creativity.

 

Open Innovation and Open Source: What They Share and How They Differ by Stefan Lindegaard

Based on the positive feedback from this webcast, we followed up with a conversation with regular opensource.com contributor Chris Grams and myself on the ways open source and open innovation are different and the things they share.

Relational Knowledge – We discover what we know in our relations by Daniel Durrant

Might our knowledge increase as we extend our relations further through structured learning networks? Relational knowledge transcends my brain and your brain, I can tell you that much. It is the relational space of reflection that I believe will take us to the next level: greater challenges, greater opportunities

Open Innovation Measurement – Part 3: Mass Customization by Volker Bilgram

Research on mass customization has examined the value accrued by co-creation in a stage of the value chain very close to commercialization.

Northrop Grumman, Eastman Chemical: Where to Innovate in this Economy by Andrea Meyer

Story: At Invention Machine’s Power to Innovate user conference, Jim Belfiore, Senior Director of Client Innovation and Practices, posed the question of where to innovate in this economy. Numerous presenters provided varied and surprising answers about where they find innovation and innovation-related opportunities.

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Innovation and Human Capabilities by Ralph-Christian Ohr

John Steen wrote a series of  posts on why experts and crowds usually miss disruptive innovation and how to use networks to tap expertise and knowledge. I’d like to expand these thoughts a bit more towards the question: what’s the role of human capabilities in innovation? For elaboration, I’m going to combine two concepts I’ve recently come across:

Has Google jumped the innovation shark? by Jeffrey Phillips

I was thinking recently, with the demise of Google Wave, that it is entirely possible that Google has jumped the innovation shark.  For those of you unfamiliar with the “jumped the shark” phrase, that harkens to a famous television show in the US.

Innovation. What Gives ? by Jorge Barba

Spotted this  tweet a few minutes ago : # Innovation is rare. : millions of cookbooks Sold and read all with Practically The Same recipes. What Gives ?

Large-scale Solutions without Large-scale Organizations – #BIF6 by Andrea Meyer

Instead of trying to change large organizations, we can create new human-scale organizations that embody the needed changes and inspire passion. Micro-volunteering site Sparked.org, citizen site SeeClickFix and Fabien Cousteau’s PlantaFish point the way.

Don’t Let Others Steal Your Ideas, Another Cool Idea by Stefan Lindegaard

I recently learned about two cool projects on the intersection of open innovation, IPR and ideas. They are still in the early stages, but I think they have some potential and if you work on this intersection, you should definitely check them out.

 

Is It Time to Rethink the T-Shaped Designer? by Kevin McCullagh 

At the recent DMI conference in London, Geoff Mulgan, once Tony Blair’s ex-strategy advisor and now a leading social entrepreneur, politely explained how ‘social designers’ had ‘entered his space’… and failed.

The Collaborative Organization: How to Make Employee Networks Really Work by Rob Cross, Peter Gray, Shirley Cunningham, Mark Showers and Robert J. Thomas

As information technology becomes increasingly critical within large, global organizations, chief information officers are being held to ever-higher performance standards.

So What Is Going On In Open Innovation In 2010? By Roland Harwood

Here at AngelNews we are convinced that a major platform for economic recovery will come from sustained engagement between very large corporates and their SME siblings.

Interaction Design Has An Important Role To Play In Our Future, It Has The Power To Transform Cultures by Idris Mootee

There is two articles on IC today, one on Inc. magazine and the other in Globe and Mail. We’re getting some good press coverage and we need to continue to make our story heard.

 

Boss Poop: A Morality Tale From Author Jonathan Littman by Bob Sutton

I have talked about author Jon Littman here before, as he has written a lot of books.  He co-authored gems including The Art of Innovation, Ten Faces of Innovation, and most recently “I Hate People.”

Designing Effective Open Innovation Programs by Arie Goldshlager

1)Design Open Innovation Processes that facilitate long-term trust-based relationships

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(Texto em Português depois deste)

Communication and trust

Open Innovation brings measurable results for those who embraced it with lower costs than traditional methods.

Open Innovation is” the use of inputs and outputs for purposes of knowledge to accelerate internal innovation, and expand markets for external use of innovation, respectively. [This paradigm] assumes that companies can and should use external ideas, as well as internal ideas, and internal and external paths to market, as they look to advance their technology.”- Henry Chesbrough

Open Innovation is hard! Ask different skills and ability to face new challenges.

Open Innovation requires discipline, and try to draw the right choices, to engage in new skills and tools, as well as process all of this without losing the desired pace .  

Open Innovation brings speed in placing products or services on the market.

Open Innovation can reduce risk when making decisions, it presents more and better alternatives.

Open Innovation promotes interdisciplinary actions and this increases the brand value.

Open Innovation enables collaboration with universities, reducing the cracks between them and the organizations.

Take the example of Deutsche Telekom:

“Consistent application of the logic of open innovation leads to the inclusion of the client. Open Innovation helps open the borders of the company, promoting cooperation and integration know-how of foreign brokers to meet the most demanding requirements of the innovation ecosystem. In addition to subsidiaries, suppliers, competitors, consultants, and private and public research institutions, first, the client plays a decisive role (Eurostat 2007).

Customers are equal partners in development processes of Deutsche Telekom as part of a coherent approach to open innovation. The four methods of integrating the customer – Lead user method, a contest of ideas, virtual communities, and “toolkits for innovation”- are based on theoretical principles and are exemplary in integrating the user’s approach to open innovation.”

Open innovation provides an overview of how companies can benefit from external sources of knowledge.

But open innovation also brings other challenges such as finding partners for innovation as they are clearly listed by Stefan Lindegaard on ” Top 10 Challenges in Finding Innovation Partners

As a process of knowledge transfer everything depends on the absorption capacity. The difference in ability explains many times, because an organization has more success than others.

The absorption capacity, and openness to the outside (Open Innovation) are closely related, and that connection is often characterized by fears of leakage of information or other type of insecurity.

We know that similar situations happen at any time and anywhere, so it is important to discipline when an organization embraces open innovation.

Andrea Meyer in his blog Working Knowledge  writes “Stefan Lindegaard, author of the The Open Innovation Revolution , and Greg Fox, Senior Director & CMO – Strategic Alliances at Cisco, held an invitation-only Think Tank group at the Summit to identify and discuss the key qualities of leaders of open innovation.  The group ranked communications in the top three characteristics (vision and adaptability were also key).  The Think Tank group emphasized the importance of leaders using a deliberate communications strategy with holistic internal and external communication.  Good open innovation leaders have the confidence to share what they know but also maintain proper disclosure limits with open innovation partners.”

Good leaders should read:

 

A inovação aberta e a transferência de conhecimento

Comunicação e confiança

A Inovação Aberta, traz resultados mensuráveis para quem a abraça com custos mais baixos do que os métodos tradicionais.

“Inovação aberta “ é “a utilização das entradas e saídas de propósitos de conhecimento para acelerar a inovação interna, e ampliar os mercados, para o uso externo das inovações, respectivamente. [Este paradigma] pressupõe que as empresas podem e devem usar ideias externas, assim como ideias internas, e caminhos internos e externos para o mercado, como olham para o avanço da sua tecnologia. ” – Henry Chesbrough

A Inovação Aberta, é dura! Pede competências diferentes e habilidade para enfrentar novos desafios.

A Inovação aberta, requer disciplina, para desenhar e experimentar as opções certas, para se envolver em novas competências e, ferramentas, bem como, processar tudo isso, não perdendo o ritmo desejado.  

A Inovação Aberta, traz velocidade na colocação de produtos ou serviços no mercado.

A Inovação Aberta, pode reduzir riscos, ao tomar decisões, pois apresenta mais e melhores alternativas.

A Inovação aberta, promove a interdisciplinaridade e isso aumenta o valor da marca.

A Inovação Aberta, permite uma colaboração com as universidades, reduzindo as fissuras existentes entre estas e as organizações.

Vejamos o exemplo da Deutsche Telekom:

“A aplicação consistente da lógica de inovação aberta conduz à inclusão do cliente. Inovação aberta ajuda a abrir as fronteiras da empresa, promovendo a cooperação e integração de know-how externo de correctores para cumprir os requisitos mais exigentes do ecossistema de inovação. Além de filiais, fornecedores, concorrentes, consultores, bem como privadas e instituições públicas de pesquisa, em primeiro lugar, o cliente desempenha um papel decisivo (Eurostat 2007).

Os clientes são parceiros iguais nos processos de desenvolvimento da Deutsche Telekom, como parte de uma abordagem coerente da inovação aberta. Os quatro métodos de integração do cliente – método de usuário chumbo, concurso de ideias, comunidades virtuais, e “kits de ferramentas para a inovação” – são baseadas em princípios teóricos e são exemplares para a integração do usuário na abordagem de inovação aberta.”

A abertura na inovação fornece uma visão geral de como as empresas podem beneficiar a partir de fontes externas de conhecimento.

Mas a inovação aberta também traz outro tipo de desafios como o encontrar parceiros de inovação como claramente são referidos por Stefan Lindegaard em “ Top 10 Challenges in Finding Innovation Partners

Como num processo de transferência de conhecimento tudo depende da capacidade de absorção. A diferença de capacidade explica muitas vezes, porque uma organização tem mais sucesso, do que outra.

A capacidade de absorção, e a abertura ao exterior (inovação aberta) estão intimamente ligadas e, essa ligação é caracterizada frequentemente por receios de fuga de informação ou de outro tipo de insegurança.

Nós sabemos que situações análogas acontecem em qualquer momento e em qualquer lugar, por isso é importante a disciplina quando se uma organização abraça a inovação aberta.

Andrea Meyer no seu blog Working Knowledge  “Stefan Lindegaard, autor do A Revolução Open Innovation eE Fox Greg, Director Sénior e CMO – Alianças Estratégicas em Cisco, acolheram um grupo Think Tank , só por convite, na Cimeira para identificar e discutir as principais qualidades dos líderes de inovação aberta . O grupo classificou as comunicações no topo três características (visão e capacidade de adaptação também foram chave). O grupo Think Tank ressaltou a importância de os líderes usarem uma estratégia deliberada de comunicação holística interna e externa.

Bons líderes de inovação aberta têm a confiança de partilhar o que sabem, mas também manter os limites de divulgação adequada com os parceiros de inovação aberta.”

Bons líderes devem ler:

Some good things to read!

How to Build Cooperation by Greg Satell

Can’t we all just get along?

No we can’t.  Not if we think we can win by screwing over the other guy.  We are all predators by nature (some of us more than others) and we do what we must in order to survive.

True Leaders Are Also Managers by Robert I. Sutton

Ever have occasion to do an in-depth review of the academic and practical literature on leadership? I have — twice in the past five years

 

Openness or How Do You Design for the Loss of Control? By Tim Leberecht via Ralph-Ohr

Openness is the mega-trend for innovation in the 21st century, and it remains the topic du jour for businesses of all kinds. Granted, it has been on the agenda of every executive ever since Henry Chesbrough’s seminal Open Innovation came out in 2003.

Which Part of Your Business Model is Creating Value? By Tim Kastelle

Andrew Keen posted a fascinating interview with Jeff Jarvis yesterday. All of the interview clips are worth watching – they touch on a number of interesting topics, including the relative benefits of publicness and privacy, the future of news and how to best develop new business models for journalism, why google struggles with social applications, and the changing nature of internet-based business models. The latter is included in this clip:

Strategy starts with identifying changes by Jorge Barba

Pay attention to this McKinsey Quarterly interview of Richard Rumelt, professor of strategy at UCLA’s Anderson School of Management:

Smartfailing – a new concept for learning through failure by Stefan Lindegaard

We need to become better at learning through failure, but the word failure itself is so negatively loaded. How can we create a new concept and vocabulary on the intersection of failure and learning?

The efficient use of ideas by Jeffrey Phillips

Every significant “leap forward” in the span of human consciousness has coincided with a significant change in the efficient use of a significant resource.  For example – the transition from nomadic life to farming.

Ideas Jam – How it works by Paul Sloane

We ran the Ideas Jam meeting yesterday and it went well. It was an intensive idea generation session.

Creativity Matters by John Maeda

Last month when Newsweek [07.19.10] ran a piece on how to fix the “Creativity Crisis” in America, the mainstream media brought to light critical issues that are routinely ignored in the U.S. today

How to Find Opportunities in Fragmentation by Andrea Meyer

Point: If you’re looking for a new business opportunity, look for individually-fragmented but collectively large areas of economic activity, such as where individuals or small business own a large segment of the market

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To read is fun and makes me think!

 

6 Tips for Open Collaboration by Venessa Miemis

This is a crosspost from Alpha Lo’s blog, Open Collaboration. Though he had a much catchier title for the post (“What I Learned From Venessa Miemis” – ha), I thought he did a great job listing some of the attitudes and behaviors helpful when trying to extend oneself, collaborate, and evolve. Alpha’s doing some amazing work in creating gift circles on the west coast. Check out the original post and comments here.]

 

Design Thinking in Stereo: Martin and Brown by Paula Thornton

  

When the topic of “design thinking” had gained enough momentum for BusinessWeek to devote an entire issue to design in 2004, it was a siren song to me. Newly converted, I digested everything I could find. Design thinking seemed to cover most of the experiential clues I’d been collecting as the means to improve business potential.

Innovation Is All About Behaviors by Stefan Lindegaard

I just read an interesting article in the Wall Street Journal on how the video game industry prepares to launch new technology-based developments such as new motion-based controllers.

 

Big Pharma Goes Beyond the Blues by Mitch Ditkoff

… The concept was a simple one: help organizations increase teamwork and decrease complaint by getting employees to write and perform original blues songs.

Data-rich, Discovery Poor: Pharma Looks to “Pre-Competitive” Collaborations by Deborah Goldgaber

On the 10th year anniversary of the Human Genome Project it’s been re-marked that, while undeniably a huge scientific achievement, results have fallen far short of expectations.

How Xerox Monetizes Non-Core Innovation by Andrea Meyer

Story:
Ursula Burns, CEO of Xerox, discussed innovation at her company in an interview at the World Innovation Forum June 9, 2010. She described initiatives to improve the return on innovation at Xerox’s  research centers such as PARC (Palo Alto Research Center). PARC’s ground-breaking inventions like the graphical user interface, ethernet, and postscript as inventions  had a large impact on the world but didn’t contribute enough to Xerox’s bottom line.  Let’s look at why that happened and what Xerox is doing now.

Why purpose matters by Jorge Barba

A big part of strategy making is differentiating your business from others, being able to help people notice what’s different between your product or service and mine. In the beginning of the movie Dark Night when Batman has just fought off Scarecrow and a group of Batman wannabes an interesting conversation takes place:

The future of marketing – changing the game and playing field by wimrampen via Ralph Ohr

How can Service Dominant Logic and its “value in use” mindset be helpful to rethink your marketing goals and approaches?

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The Power of Meaning by Ralph-Christian Ohr

About one year ago, I started engaging in discussions on ‘innovation’ via Twitter. As a physicist, used to work in product/innovation management for technology-based companies, my understanding of innovation was: creating value for the customer by leveraging technology development. As innovation is accomplished by people for people – companies are eventually run by people – I had a suspicion, though, that human nature is likely to play an important role in the innovation process.

MinuteClinic’s Service Design Innovation by Andrea Meyer

Story: Some of the best innovations are brilliant in their after-the-fact simplicity. Take MinuteClinic.  We all know “an ounce of prevention…” yet most of us still don’t go to the doctor for preventative care because of the cumbersome process of a office visit: scheduling an appointment, taking time off work, waiting in the doctor’s office for unknown amounts of time, sitting in the midst of other hacking/sneezing people, and being unsure how much the visit will cost

WORLD INNOVATION FORUM 2010 by Mitch Ditkoff

I just returned from the World Innovation Forum in NYC.

My big insight? Thought leaders will soon be a thing of the past.

In their place? Feeling leaders — business savants who have made the journey from head to heart and aren’t afraid to let the rest of us know what they’ve learned along the way.

 

The Limitations of Open Innovation by Stefan Lindegaard

…often lie in the minds of people. I had an interesting workshop this week working with one of the leading gaming companies and I was once again reminded on the limitations set by imagination.

The power of bringing in an outsider for #innovation by Jorge Barba

Nilofer Merchant, CEO of Rubicon Consulting, argues that if organizations want to be innovative they should stop hiring the same type of people just to meet the requirements of the job position:

It seems to me we ought to also know how to get diverse points of view into the system, because that is what allows us to see things from different angles and fundamentally shift our approach from seeing the problem the way it’s always been seen (and thus unsolved, one could presume) and see it afresh to create the shift in viewpoint that allows for a new creative act.

‘Oops! I’m deviating from the group; I have to do something about it!’ Rotterdam School  Via @ariegoldshlager

Rotterdam/Nijmegen, 15 January 2008 — A team of researchers from the Rotterdam School of Management, Erasmus University has conducted an unprecedented experiment that reveals what brain processes are involved in social conformism. It is a well-known fact that people have a tendency to adjust their opinions to those held by others

Biz 2.0: Orchestrated Improvisation by Paula Thornton

Reading Andy McAfee’s recent piece “IT’s Three Key Organizational Transformations”, spurred a personal thinking theme today. I was a bit disturbed (and disappointed) by what Andy seemed to miss in his thought — stuff that 2.0 thinking hinges on (but it wouldn’t be the first time, or likely the last).

Innovation & Correspondence Bias – Misunderstanding motivation misreads meaning by Andrew (Drew)

The more we learn about the individual and social psychology misunderstandings at play in organization life, specifically in the development of innovations, the harder it is to identify clear and unambiguous actions we can take to address them. We must become adept at inquiry, observation, exploration and reflection – any of which might be effectively preceded by the word “self”. Thankfully these are prerequisites for effective innovation which makes for some strong synergies if we can apply the skills effectively.

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